Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Polymedon m Greek Mythology
Derived from πολῠ- (polu-) meaning “many” and μέδων (medon) meaning "ruler".
Polymele f Greek Mythology
Means "many songs" in Ancient Greek.
Polynices m Greek Mythology
Means "manifold strife" in Ancient Greek.... [more]
Polynikes m Greek Mythology, Literature
From Greek polys (πολυς) -"much, many" combined with nike (νικη)- "victory". In Greek mythology he was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta.
Polyphonte f Greek Mythology
Means "slayer of many" in Ancient Greek.
Polyxenos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Masculine form of Polyxene (see Polyxena). A notable bearer of this name was the Indo-Greek king Polyxenos Epiphanes Soter, who reigned around 100 BC.
Polyxenus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Polyxenos. In Greek mythology, this was the name of one of the suitors of Helen of Troy.
Polyxo f Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown, likely related to πολῠ- (polu-) meaning “many”.
Ponos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πόνος (ponos) meaning "pain." In Greek mythology, Ponos was the god of toil and a grandson of Nyx, the goddess of the night.
Pooka f Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Celtic Mythology
Means "spirit" in Irish folklore. Pooka is another name for "Will-o the Wisp".... [more]
Popo m New World Mythology
Short form of Popocatepetl, which means "smoking mountain" in Nahuatl from popoca "it smokes" and tepetl "mountain". This is the name of a hero in Mexican legend and Aztec mythology, the lover of Princess Ixtli... [more]
Popocatepetl m Folklore, New World Mythology, Aztec and Toltec Mythology
According to the legend, at the beginning of history, when the Aztecs arrived in the Valley of Anahuac, before the mountains had reached their permanent form, a beautiful princess named Mixtli was born, in the city of Tenochtitlan... [more]
Porphyrion m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πορφυρα (porphyra) meaning "purple dye" as well as "purple-fish". Also compare the Greek noun πορφυρίς (porphyris) meaning "purple garment, purple cloak" and the Greek given name Porphyrios (see Porfirio)... [more]
Porthaon m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology several men bear this name.
Postverta f Roman Mythology
A goddess prayed to when a baby was being birthed head-first. See also Prosa.
Potamon m Greek Mythology
Derived from ποτάμι (potámi) meaning "river".
Potina f Roman Mythology
Goddess who enables a child to drink.
Potipher m Judeo-Christian Legend
Joseph's owner and husband of the pretty young woman who tried to seduce him (Genesis 37:36-9). In the Arabic tradition, his name is Butifar, and his wife's is Zeleikha (Qur'an 12).
Potira f New World Mythology, Tupi
Means "flower" in Tupi.
Pradakshina f Hinduism
Pradakshina is called parikrma means to take a round of statue of god, holy Placea or place worth to pay respect.
Praxander m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Πράξανδρος (Praxandros), which is a name that is derived from Greek πραξις (praxis) "action, exercise" combined with Greek ανδρος (andros) "of a man"... [more]
Praxidike f Ancient Greek, Astronomy, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πραξις (praxis) "action, exercise" combined with Greek δικη (dike) meaning "justice, judgement" as well as "custom, usage". In Greek mythology, Praxidike was the goddess of lawful punishment and an exactor of vengeance... [more]
Praxithea f Greek Mythology
The name of a number of Greek mythological figures derived from πραξις (praxis) meaning "action, exercise" and θεά (thea) meaning "goddess".
Prema f Roman Mythology
Prema is the insistent sex act, from the verb primo, primere, to press upon. Although the verb usually describes the masculine role, Augustine calls Prema dea Mater, a mother goddess.
Presbon m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "elder, senior".
Pressyne f Mythology
Etymology unknown. In mythology, this was the name of the mother of the fairy woman Melusine.
Prija f Slavic Mythology
It was Slavic goddess of good wishes. The similar of Norse goddess Freya.
Primigenia f Roman Mythology
Roman name meaning "primal", an epithet of the Goddess Fortuna.
Prithvi m & f Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit पृथ्वी (pṛthvī́) meaning "Earth". In Hindu and Buddhist belief, Prithvi is a devi (goddess) and a consort of Vishnu.
Procris f Greek Mythology
Latinized of Greek name Πρόκρις (Prokris), which is derived from Ancient Greek "προκρίνω" (prokrino) - «choose before others, prefer, select». Procris was a daughter of Erechtheus, king of Athens, and wife of prince Cephalus, who accidently killed her during the hunt.
Proioxis f Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown. The Greek mythological personification of onrush or persuit in battle.
Prokles m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρό (pro) meaning "before, forth, forward" combined with Greek κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory".
Prokne f Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek περκνός (perknos) "dark-spotted", a word used to refer to eagles. In Greek mythology Prokne or Procne was the wife of the Thracian king Tereus. Tereus raped Procne's sister Philomela and cut out her tongue, so Procne fed Tereus the flesh of their son Itys... [more]
Prolochos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρό (pro) meaning "before, forth, forward" combined with the Greek noun λόχος (lochos) meaning "ambush", a word that later came to signify a tactical sub unit of the ancient Greek army... [more]
Prolochus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Prolochos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the Lapiths, a tribe from Thessaly.
Promachus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "who leads in battle" or "champion".
Promedon m Greek Mythology
Derived from προ- (pro-) meaning “before” and μέδων (medon)# meaning "ruler".
Promeus m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρόμος (promos) meaning "foremost, foremost man". Also compare Greek προμυέω (promueō) meaning "to initiate beforehand" and Prometheus, which are both etymologically related... [more]
Pronax m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Greek adverb πρώ (pro) meaning "early (in the day)". It is a variant of the Greek adverb πρωΐ (proi) meaning "early in the day, during morning"... [more]
Pronnat m Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Marathi
Highly elevated; superior
Pronnati f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati, Nepali
"High elevation" ;"superiority "... [more]
Pronoe f Greek Mythology
The name of several figures in Greek mythology, meaning "forethought".
Prosa f Roman Mythology
A goddess who averts breech birth. See also Postverta.
Prosymna f Greek Mythology
Means "celebrate in song". This is the name of one of the Asterionides, Naiads who nursed the goddess Hera in her infancy.
Protesilaus m Greek Mythology
Derived from πρῶτος (prôtos) meaning “first”, ἕσῐς (hésis) which means “sending forth”),‎ and #λᾱός (lāós), meaning “people”.
Prothoenor m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is not quite certain. Through a variant spelling, it might be derived from of one of the following two Greek adjectives: πρῶτος (protos) meaning "first, earliest" and πρωτός (protos) meaning "destined"... [more]
Protogeneia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρωτογενής (prôtogenês) meaning "firstborn, primeval" (see Protogenes). This was the name of several figures in Greek mythology, as well as an epithet of the goddess Tyche (equivalent to Latin Primigenia, an epithet of Fortuna).
Providentia f Roman Mythology
In ancient Roman religion, Providentia is a divine personification of the ability to foresee and make provision. She was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the Imperial cult of ancient Rome.
Prymneus m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρυμνεύς (prymneus) meaning "steersman", which is ultimately derived from Greek πρύμνα (prymna) meaning "stern, poop". Also compare Greek πρυμνός (prymnos) meaning "hindmost, undermost, end-most"... [more]
Prytanis m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, History
Derived from the Greek noun πρύτανις (prytanis) meaning "prince, ruler, lord, chief".... [more]
Psamanthe f Greek Mythology, Literature
Variant of Psamathe used in George Sandys's translation (1623) of Ovid's Metamorphoses, among other translations.
Psamathe f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ψάμαθος (psamathos) meaning "sand of the seashore". This was the name of multiple characters in Greek mythology, including one of the Nereids, as well as the mortal mother of Linus... [more]
Psekas f Greek Mythology
The name of one of the band of sixty young Okeanid Nymphs which formed the core retinue of the goddess Artemis. Her name is derived from the word ψεκας (psekas) meaning "rain shower".
Ptahil m Judeo-Christian Legend
This is the name of the Mandaean demiurge (see Demiurgos), probably based on a Mandaic root pth meaning "to mold" (or related to Egyptian Ptah) and the divine suffix il, which is Hebrew 'el (El).
Puah f Hebrew, Egyptian Mythology
In the old testament, this was the name of one of the midwives who disobeyed Pharoah's orders to kill any Hebrew boys they delivered. Often seen alongside the name Shiphrah.
Pukkeenegak f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Pukkeenegak is a goddess of children, pregnancy, childbirth and the making of clothes.
Pumphut m Slavic Mythology
Pumphut is the name of a Sorbian gnome who plays tricks on abusive people. He is featured in the the novel 'Krabat' by Ottfried Preußler where he challenges the evil master in a duel of magic and defeats him.... [more]
Pupul f Hinduism
Its a hindu name meaning flower
Purandar m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Indian (Sikh)
"Destroyer of strongholds " ; "destroyer of castles " ; lord Indra ... [more]
Puschkayts m Baltic Mythology
Old Prussian god of the earth.... [more]
Pyara f Hinduism
From the Hindi word प्यार (pyara) meaning "love"
Pygmalion m Phoenician (Hellenized), Greek Mythology
Hellenized form of the Phoenician theophoric name Pu'mayyaton or Pu'myatan, which means "Pumay has given" or "the gift of Pumay" in Phoenician. However, it should be noted that there are two sources that claim that the meaning is "the tallest Pumay" and a few other sources that claim that the name consists of the god's name and the epithet 'eljon or geljon, which probably corresponds to the Hebrew religious epithet Elyon meaning "the most high, the highest"... [more]
Pylaeus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πύλαιος (Pylaios), which is derived from Greek πύλη (pyle) meaning "gate, entrance". In Greek mythology, Pylaeus was an ally of king Priam in the Trojan War.
Pylenor m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from either the Greek noun πύλη (pyle) meaning "gate, entrance" or from the name of the Greek town of Pylos (see Pylos), which is etymologically related to the aforementioned word... [more]
Pylos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πύλος (pylos) meaning "in the gateway", which is ultimately derived from the Greek noun πύλη (pyle) meaning "gate, entrance". Pylos is also the name of a town in modern Greece, which already existed in the time of Mycenaean Greece (under the same name) and was an important kingdom at the time.
Pylus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Pylos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of a son of the god Ares, whom he had with Demonice.
Pyrame m Greek Mythology (Gallicized)
French form of Pyramus. A known bearer of this name was the Swiss botanist Augustin Pyrame de Candolle (1778-1841).
Pyramus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
From the Greek Πυραμος (Pyramos), taken from the name of the river Pyramos and derived from Greek πυρ (pyr) "fire" or πυρος (pyros) "wheat". In classical mythology, he was the lover of Thisbe.
Pyrene f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πῦρ (pyr) meaning "fire". In Greek mythology, Pyrene was a lover of Hercules, for whom the mountain range the Pyrenees are named. Also, the name Pyrene is not to be confused with Pirene, the name of three other characters from Greek mythology.
Pyreneus m Greek Mythology
Masculine form of Pyrene. In Greek mythology, Pyreneus was a king of Thrace.
Pyronia f Greek Mythology
Epithet of the goddess Artemis derived from Greek πυρ (pyr) meaning "fire". It is also the name of a genus of butterfly.
Pyrrha f Greek Mythology
Feminine of Pyrrhos.... [more]
Pythias f & m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek Πυθιος (Pythios), which is an epithet of the god Apollo. This epithet originated from his cult in the city of Πυθώ (Pytho), which is nowadays known as Delphi... [more]
Python m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Python was an enormous earth-dragon (usually depicted as a serpent in ancient Greek art) who lived near the city of Πυθώ (Pytho), which is nowadays known as Delphi. The creature was named after the city, whose name was ultimately derived from the Greek verb πύθω (pytho) meaning "to rot, to decay"... [more]
Qaammatip-inua m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "man in the moon". This is the name of a character in Greenlandic mythology.
Qadeshtu f Near Eastern Mythology
Canaanite and Phoenician form of Qetesh.
Qamaits f New World Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of a Nuxalk warrior goddess associated with death, beginnings, creation, earthquakes, forest fires, and sickness.
Qebehsenuef m Egyptian Mythology
Means "he who refreshes his brothers".... [more]
Qetesh f Egyptian Mythology
The name of a goddess of fertility, sacred ecstasy and sexual pleasure, derived from the Semitic root Q-D-Š which means "holy".
Qianhuang m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 乾 (qián, a trigram symbol that represents “heaven”) and 荒 (huāng, meaning “wilderness, wasteland”). This is supposedly the personal name of Zhuanxu, one of the Five Emperors and grandson of the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan).
Qiongchan m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 穷 (qióng, meaning “to reach a limit” or “poor”) and 蝉 (chán, meaning “cicada”). This name was borne by one of the sons of Zhuanxu who was given ownership of the Gumu (姑幕) Kingdom... [more]
Qiqirn m & f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Qiqirn is a large, bald dog spirit.
Qira f New World Mythology (Modern, Rare)
Varient of Ciara, and possibly from "奇拉", meaning "Odd Pull".
Quaoar m & f New World Mythology, Astronomy
Also known as Chingichngish, Ouiamot, Tobet and Saor, Quaoar is the name of an important figure in the mythology of the so-called Mission Indians of coastal Southern California, a group of Takic-speaking peoples, today divided into the Payomkowishum (Luiseño), Tongva (Gabrieliño and Fernandeño), and Acjachemem (Juaneño) tribes or peoples... [more]
Querella f Roman Mythology
Means "complaint, lamentation" in Latin. In Roman mythology Querella was the personification of mockery, blame, ridicule, scorn, complaint and stinging criticism, equivalent to the Greek daemon Momos (who was expelled from heaven for ridiculing the gods).
Quikinna'qu m Siberian Mythology
Derived from a Koryak word meaning "big raven". In Koryak mythology, Quikinna'qu (or Kutkinnaku) is a shapeshifting deity who taught humans to hunt, fish, and create fire.
Quilla f Incan Mythology (Hispanicized)
Hispanicized form of Killa. In Inca mythology Mama Quilla or Mama Killa was the goddess of the moon, worshipped in particular by women and often represented by a disc made of either gold or silver... [more]
Quissik m Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "urinated on" in Greenlandic. Quissik was the name of a shaman, still remembered in local legends, who acquired that name when foxes in human figure urinated on him.
Raavi f Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Kannada, Telugu
Name: Raavi / Raawi रावी... [more]
Raedieahkka f Sami Mythology
Raedieahkka was the wife of the superior Sami deity Radien-attje.
Raet f Egyptian Mythology
Feminine form of Ra... [more]
Raidne f Greek Mythology
Raidne is one of the Sirens and the meaning of the name is unknown.
Raiponce f Folklore (Gallicized)
French cognate of Rapunzel. This is used as the French name for the fairy tale character.
Rajabharya f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian
MEANING - queen, wife of king, King's wife
Rajastri f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Gujarati, Hindi, Bengali
MEANING - wife of king, Queen. Here राज means royal , king + स्त्री means wife, woman ... [more]
Rajin m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Nepali, Sinhalese, Punjabi, Bengali
Name : Rajin राजिन्... [more]
Rajyi f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Nepali
MEANING : Queen, wife of king, Princess... [more]
Ram m Avestan, Persian Mythology
In the Zoroastrianism Ram is the angel (yazata) presiding over joy and felicity.
Raman m Indian, Hinduism
Raman is one of the names of the Hindu God Rama.
Raman m Persian Mythology, Persian
Derived from Avestan rama meaning "peace", of which the Pahlavi (i.e. Middle Persian) equivalent is ram (see Ramin).... [more]
Ramnath m Indian, Hinduism
Derived from Rama and Sanskrit natha "lord".... [more]
Rampa f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Gujarati, Bengali, Marathi
Name : Rampa रम्पा... [more]
Rampion f Folklore
In some versions of Rapunzel, Rapunzel's name is Rampion, after the lettuce her father stole.
Rán f Norse Mythology, Astronomy, Icelandic
Of uncertain etymology. It could be derived from Old Norse rán "robberty, theft" or rámr "hoarse". In Norse mythology, Rán is a sea goddess and ruler of the dead at the bottom of the sea... [more]
Rana Niejta f Sami Mythology
Derived from rana meaning "green, green fields" and niejta meaning "girl, daughter". This is the Sami goddess of spring and fertility.
Randalín f Norse Mythology
In the Saga of Ragnar Lothbrók, his second wife Áslaug changes her name to Randalín when she goes to avenge the lives of her stepsons.... [more]
Randgrid f Norse Mythology
Modern form of Randgríðr. This name is not used as a personal name in Norway, but a valkyrie bears this name.
Randgríðr f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name elements rǫnd "shield" and gríð "peace, protection, mercy, truce". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Rangarajan m Hinduism
Means "Lord Vishnu."
Ranginui m Polynesian Mythology, Maori, Cook Islands Maori
Derived from Rangi and nui meaning "large, big, vast, great." This is another name for the Maori god of the sky.
Raphi f Quechua (?), Incan Mythology (?)
Means "petal" in Quechua.
Raran m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Gujarati, Punjabi, Hinduism, Malayalam, Nepali, Telugu, Marathi, Kannada
MEANING - liberal, bestowing, bountiful, distributing
Rashti f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Telugu, Tamil, Bengali, Gujarati
MEANING : { to rign , rule, shine, be splendid, to govern}... [more]
Rasu'aya f Judeo-Christian Legend
This is the name given to the wife of Arphaxad in the Book of Jubilees.
Rataa f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh), Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali, Assamese, Bengali
MEANING - beloved, amused, fond or enamoured of, delighting in
Ratatoskr m Norse Mythology
Meaning "drill-tooth" or "bore-tooth" Ratatoskr is a squirrel who runs up and down the world tree Yggdrasil to carry messages between the eagle perched atop the tree, and the serpent Níðhöggr, who lives beneath the roots of the tree.
Ráðgríðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "the bossy", or derived from ráð ("counsel, advise") and gríð ("vehemence, eagerness; protection"). This is the name of a Valkyrie.
Ráðný f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Germanic name elements ráð "advise, counsel, decision" and "new moon, waxing moon". This is the name of a character in the Old Norse poem Sólarljóð ("song of the sun").
Ráðspakr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "wise, shrewd, discerning". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Ráðsviðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from ráð ("advice, counsel, decision") and sviðr ("fast; clever"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Rauni f & m Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Perhaps a variant of Rauno or Ragnhild, or derived from Old Norse reynir meaning "rowan". In Finnish mythology Rauni was either the name of god Ukko's spouse, or another name for Ukko himself... [more]
Ravana m Hinduism
Means "roaring, screaming" in Sanskrit, derived from रव (rava) meaning "roar, yell, cry". In the Hindu epic Ramayana, this is the name of a demon king who abducts Sita.
Razivia f Slavic Mythology
Old Slavonic variant of Živa and Zivena.
Rearea f Polynesian Mythology
The goddess of joy in Tahitian mythology. Her name may come from reʻareʻa, meaning "yellow".
Reginleifr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Reginleif. This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Reginn m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse regin or rögn "advice." In Norse mythology, Reginn was a son of the dwarf king Hreiðmárr and foster father to Sigurd.
Reifnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from reifir ("giver, helper"). This is the name of a sea-king in Norse mythology.
Reistr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Vræistr. Jarðar ("of the earth") Reistr is another name for Jǫrmungandr.
Rekkr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Rinkr. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Remas m Lithuanian, Roman Mythology
Lithuanian form of Remus.
Renenutet f Egyptian Mythology
In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of nourishment and the harvest, and as such was worshiped mainly during harvest. She was often depicted as a cobra or as a woman with the head of a cobra. She was sometimes portrayed as the consort of Sobek, Shai, or Geb, with whom she had the snake god Nehebkau... [more]
Renuka f Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Marathi, Bengali, Odia, Malayalam, Tamil
Derived from Sanskrit रेणुका (renuka) referring to a kind of medicine and perfume said to be fragrant, bitter-tasting and greyish in colour. This is the name of a Hindu goddess particularly revered in parts of western and southern India.
Repun-kamuy m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of the sea, depicted as either an orca or a harpoon-wielding young man.
Resheph m Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Semitic ršf meaning "to absorb, to consume" or "to burn" (descended into Hebrew as רשף (reshef) "burning heat" or "plague"). This was the name of a Canaanite and Semitic deity of plague, the underworld, and war.
Reshnee f Hinduism
SILK... [more]
Revant m Hinduism
MEANING : wealthy, opulent, splendid, brilliant, handsome. It is the name of a son of lord Surya ... [more]
Rhadamanthos m Greek Mythology
I am uncertain of the meaning, but it might be etymologically related to Greek adámas "invincible, untamed" or Greek damázo "to overpower, to tame, to conquer." In Greek mythology, Rhadamanthos was a son of Zeus and Europa.
Rhadamanthus m Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, probably of pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek ῥᾴδιος (rhaidios) "easy" and μανθάνω (manthanô) "to learn, come to know". In Greek mythology, Rhadamanthus or Rhadamanthys was a son of Zeus and Europa... [more]
Rhagnell f Welsh Mythology
The name of a Mythical Welsh Princess, Blodeuwedd's Maid, Who is spoken of in most stories of Blodeuwedd as her Loyal and Faithfull Friend in Blodeuwedd's Lonely World.
Rhamnousia f Greek Mythology
An epithet of the Greek Goddess of retribution, Nemesis, meaning "the Goddess of Rhamnous". Rhamnous was an ancient Greek city and the site of Nemesis' most prominent sanctuary.
Rhanis f Greek Mythology
The name of one of the band of sixty young Okeanid Nymphs which formed the core retinue of the goddess Artemis. Her name is derived from the word Ψεκας (rhanis) meaning "raindrop".
Rheda f Anglo-Saxon Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Old English Hrêðe or Hrêða. Rheda is a goddess attested solely by Bede in his 8th-century work De temporum ratione, where she is connected with the month "Rhedmonth" (which is the equivalent of modern day March).
Rheme f African Mythology
Rheme was used in African Mythology and means 'The Life'
Rhexenor m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ῥηξήνωρ (rhexenor) meaning "bursting through ranks of armed men (of the enemy)", which consists of the Greek noun ῥῆξις (rhexis) meaning "breaking, bursting, breaking forth" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".... [more]
Rhodope f Greek Mythology, Late Greek
Derived from the Greek adjective ῥοδωπός (rhodopos) meaning "rosy-faced, rosy", which consists of the Greek noun ῥόδον (rhodon) meaning "rose" combined with the Greek noun ὤψ (ops) meaning "eye, face, countenance".... [more]
Rhoeo f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ροή (rhoē) "flow, stream". In Greek mythology, this was the name of a woman loved by Apollo.
Richeyu f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Hinduism, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi, Nepali, Sinhalese, Indian (Sikh)
MEANING - one who knows hymns, praising, following sacred laws
Richik m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Gujarati, Marathi, Assamese, Nepali, Sinhalese
MEANING - one who knows sacred verses, one sings hymns, praising, Name of a Rishi
Riddh m Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Hinduism, Punjabi, Bengali, Nepali
MEANING: increased, thriving, prosperous, abundant, wealthy, filled with (voices), made to resound,stored grain,... [more]
Riddhida f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Nepali, Sinhalese, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese
MEANING - giver of sucess, bestowing magical-powers or fortune. a name of goddess Durga. Here ऋद्धि means magicalpowers, success + दा means conferring
Riddhil m Hinduism
Name: Riddhil ऋद्धिल... [more]
Riddhila f Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Bengali
Name: Riddhila ऋद्धिला... [more]
Riddhimaan m Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Nepali
MEANING : rich, prosperous ... [more]
Rig m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism
MEANING : verse, praise ... [more]
Rígr m Norse Mythology
A Norse god, described as "old and wise, mighty and strong", fathers the classes of mankind. The prose introduction of Rígsþula (or Rígsmál) states that Rígr is another name for Heimdall, who is also called the father of mankind in Völuspá.
Rinda f Popular Culture, English, Norse Mythology
Short form of names ending in -rinda (Florinda, Lorinda, etc.).... [more]
Rindr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Vrindr. In Norse mythology Rindr is a giantess, the mother of Odin's son Váli.
Riphath m Biblical, Irish Mythology, Irish, Scottish
Name of Gomer second-born son in Genesis ch. 10. Irish/Scottish oral tradition (Leber Gabala Eirinn) lists him as the ancestor of the Scots (including the Irish). They too call him the second son of Gomer... [more]
Rira f Persian Mythology
If spell separately in Persian (Farsi), Rira is the name of the woman in Persian mythology who brings beauty to the jungles of north of Iran. It is also attributed to a spacial rain that does so too... [more]
Riri f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Indian, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Marathi, Bengali
MEANING - prince's metal, pale brass
Ritona f Celtic Mythology
Ritona is a Celtic goddess chiefly venerated in the land of the Treveri in what is now Germany. Her name is related to the same root as Welsh rhyd "ford", which suggests that she was a goddess of fords.
Rivalitas f Roman Mythology
Means "jealous rivalry" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of Nemesis.
Robigo f Roman Mythology
A minor god in Roman mythology, the name comes from the 'wheat rust' that Romans were asking protection from (the 'wheat rust' being a red fungus that could infest crops). The festival Robigalia, where they sacrificed non-edible animals, was held on April 25th... [more]
Robigus m Roman Mythology
A minor god in Roman mythology, the name comes from the 'wheat rust' that Romans were asking protection from (the 'wheat rust' being a red fungus that could infest crops). The festival Robigalia, where they sacrificed non-edible animals, was held on April 25th... [more]
Roch m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati, Marathi, Nepali, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam
"Shining "; "radiant" ;"one who lightens or makes bright "... [more]
Rokapi m Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Rokapi was an evil spirit and the leader of the kudiani (a group of witches) in Georgian mythology. He was punished by Ghmerti and chained to a column underneath the earth, where he ate the hearts of humans that his kudianis would bring to him... [more]
Rǫkkvi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Maybe the name is related to the Old Norse word røkkr meaning "twilight" or røkkva meaning "to grow dark". In Norse mythology, Rǫkkvi was the name of a sea king
Roma f Roman Mythology
In ancient Roman religion, Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. She embodied Rome in complex ways and symbolized the ideal woman in society
Rosanella f Folklore (Anglicized)
From the French name Rosanie, which is probably an elaboration of Rose. This is the titular character of the French fairy tale 'Rosanella'... [more]
Rosanie f Folklore
Probably an elaboration of Rose. This is the name of a princess in the fairy tale 'Ricdin-Ricdon' by Marie-Jeanne L'Héritier. It was also used by the Comte de Caylus for the titular princess in his fairy tale 'Rosanie' (usually known in English as 'Rosanella').
Rosaspina f Folklore (Italianized)
From Italian rosa meaning "rose" and spina "thorn, spine", used as a translation of German Dornröschen, the title character of a Brothers Grimm fairy tale (known as Briar Rose in English).
Rosenrot f Folklore, German (Modern, Rare)
German form of Rose Red, used in the fairy tale 'Snow White and Rose Red' by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm.
Rǫskva f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from rǫskr "brave". In Norse mythology Rǫskva is a farmer's daughter; Thor takes her and her brother Þjálfi with him as servants when he goes to Utgarðaloki.
Rosmerta f Celtic Mythology
Probably means "great provider" from Gaulish ro, an intensive prefix (hence "very, most, great"), combined with smert "purveyor, carer" and the feminine name suffix a. This was the name of an obscure Gallo-Roman goddess of fertility, abundance and prosperity... [more]
Roszpunka f Folklore
Polish name for Rapunzel, which is taken from their word for corn salad, also known as the Valerianella plant. This is also how the original German Rapunzel is named... [more]
Róta f Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from the Old Norse verb róta meaning "to stir, overturn, tear". In Norse mythology, Róta is a valkyrie. She is attested in the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, where she is mentioned alongside the valkyries Gunnr and Skuld... [more]
Rougarou m Folklore
The name of a werewolf-like creature in Laurentian French. It is derived from standard French loup garou "werewolf" (where loup means "wolf" and garou is a borrowed word from Germanic were-wolf via Frankish garulf).
Royintan m Persian, Persian Mythology, Literature
Means "one who has a body of brass", derived from the Middle Persian adjective rōyēn meaning "brazen" (ultimately from rōy meaning "brass, copper") combined with the Middle Persian noun tan meaning "body, person".... [more]
Rozhanitsa f Slavic Mythology
An obscure Russian goddess who has a feast day in late December. She is a winter goddess and is usually depicted wearing antlers.
Rübezahl m Germanic Mythology
In Silesian legends, Rübezahl is the 'lord of the mountains' in the Riesengebirge. He is also described as a 'prince of gnomes'.... [more]
Rubiel m Spanish (Latin American), Judeo-Christian Legend
Possibly a genuine Hebrew name, of which the first element may be etymologically related to Ruben. The second element would certainly be derived from Hebrew el "God"... [more]
Ruchika f Hinduism
Ruchika means Shinning or Beautiful, is of Indian origin.
Ruchir m Hinduism
Ruchir means Beautiful... [more]
Rudá m New World Mythology, Portuguese (Brazilian), Tupi
He is the god of love in the mythology of the Tupí and Guaraní peoples of South America.
Rudabeh f Persian Mythology, Pakistani (Rare), Indian (Rare), Bengali (Rare)
Derived from the Persian noun رود (rud) meaning "river, torrent" combined with the Persian noun آب (ab) meaning "water".... [more]
Rudra m Hinduism, Indian, Odia, Assamese, Bengali, Nepali
Mans "crying, howling, roaring" or "dreadful, formidable" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god featured in the Rigveda. He is most often associated with the god Vayu, wind, storms and the hunt.
Rueen m Persian Mythology, English
The Book of Kings ... [more]
Ruhi f Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Nepali, Malayalam
MEANING- ascending, mounting, grown
Rumina f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin rūma "udder". This name belonged to a goddess who protected breastfeeding mothers and possibly nursing infants. Her domain extended to protecting animal mothers, not just human ones... [more]
Rusalka f Slavic Mythology, Theatre, German (Rare)
A water nymph in Slavic Mythology. Also the name of an opera written by the Czech writer Antonín Dvorák.
Rushou m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 蓐 (ru, meaning “straw mat”) and 收 (shou, meaning “to gather” or “harvest”). Rushou is the Chinese god of metal who oversees the season of autumn and the west... [more]
Saam m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Nepali, Marathi
"Sweet words for winning an adversary "; pacify; tranquilize; appease... [more]
Saarav m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi
Name : Saarav सारव... [more]
Saayan m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Malayalam, Gujarati, Marathi
MEANING : ( in astron.) with the precession or the longitude of a planet reckoned from the vernal equinoctial point
Saayra f Hinduism, Arabic
Variant of Aayra.
Sabazios m Greek Mythology
Sabazios was the sky father and nomadic horseman of the Phrygians and Thracians.
Sabrael m Judeo-Christian Legend
Sabrael is a male angel of hebrew origin.
Sabriel f & m Literature, Judeo-Christian Legend
There are multiple explanations for the etymology of this name. One is that it is a variant form of Sabrael. An other is that it is derived from Hebrew sabi "stop, rest" combined with el "God", thus meaning "(the) rest of God"... [more]
Sacharu m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Gujarati, Indian
MEANING - beautiful, lovely, handsome... [more]
Sachiel m Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "the covering of God". Archangel of the order of Cherubim in Christian Angelogy and Kabbala.
Sade f Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "rain" in Finnish.
Sadwes f Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Sadwes was the Ancient Persian goddess of rain, hail, thunder, lightning and storms.
Sæhrímnir m Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Norse mythology this is the name of a boar which provides food for Valhalla.
Safa m Ossetian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Ossetian God of the hearth chain and the most important domestic deity to the Ossetian people.
Sahaana f Hinduism
Variant of Sahana.
Sahana f Hinduism
Sanskrit, indian
Sahaquiel m Hebrew, Judeo-Christian Legend
Apparently means "ingenuity of God" in Hebrew. This is the name of one of the seven archangels mentioned in the Third Book of Enoch.
Sahsnot m Old Saxon, Germanic Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from Sahson, the indigenous name of a continental Germanic people called the Saxons, who in turn derived their name from Old Saxon sahs meaning "knife, dagger, sword"... [more]
Sai f & m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Shai (the Egyptian god)
Sakasha f & m Sanskrit, Indian, Malayalam, Hinduism, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Punjabi, Bengali, Marathi, Nepali, Kannada
Meaning- near, visible, present, having appearance, vicinity
Sakuya m & f Japanese, Japanese Mythology
As a unisex name, it can be used as 咲也, 咲哉, 咲弥, 朔夜 or 朔椰 with 咲 (shou, sa.ku, -zaki) meaning "bloom, blossom", 朔 (saku, tsuitachi) meaning "conjuction (astronomy), first day of the month", 也 (e, ya, ka, nari, mata) meaning "to be (archaic form)", 哉 (sai, kana, ya) meaning "alas, how, question mark, what", 弥 (bi, mi, amaneshi, iya, iyoiyo, tooi, hisashi, hisa.shii, ya, wata.ru) meaning "all the more, increasingly", 夜 (ya, yo, yoru) meaning "evening, night" and 椰 (ya, yashi) meaning "coconut tree."... [more]
Šala f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of the consort of Adad, often considered to be a minor goddess of non-Mesopotamian origin, potentially related to crop fertility. The etymology of her name is unknown, but may be from the Hurrian šāla meaning "daughter".
Salaneide f Sami Mythology
Derived from sala meaning "sun" and neida meaning "daughter, girl". This is the name of the Sami solar goddess.
Salmacis f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Uncertain, but possibly means "of the same body", from Latin salma, meaning body or corpse, and cis, meaning on the same side. Salmacis was a nymph featured in Ovid's Metamorphosis, who fell in love with Hermaphroditus... [more]
Salmoneus m Greek Mythology
A king from Greek mythology, who, during the Trojan war, pretended to be Zeus.
Samali f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Nepali, Assamese
Means "nosegay, collection of flowers" in Sanskrit.
Samata f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Nepali, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi
MEANING - equality, evenness, sameness, equanimity, mediocrity, impartiality
Sambid m Hinduism, Nepali
a form of the word 'Vidya' which means wisdom/knowledge. Sum is a prefix which makes it a positive wisdom, wise, knowledgable person defined as sambid. For further reference, look into a Nepali,Hindi,Sanskrit dictionary.
Sampsa m Finnish Mythology, Finnish
Finnish variant of Sampson. In Finnish mythology Sampsa Pellervoinen was a god of fertility, fields and crops.
Samsin Halmoni f Korean Mythology
The name of the triple goddess of childbirth and fate in Korean mythology. It is derived from the hanja 三 (sam) meaning "three", 神 (sin) meaning "god, goddess, spirit" and 할머니 (halmoni) meaning "grandmother", an honourific term for goddesses highlighting their wisdom.
Samyaza m Ancient Aramaic, Biblical Greek, Jewish Legend
This is the name of a fallen angel in the Book of Enoch who is portrayed as the leader of a band of angels called the Watchers that lust after mortal women and become fallen angels.
Sanaya f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Telugu, Tamil
MEANING - old, ancient, long lasting, linger. It is derived from Sanskrit word Sanay ( सनय )... [more]
Sandalphon m Judeo-Christian Legend (Hellenized)
The name of an archangel. Some of the earliest sources on Sandalphon refer to him as the prophet Elijah transfigured and rose to angelic status, later sources refer to him as twin brother of Metatron.
Sandaramet f Armenian Mythology
The Armenian goddess of death, the underworld and hell, also associated with the land and the earth. Her name and part of her mythology is taken from the Zoroastrian divinity Spenta Armaiti.
Sandraudiga f Germanic Mythology
Sandraudiga is a Germanic goddess, attested on a stone with a Latin inscription, found in North Brabant, the Netherlands. The origin and meaning of her name are debated: theories include a derivation form Germanic *sanþ "true, real" and Gothic audags "rich; fortunate" and Old English *sand "sand" and Gothic rauds "red".
Sangiang Serri f Indonesian Mythology
From Indonesian sanghyang meaning "angel" and sri, a respectful title derived from Sanskrit श्री (śrī́) meaning "light, lustre, splendour". She is the Buginese goddess of rice and fertility and the equivalent of the Javanese, Balinese, and Sundanese deity Dewi Sri.
Sangríðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of sannr 'true, truthful' and gríð 'peace, protection, mercy, truce'. This is also the name of a Valkyrie.
Sankarsh m Hinduism, Indian
A name of the Hindu god Krishna.
Sanna f Inuit Mythology
Inuktitut form of Sedna.
Sanu m & f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese, Marathi, Punjabi
MEANING - top of mountain, mountain -ridge, table-land, Sun, sage
Sáráhkká f Sami, Sami Mythology
Combination of the male name Sárra and the word áhkká "wife, woman, mother". Sáráhkká is the goddess of childbirth in Sami mythology.
Sarankka f Hinduism
active and creative
Saranya f Hinduism, Indian, Tamil, Malayalam, Thai
From Sanskrit शरण्य (sharanya) meaning "protector, defender, refuge" or सरण्यु (saranyu) meaning "nimble, quick, agile". This is the name of a Hindu goddess.
Sarayu f Sanskrit, Hinduism
From the name of a river in North India that flows through Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh. Its name seems directly taken from the Sanskrit word सरयु (sarayu) meaning "air, wind".
Sariel m Hebrew, Judeo-Christian Legend
Apparently means "command of God" in Hebrew, making this name a variant or a shortened form of Zerachiel. This is the name of an angel mainly known in judaism, who was - among others - an angel of healing and a benevolent angel of death (it is said that he was sent to retrieve the soul of Moses).
Sarpanit f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Babylonian mother goddess and wife of Marduk. Her name means "the shining one" or may be derived from zēr-bānītu meaning "creatress of seed".
Šarruma m Near Eastern Mythology
Meaning "king of the mountains". Šarruma or Sharruma is originally a Hurrian god who was adopted into the Hittite pantheon.
Sassan m Persian Mythology
Considered the eponymous ancestor of the Sasanians, was "a great warrior and hunter" and a Zoroastrian high priest in Fars and living sometime near the fall of the Arsacid Empire.
Sassuma-arnaa f Mythology
Means "mother of the sea". This is the name of a character in Greenlandic mythology.
Sata f Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Vainakh goddess of artisanship and either the daughter or wife of the god Sela, similar to the Ossetian Satanaya... [more]
Satana f Ossetian Mythology
Ossetian variant of Satanaya.
Satanay f Caucasian Mythology
Karachay-Balkar form of Satanaya.
Satanaya f Caucasian Mythology
Means "mother of one-hundred (sons)" from Persian صد (sad) (through the Iranian root */sata-/) meaning "(one) hundred" combined with the Northwest Caucasian root /na/ meaning "mother" (descended into Kabardian анэ (ānă) and Adyghe ны (nə)) and the Indo-Iranian suffix /-ya/ meaning "the one who is"... [more]
Satet f Egyptian Mythology
Derived from the Egyptian word sṯ, meaning "eject", "shoot", "pour" or "throw". It is the name of an Egyptian goddess and her name can be translated as "she who shoots" or "she who pours". As a warrior goddess, she protected Egypt's southern frontier by killing the pharoah's enemies with arrows; as a fertility goddess, she granted the wishes of those who sought love.
Sathyanarayana m Hinduism
Name of God. God grants all wish if pooja done sincerely.
Satournous m Roman Mythology (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Saturnus (see Saturn).
Satyrion f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek satyros meaning "satyr" (see also Satyros). In Greek mythology, this was the name of a nymph who had a son with Poseidon.
Saubarag m Ossetian Mythology
Means "black rider" in Ossetian. This is the name of the Ossetian God of darkness and thieves, comparable to the Biblical figure Satan.
Saudamini f Hinduism
Sanskrit for "lightning"
Sauri m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Gujarati, Sinhalese, Kannada
MEANING - 'son of sun", a name of Saturn, Indian- Laurel, clammyweeds plant
Saurik f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Tamil, Telugu, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Gujarati, Marathi, Bengali
MEANING - Celestial, heavenly, paradise, relating to spirituous liquor
Saurimonda f Folklore, Medieval Occitan
From Old Occitan saur "blond" and mond "world". This is the name of an evil entity who manifested herself as a girl with fair hair and blue eyes.
Sausyryqo m Caucasian Mythology
West Circassian (Adyghe) form of Sosruko.
Savuska f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Hurrian goddess mentioned by the Assyrian king Sargon II.
Saynag-aldara f Ossetian Mythology
The mother of Agunda in the Ossetian 'Nart' sagas.
Scaea f Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek feminine name meaning "left, on the left hand".
Scamander m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Skamandros. In Greek mythology, this was the name of a river god, who is the personification of the Scamander River (nowadays called Karamenderes River), the largest river of the plain of Troy.
Scáthach f Irish Mythology
Possibly from Irish scáth meaning "shadow". In Irish legend she was the Scottish warrior woman who trained the Ulster hero Cúchulainn.... [more]
Sceafa m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Sceafa was a legendary Lombardic king from English legend.
Schedius m Greek Mythology
Derived from σχεδόν (skhedón) meaning "nearby" or "nearly, almost", and δίος (dîos) meaning "heavenly, divine".
Schletto m Germanic Mythology
Name of a giant who (according to the legend) founded the Alsatian city Sélestat (German name Schlettstadt).