Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Cinxia f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of conception. She functions within the belt (cingulum) that the bride wears to symbolize that her husband is "belted and bound" (cinctus vinctusque) to her. It was tied with the knot of Hercules, intended to be intricate and difficult to untie... [more]
Cinyras m Greek Mythology
Means "lyre" in Ancient Greek from the word kinýra. ... [more]
Cisa f Norse Mythology, Germanic Mythology
Derived from Proto-Germanic *Tīwaz, the same etymological root as Tyr, which evolved into Cyo and Ziu in Old High German.... [more]
Cisseus m Greek Mythology
Means "wreathe with ivy" in Greek. It is the name of several characters in Greek mythology.
Cleio f Greek Mythology
Name of the muse of history
Cleite f Greek Mythology
Means "renowned, famous" in Greek.
Cleoboea f Greek Mythology
Derived from κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory" and βοια (boea), of unknown meaning, perhaps refering to Boeotia.
Cleocharia f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
In Greek mythology, Cleocharia was a naiad and queen consort. She was the wife of King Lelex of Laconia and the mother of Myles and Polycaon.
Cleodora f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κλεοδωρα (Kleodora), which was derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" combined with δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology, she was a nymph of Mount Parnassos in Phokis... [more]
Cleodoxa f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κλεοδόξα (Kleodoxa), derived from the elements κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory" and δοξα (doxa) "notion, reputation, honour".
Cleola f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Dutch (Rare), English (Rare)
Latinized form of Kleola. In Greek mythology, Cleola is the name of a daughter of Dias, son of Pelops... [more]
Cleolaus m Greek Mythology
Derived from κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory" and λαος (laos) meaning "people".
Cleolinda f English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Literature
According to legend, St. George saved the Princess Cleolinda from death by taming the dragon and then killing it in exchange for the kingdom's conversion to Christianity.
Cleona f Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology, English (Rare)
Originally a Latinization of Kleone, this name is sometimes understood as a feminine form of Cleon in the English-speaking world.... [more]
Cleone f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kleone. She was the Naiad-nymph of the spring, well or fountain of the town of Kleonai (Cleonae) in Argos, southern Greece and a daughter of the river Asopos.
Cleostratus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kleostratos. This name was borne by an ancient Greek astronomer from the 5th century BC.
Cleta f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
In Greek mythology, Cleta was one of the Charites or Graces.
Climene f Greek Mythology
Italian form of Clymene.
Clota f Celtic Mythology
The Celtic goddess of the river Clyde.... [more]
Clydai f Welsh Mythology
The name of a Welsh saint of the 5th century, the reputed foundress of a church named Clydai, in Emlyn.
Clymene f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. The name of several characters of Greek Mythology, including an Oceanid (also called Asia in that case), as well as that of a type of dolphin.
Clymenus m Greek Mythology
A character in Greek Mythology. (used 10 times)
Clytie f English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Literature
Latinized form of Klytië. It was used by British author Joseph Hatton for the heroine of his novel 'Clytie' (1874), and borne by Australian opera singer Clytie Hine (1887–1983); it was also the birth name of Australian ceramic artist Klytie Pate (1912-2010)... [more]
Clytippe f Greek Mythology
One of the many daughters of Thespius and Megamede. She consorted with Heracles and gave birth to a son Eurycapys.
Clytodora f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". It is the name of two characters in Greek mythology.
Cōātlīcue f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Coatlicue (/kwɑːtˈliːkweɪ/; Classical Nahuatl: cōātl īcue, Nahuatl pronunciation: koːaːˈtɬíːkʷe, “skirt of snakes”),wife of Mixcōhuātl ,also known as Teteoh innan (Classical Nahuatl: tēteoh īnnān, pronounced teːˌtéoʔ ˈíːnːaːn̥, “mother of the gods”), is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war... [more]
Coatlicue f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "skirt of snakes" in Nahuatl. She is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. The goddesses Tocih “our grandmother”, and Cihuacoatl “snake woman”, the patron of women who die in childbirth, were also seen as aspects of Coatlicue.
Cochrann f Irish Mythology
Perhaps from Cróchnait, which was derived from Irish cróch "saffron, red" (from Latin crocus) combined with a diminutive suffix. In the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology Cochrann is a daughter of Cathaír Mór, king of Leinster, and the mother of Diarmaid and Oscar; in ballads the character is known as Cróchnat.
Cocytus m Greek Mythology
From Κωκυτός meaning "lamentation"
Codrus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κόδρος (Kodros), which is probably derived from Greek κυδρός (kudros) or (kydros) meaning "glorious, renowned, illustrious". In Greek mythology, Codrus was the name of a king of Athens.
Coeranus m Greek Mythology
Means "ruler, commander" in Greek.
Colel f Mayan Mythology
Colel Cab is the Mayan earth goddess associated with bees and beekeeping. Modern Maya Daykeepers invoke her name in chants to ward off attacks to nests and solve problems for hive keepers with their bees.
Colla m Scottish, Irish, Irish Mythology
This is said to have been the name of three warrior brothers who founded the Irish kingdom of Airgialla and whose descendents ruled the Scottish kingdom of Dal Riada. ... [more]
Comaetho f Greek Mythology
Means "bright haired" in Greek.
Comus m Greek Mythology
Greek god of revelry, merrymaking, festivity, nocturnal dalliances... [more]
Conomor m Breton Legend, History, Medieval Breton (?)
From a Brythonic name, possibly *Cunomāros, derived from Common Celtic *kwon- "hound" or *kuno- "high" and *māros ‎"great". This was the name of Conomor the Cursed, a 6th-century king of Domnonée (modern-day northern Brittany) notorious for his cruelty, who was ultimately excommunicated at the behest of Saint Samson of Dol... [more]
Consevius m Roman Mythology
The god of propagation and insemination, from con-serere, "to sow." It is a title of Janus as a creator god or god of beginnings.
Copreus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κοπρεύς (Kopreus), which is derived from Greek κόπρειος (kopreios) meaning "full of dung, filthy". In turn, it is ultimately derived from Greek κόπρος (kopros) meaning "excrement, dung"... [more]
Coria f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κοριη (Koriê), an epithet of the goddess Athena which was derived from κορη (korê) "maiden" (compare Korë, Corinna).
Cormoran m Folklore, Literature
Name of a legendary giant in Cornish folklore; he appears in the fairy tale 'Jack the Giant Killer'. The name was also used for the main character, Cormoran Strike, in 'The Cuckoo's Calling' (2013) by Robert Galbraith (J... [more]
Coroebus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Koroibos. A known bearer of this name was the Olympic victor Coroebus of Elis, who won the stadion race at the 1st Olympiad in 776 BC.
Corymbus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Κορυμβος (Korymbos) meaning "(a bunch of) ivy berries". He was the Greek demigod of the fruit of the ivy.
Coventina f Celtic Mythology
Coventina was a Romano-British goddess of wells and springs. She is known from multiple inscriptions at one site in Northumberland county of England, an area surrounding a wellspring near Carrawburgh on Hadrian's Wall... [more]
Coyolxāuhqui f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "painted with bells" in Nahuatl. This was the name of an Aztec goddess, the daughter of Cōātlīcue.
Cranaë f Greek Mythology
Means "stony" in Greek. It is the name of an island off the coast of Gytheio, where Paris of Troy and Helen spent their first night together in Greek mythology.
Cranaechme f Greek Mythology
Means "rocky point" in Greek. In Greek mythology, she is a daughter of Cranaus.
Cranaus m Greek Mythology
Means "rocky, rugged" in Greek. In Greek mythology, he was the second king of Athens.
Creiddylad f Welsh Mythology
From Creudylad or Creurdilad, which is probably from Welsh craidd "heart", or creu "to create, engender", or creir "a token, jewel, sacred object", combined with dylad, an ancient word for water (or possibly dyled "debt")... [more]
Creirdyddlydd f Welsh Mythology
Variant of Creurdilad (see Creiddylad).
Creirwy f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "token of the egg", and in effect "mundane egg", from Welsh creir "a token, jewel, sacred object" and wy "egg". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she was a daughter of Ceridwen and one of the three most beautiful maids of the Isle of Britain... [more]
Creon m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology
Latinized form of Kreon. This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a ruler of Thebes.
Crete f Greek Mythology
A mythological name of unknown meaning, possibly deriving from the Luvian *kursatta, meaning "island of silver" or "island of cutting." The name of several characters from Greek mythology including a daughter of Hesperus, the mother of Pasiphae, the wife of Minos, and a granddaughter of Deucalion.... [more]
Creus m Greek Mythology
means the sun or sun god
Creusa f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Latinized form of Greek Kreousa meaning "princess". This was the name of the first wife of Aeneas, who was killed in the sack of Troy and then appeared to her husband as a ghost, encouraging him to move on without her and seek a new city.
Criasus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kriasos. In Greek mythology, Criasus is the name of a king of Argos.
Crino f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Krino. This is the name of two characters in Greek mythology.
Cristalda f Folklore, Popular Culture
A dithematic name formed from the Greek name element christ "anointed" and the Germanic name element wald "to rule".... [more]
Ctesippus m Greek Mythology
Derived from κτᾰ́ομαι (ktáomai) meaning “to acquire” and ἵππος (híppos) meaning “horse”.
Ctesius m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ktesios. This is the name of two characters in Greek mythology, one of them being one of the suitors of Odysseus' wife Penelope.
Ctesylla f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Ctesylla (Κτήσυλλα) was a maiden of Ioulis in Ceos, daughter of Alcidamas. Derived from Greek κτῆσις (ktesis) meaning "acquisition, possession, property", which is ultimately derived from Greek κτάομαι (ktaomai) meaning "to acquire, to procure for oneself" as well as "to possess".
Ctimene f Greek Mythology
The younger sister of Odysseus, the legendary king of Ithaca.
Cuba f Roman Mythology
Goddess who helped the child transition from cradle to bed.
Cunina f Roman Mythology
The goddess who protected the cradle from malevolent magic.
Cupidon m Roman Mythology (Gallicized), Literature, French (African, Rare)
French form of Cupid. It was mentioned in Marquis de Sade's novel 'The 120 Days of Sodom' (1785) as belonging to one of the male victims.
Curche m Baltic Mythology
Old Prussian god first mentioned in the peace treaty of 1249 between the Teutonic Knights and the Old Prussians. He is also mentioned in Simon Grunau's Preussische Chronik (1517-1521) and Matthäus Prätorius' Deliciae Prussicae (1635-1704).
Cyane f French, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυανη (Kyane) which was derived from κυανος (kyanos) "cyan, azure-blue" (compare Cyan). In Greek myth she was the Naiad nymph of a spring in the Sicilian town of Syracuse, who dissolved away into the spring from grief after witnessing Hades' abduction of her playmate Persephone.
Cyanippus m Greek Mythology
Derived from κῠ́ᾰνος (kúanos) meaning “dark-blue enamel” or "dark-blue coloured" and ἵππος (híppos) meaning “horse”.
Cyborea f Judeo-Christian Legend
Name of the mother of Judas Iscariot in apocryphal Christian scriptures, most notably in "The Golden Legend".
Cydippe f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kydippe. This is the name of several characters from Greek mythology, one of which is a Nereid.
Cydon m Greek Mythology
Derived from κυδώνι (kydóni) meaning "quince".
Cyllene f Greek Mythology
Alternate English form of Kyllene.
Cymopolea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυμοπόλεια (Kymopoleia) meaning "wave walker", derived from κῦμα (kyma) "wave, billow" and the verb πολέω (poleô) "to go about, range over"... [more]
Cynosura f Astronomy, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνόσουρα (Kynosoura) which meant "dog's tail", a derivative of κύων (kyôn) "dog" (genitive κυνός (kynos)) and οὐρά (oura) "tail"... [more]
Cyparissus m Greek Mythology
Means "cypress" in Greek. In Greek mythology, he was a boy beloved by Apollo.
Cypselus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kypselos. This was the name of a tyrant of Corinth from the 7th century BC.
Cyrene f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Κυρηνη (Kyrene), possibly from Greek κῦρος (kuros) "supreme power". This was the name of a nymph loved by Apollo in Greek mythology. She was a huntress on Mount Pelion, in Thessaly, but Apollo carried her to what is now Libya, where he founded the city of Cyrene in her honour... [more]
Cytherea f Greek Mythology
Epithet of Aphrodite, taken from the name of the island Cytherea, which was sacred to her.
Daena f Persian Mythology
The name of a Zoroastrian divinity, taken from the Gathic Avestan daēnā or Sanskrit dhénā and is variously translated as "conscience", "religion", "understanding" or "that which is observed"... [more]
Daesenor m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Daisenor. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the suitors of Penelope.
Daeva m & f Sanskrit, Hinduism
Alternate transcription of Sanskrit देव (see Deva).
Dahud f Breton Legend
Possibly derived from Breton da meaning "good" and hud "magic". In Breton legend this was the name of a princess, the daughter of the king of the mythical sunken city of Ys. She was portrayed as a wicked sorceress in some versions of the legends.
Daikokutennyo f Japanese Mythology
The Japanese form of the goddess Mahakali or a feminine form of Daikokuten, the god of great blackness or darkness... [more]
Daimon m Greek Mythology, English (American)
As a modern English name, this is used as a variant of Damon.
Dain m Literature, Norse Mythology
Dain II Ironfoot was the Lord of the Iron Hills and King Under the Mountain in J.R.R. Tolkien's works. Tolkien derived it from Dáinn, the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Dáinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "died". This is the name of three characters in Norse mythology: a dwarf, a representative of the elves, and one of the stags that graze on the branches of Yggdrasill.
Daiphron m Greek Mythology
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It could be derived from the Greek verb δαίω (daio) meaning "to divide" or from the related Greek verb δαίζω (daizo) meaning "to cleave (asunder)"... [more]
Daira f Greek Mythology, Spanish (Latin American)
The name of an Okeanid Nymph of the town in Eleusis in Attika, Greece. It is derived from the element δαο (dao), meaning "the knowing one, teacher".
Daisenor m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is uncertain, as there are several possible etymologies for it. It could be derived from the Greek noun δάϊς (dais) meaning "war, battle", but it could also be derived from the Greek noun δαΐς (dais) meaning "torch" as well as "pinewood"... [more]
Daiva m & f Sanskrit, Hinduism
Alternate transcription of Sanskrit देव (see Deva).
Dali f Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Dali was the Georgian goddess of the hunt, mother of Amirani, and was believed to be extraordinarily beautiful. She lived on top of a mountain and protected animals, occasionally allowing hunters to hunt animals just so long as they don't hunt more than necessary... [more]
Dalkiel m Judeo-Christian Legend (Rare)
A demon first mentioned by Joseph Gikatilla ben Abraham (1248-1305) in his book "Baraita de Massachet Gehinnom".... [more]
Dal-nim f Korean Mythology
In Korean mythology, she is the moon. She is the sister to the sun, Hae-nim.
Damara f Celtic Mythology
The name of a Celtic fertility goddess. Though unconnected, this is also the name of an ethnic group who live in Namibia, Africa.
Damasen m Greek Mythology
Means "tamer, subduer", derived from Greek damazô (or damasô) "to subdue" (compare Damian, Damon). This was the name of a giant hero in Lydian myth whom the Greeks may have identified with Herakles... [more]
Damasichthon m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δαμασίχθων (damasichthon) meaning "earth-subduer", which consists of the Greek verb δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame, to subdue, to overpower, to kill" (see Damasos) and the Greek noun χθών (chthon) meaning "ground, soil" as well as "earth, world".... [more]
Damasippos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective δαμάσιππος (damasippos) meaning "horse-taming", which consists of the Greek verb δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame, to subdue, to overpower, to kill" (see Damasos) and the Greek noun ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse".
Damasippus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Roman
Latinized form of Damasippos. A known bearer of this name was the Roman commander Lucius Junius Brutus Damasippus (1st century BC).
Damastor m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "tamer".
Damia f Greek Mythology
The name of the Hora of the fertile earth, and alternatively a title of the goddess Demeter (while her daughter, Persephone, was occasionally afforded the title Auxesia)... [more]
Damia f Roman Mythology
Epithet of the goddess Bona Dea. Paulus Diaconus derived the name from Greek δαμόσιος (damosios) "public".
Damkina f Near Eastern Mythology
The Akkadian goddess derived from Damgalnuna. She was the consort of Enki and mother of the god Marduk... [more]
Damona f Celtic Mythology
In Gallo-Roman religion, Damona was a goddess worshipped in Gaul as the consort of Apollo Borvo and of Apollo Moritasgus. Her name is likely derived from Old Irish dam "cow, ox".
Danais f Greek Mythology
The name of a naiad of a well or fountain in the region of Pisa in Elis, Greece. Her name is ultimately derived from δαναίος (danaios) meaning "long lived".
Danaos m Greek Mythology
Masculine form of Danaë.
Danaus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Danaos. In Greek mythology, Danaus was the twin brother of Aegyptus and son of Achiroe and Belus.
Danina f Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown, though it is presumed to be a combination of Georgian da and nana. Danina--along with Ainina in a pair--is a Georgian goddess.
Dankwart m German (Rare, Archaic), Germanic Mythology
Formed from the German name elements DANK "thought" and WART "guard".... [more]
Daphnis m Greek Mythology
From Greek δάφνη, meaning "laurel tree". In Greek mythology, Daphnis was the son of Hermes and an unnamed nymph. His mother left him under a laurel tree, where he was found by a shepherd and named after the tree... [more]
Darana m & f Indigenous Australian, Indigenous Australian Mythology
According to the legend of the Aboriginals, the original settlers of Australia, Darana was one of the Deities during Dreamtime (the time before humans occupied Earth).... [more]
Dartsa-naana f Caucasian Mythology
Means "blizzard mother" in Vainakh. Dartsa-Naana was the Chechen and Ingush goddess of blizzards and avalanches. Like Sela, she lives on top of Mount Kazbek.
Dascylus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "teacher, instructor".
Dasharatha m Hinduism
Means "possessing ten chariots" from Sanskrit दश (dasha) meaning "ten" and रथ (ratha) meaning "chariot". In the Hindu epic the Ramayana he is the king of Ayodhya and the father of the hero Rama.
Dastan m Persian Mythology, Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Means "story, legend" in Persian. This is another name for Zal, a character in the Shahnameh epic.
Davith m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali, Sinhalese, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Fijian, Bengali, Marathi, Gujarati
MEANING : a handsome man conversant with every branch of learning, a wooden antelope ... [more]
Daxenaghwe f Caucasian Mythology
Derived from Circassian дахэ (dāxă) meaning "beautiful, pretty" and нагъуэ (năġ°ă) meaning "brown-eyed". Daxenaghwe is a minor character in the Circassian Nart sagas.
Dealgnait f Celtic Mythology
Dealgnait was the name of a minor goddess worshipped in Deal, Kent in present-day England. Her functions are not entirely clear: it has been specualted that she was either a fertility goddess or a goddess of death.
Decluna f Roman Mythology
An important goddess (or perhaps god, known as Declunus) of the Volscians, an ancient people of Italy who were frequently at war with the Romans and subsequently conquered and assimilated... [more]
Declunus m Roman Mythology
An important god (or perhaps goddess, known as Decluna) of the Volscians, an ancient people of Italy who were frequently at war with the Romans and subsequently conquered and assimilated... [more]
Deepesh m Sanskrit, Hinduism
Derived from Sanskrit. ... [more]
Deidamia f Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), Theatre
From Greek Δηιδάμεια (Deidameia), possibly derived from δηιόω (dêioô) "to destroy" (cf. Deianira) and δαμάζειν (damazein) "to tame"... [more]
Deilochos m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Epic Greek adjective δήϊος (deios) meaning "hostile, destructive" as well as "unhappy, wretched". It is related to the Greek verb δηϊόω (deioo) meaning "to slay, to cut down" (see Deianeira).... [more]
Deilochus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Deilochos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of two separate characters who were both slain by Tydeus during the War of the Seven against Thebes.
Deimachus m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
A noted bearer is Deimachus, a Greek of the Seleucid Empire who lived during the third-century BCE. He became an ambassador to the court of Bindusara "Amitragata" (son of Chandragupta Maurya) in Pataliputra in India.... [more]
Deino m Greek Mythology
Variation of Dino.
Deioneus m Greek Mythology
Said to mean "ravager" from Greek δηιόω (dêioô) "to cut down, slay; to waste or ravage a country" (compare the first element in Deianeira). This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology.
Deiphobe f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Deiphobos. In Greek and Roman mythology, Deiphobe was a daughter of the seer Glaukos, an oracle of Apollo at Cumae in Italy, and later became known as the Cumaean Sybil... [more]
Deiphobos m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Epic Greek adjective δήϊος (deios) meaning "hostile, destructive" as well as "unhappy, wretched". It is related to the Greek verb δηϊόω (deioo) meaning "to slay, to cut down" (see Deianeira)... [more]
Deiphobus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Deiphobos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the sons of king Priam of Troy.
Deipyle f Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, perhaps derived from δηιόω (dêioô) meaning "to destroy" and πῠ́λη (pule) meaning "gate, door".
Deisenor m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δεισήνωρ (deisenor) meaning "fearing man", which consists of the Greek verb δείδω (deido) meaning "to fear, to dread" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".... [more]
Deityche f Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, perhaps derived from δηιόω (dêioô) meaning "to destroy" and τῠ́χη (túkhē) meaning "an act of god, fate, fortune".
Dejanira f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Polish, Portuguese
Variant transcription of Deianira. This was the form used for the main belt asteroid 157 Dejanira (discovered in 1875 by French astronomer Alphonse Borrelly).
Dēkla f Baltic Mythology, Latvian (Rare)
Dēkla is a Latvian goddess of fate and the sister of the goddesses Laima and Kārta. In old Latvian folk songs Laima and Dēkla are often considered one and the same goddess and their names are used interchangeably... [more]
Dela m Caucasian Mythology
Means "god, deity" in Chechen. In Chechen mythology, Dela was the supreme god who created the earth. In modern times, his name is sometimes used to refer to Allah, the Islamic God.
Dela-malkh m Caucasian Mythology
Means "sun god" from Chechen дела (dela) meaning "god" and малх (malkh) meaning "sun, solar". This was the name of the sun god in Chechen and Ingush mythology.
Dellingr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse dellingr meaning "luminous, shining one". Dellingr is the name of a dwarf in the Þulur
Delos m Greek Mythology, Literature, Mythology, English
In Greek myth, a Lydian ship was sailing for the island of Delos. When the crew captures Dionysus, he finds himself sailing toward the island.... [more]
Delphos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek word adelphos, meaning "brother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a man whom the name of the Greek city is derived from. It can also be interpreted as the Greek masculine form of Delphine.
Demaratus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Demaratos. This name was borne by a king of Sparta, who lived in the 5th century BC.
Demiurgos m Gnosticism
From Ancient Greek Δημιουργός (Demiourgos) meaning "public worker" or "skilled worker" from the Greek elements demos "common people" and ergos "work". In the Gnostic system this is the name of the creator of the material world (and sometimes of evil), a deity inferior to the Supreme Being.
Democoön m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Demokoon. In Greek mythology, this is the name of an illegitimate son of king Priam of Troy, who was killed by Odysseus during the Trojan War.
Demodice f Greek Mythology
Derived from δημος (demos) meaning "the people" and δικη (dike) meaning "justice".
Demodocus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Demodokos. A notable bearer of this name was the ancient Greek poet Demodocus of Leros (6th century BC).... [more]
Demodokos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" combined with the Greek noun δόκος (dokos) meaning "opinion, belief". Also compare the related Greek verb δοκέω (dokeo) meaning "to expect" as well as "to think, to imagine, to suppose" (see Eudocia).
Demokoon m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δῆμος (demos) meaning "people" as well as "country, land" combined with κοῶ (koo), which is a contracted form of the Greek verb κοέω (koeo) meaning "to know, to be aware" as well as "to mark, to perceive, to hear"... [more]
Demoleon m Greek Mythology
Means "lion of the people", derived from Greek δημος (demos) "the people" combined with Greek λεων (leon) "lion". In Greek mythology, Demoleon is the name of a centaur.
Demonassa f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Demonax. This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of whom was a princess.
Demonice f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Demonike. In Greek mythology, this is the name of two characters, one of which is an Aetolian princess.
Demoptolemos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" combined with the Epic Greek noun πτόλεμος (ptolemos) meaning "war".
Demoptolemus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Demoptolemos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the suitors of Penelope.
Derbforgaill f Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
From Gaelic Der bForgaill, which apparently meant "daughter of Forgall". It may be an earlier form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile... [more]
Dérgréine f Irish Mythology
Means "tear of the sun", composed of Old Irish dér "tear" and grían "the sun" (genitive gréine; compare Aoibhgréine). In Irish legend Dér Gréine was the daughter of Fiachna Mac Retach, who married Laoghaire Mac Crimthann of Connacht.
Despoine f Greek Mythology
Means “lady, queen, mistress (of a household)” in Greek, derived from Proto-Indo-European *dems-pota- (“house-powerful”). This was an epithet or title of the Greek goddesses Persephone, Artemis and Hekate, and the common name of a Greek fertility goddess who was worshipped alongside her mother Demeter in an Arcadian mystery-cult; her true name was revealed only to the initiates... [more]
Deucalion m Greek Mythology
In Greek legend he was the son of Prometheus and Pronoia.
Deucalion m Greek Mythology
A figure out of Greek mythology, recorded only in later Roman sources. In most accounts, Deucalion and his wife Pyrrha are the only survivors of a great flood... [more]
Deva f Asturian, Galician, Spanish (Modern), Celtic Mythology
From the name of a river that flows through Asturias. It was named after Deva, the Celtic goddess of waters. Her name is derived from Celtic deva "goddess" or "divine", itself derived from Proto-Celtic *dēwā “goddess”.
Deva m & f Sanskrit, Hinduism
Meaning "deity" in Sanskrit, referring to any benevolent spirit or supernatural being. The devas (also known as suras) in Hinduism maintaine the realms as ordained by the Trimurti and are often warring with their equally powerful counterparts, the Asuras... [more]
Devadut m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Marathi, Bengali
Name - Devadut Devadoot देवदूत... [more]
Devana f Slavic Mythology
Czech goddess of the hunt.
Devanshu m Hinduism
Closely related with the feminine name Devanshi "part of god".
Deverra f Roman Mythology
Goddess who gives the broom with which grain was swept up (verrere) (compare Averruncus).
Dewila f Hinduism
Name - Dewila देविला... [more]
Dewi Sri f Indonesian Mythology
From Indonesian dewi meaning "goddess", ultimately from Sanskrit देवी (devi), and sri, a title of respect derived from Sanskrit श्री (shri)... [more]
Dexamenus m Greek Mythology
Means "hospitable" in Greek. It is the name of three characters in Greek mythology.
Dexios m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δέξις (dexis) meaning "reception", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb δέχομαι (dechomai) meaning "to take, to receive, to accept, to welcome"... [more]
Dexithea f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Dexitheos. In Greek mythology, Dexithea was one of the Telchines.
Dexius m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Dexios. In Greek mythology, Dexius was the father of the Achaean Iphinous.
Dhakhan m Indigenous Australian Mythology
The ancestral spirit of the Kabi tribe of Queensland (north-east Australia).
Dharun m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Marathi, Indian, Nepali, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu
MEANING -bearing, holding, supporter, Name of lord Brahma ( ब्रह्मा ),heaven, water, opinion, basis, foundation, firm ground, the firm soil of the earth, prop, stay, receptacle... [more]
Dhisana f Hinduism
Etymology unknown. This is the name of a Hindu goddess of prosperity associated with the soma vessel, knowledge, intelligence and speech as well as celestial bodies.
Dhruv m Hinduism (Modern)
Name of Star
Dia f Greek Mythology
Means "heavenly, divine" in Greek. The name of multiple characters in Greek Mythology.
Dianus m Roman Mythology
Masculine form of Diana. This was the name of an obscure god in Roman mythology. Some experts theorize that Dianus is not a separate god on his own; they claim that Dianus is merely a different name for Ianus (see Janus).
Dice f Greek Mythology (Latinized), English (Rare)
Latinized form of Dike. It was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world of the 1800s.
Dictynna f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Δίκτυννα (Diktynna) which was associated with Greek δίκτυα (diktya) "hunting nets". This was an epithet of the Cretan goddess Britomartis, allegedly given for the fishermen's nets into which she leaped from Mount Dikte on Crete... [more]
Dictys m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Δίκτυς (Diktys) meaning "of the nets", from δίκτυον (diktyon) "fishing-net". This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, notably the fisherman of the island Seriphos who "with his net drew to land the chest in which were enclosed Perseus and his mother Danaë".
Diespiter m Roman Mythology
Variant of Jupiter, also known as Jove, a god who brings the birthing baby toward the daylight.
Dietlieb m Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
In the "King Laurin Legend" Dietlieb is Similde's brother, Dietrich von Bern's friend and one of the knights to fight the dwarf king.... [more]
Dilga f Indigenous Australian Mythology
The earth goddess of the Karadjeri of northwestern Australia.
Diomedeia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Διος (Dios) meaning "of Zeus" and μηδομαι (medomai) meaning "to think, to plan".
Dioneta f Arthurian Romance, Welsh Mythology
The name of two persons mentioned in the fourteenth-century fragmentary Welsh text known as The Birth of Arthur.... [more]
Diopatre f Greek Mythology
The name of a naiad of a spring of the river Sperkheios on Mount Othrys in Malis (northern Greece). She was loved by the god Poseidon, who transformed her sisters into poplar-trees in order to seduce her unhindered... [more]
Diope f Greek Mythology
Diope was the daughter of Triptolemos. The name itself derives from Διος (Dios) meaning "of Zeus" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye".
Diptiman m Hinduism, Indian
Diptiman is pronounced as Dįptimān. It is a Hindi/Sanskrit term meaning illuminated. ... [more]
Dirce f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Δίρκη (Dirkê), which is of uncertain meaning, possibly derived from Greek δι- (di-) "two, twofold, in two" and ῥήγνυμι (rhêgnumi) "to break asunder, rend, shatter"... [more]
Dirvolira f Baltic Mythology
Lithuanian goddess whose name and function are a complete mystery. She was recorded in documents written by Jesuit monks between 1580 and 1620.
Discordia f Roman Mythology
Means "discord, dissension" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of strife, equivalent to the Greek goddess Eris.
Dishana f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian, Fijian, Tamil, Punjabi, Marathi, Mauritian, Malayalam
MEANING - an instructor in sacred knowledge
Dishani f Indian, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi
MEANING - an instructor in sacred knowledge
Dith m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Indian, Kannada, Nepali, Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, Fijian, American, Sinhalese
MEANING : a handsome dark - complexioned man convesant with every branch of learning , a wooden elephant ... [more]
Dius m Greek Mythology
Derived from Δῖος (dios) meaning "divine".
Divona f Celtic Mythology
Meaning "divinity" from the Gaulish 'deuos'. ... [more]
Divyae m Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Malayalam, Gujarati, American, Punjabi, Tamil, Sinhalese
Name - Divyae दिव्य... [more]
Divyani f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Nepali, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Bengali, Malayalam, Gujarati, Assamese, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
MEANING - Divine, celestial, heavenly, magical, agreeable ... [more]
Dock m Norse Mythology (Rare), American (Rare)
To anchor water going vessels. Means to be strong and secure. To unite others.
Dodone f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Dodone was said to be one of the Oceanid nymphs (the daughters of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys), after whom the ancient city of Dodona was named. The 6th century AD grammarian Stephanus of Byzantium (s.v. Δωδὠνη),1 writes that according to Thrasyboulos (FHG II 464, a), as reported by Epaphroditus (fr... [more]
Dofri m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. Possibly related to the word dofrar ("dale, valley"), or a word meaning "lazy one". In Norse mythology this is the name of a giant who lives on the mountain Dofrafjall.
Dolgþrasi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from dolg ("hostility, battle") and þrasa ("to snort, to boast"). This is the name of a dwarf (also called Dolgþvari) in Norse mythology.
Dolgþvari m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from dolg ("battle") and þvari ("staff, sword, spear"). This is the name of a dwarf (also called Dolgþrasi) in Norse mythology.
Dolion m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective δόλιος (dolios) meaning "crafty, deceitful, treacherous", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb δολιόω (dolioo) meaning "to lure, to deceive, to use deceit"... [more]
Dolios m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective δόλιος (dolios) meaning "crafty, deceitful, treacherous", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb δολιόω (dolioo) meaning "to lure, to deceive, to use deceit"... [more]
Dolius m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Dolios. In Greek mythology, Dolius is one of Penelope's slaves.
Dolon m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δόλος (dolos), which literally means "bait" and has a figurative meaning of "deceit, guile, treachery, trickery". For more information, please see Dolos... [more]
Dolopion m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek verb δολοπεύω (dolopeuo) meaning "to plot", which itself is closely related to the Greek verb δολόω (doloo) meaning "to beguile, to ensnare" as well as "to corrupt, to adulterate"... [more]
Dolos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun δόλος (dolos), which literally means "bait" and has a figurative meaning of "deceit, guile, treachery, trickery". The word is ultimately derived from the Greek verb δολόω (doloo) meaning "to beguile, to ensnare" as well as "to corrupt, to adulterate"... [more]
Dolus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Dolos. In Greek mythology, Dolus is the spirit of trickery and guile.
Dolya f Bulgarian, Slavic Mythology
Goddess of fate in East Slavic Mythology, personification of the fate bestowed upon a man at birth. She is described as a plainly dressed woman able to turn herself into various shapes. When she is positive she is named Dolya, when negative she turns into Nedolya.
Domalde m Norse Mythology, Scandinavian
Modern Scandinavian form of Dómaldi, which is a variant form of the Old Norse name Dómaldr.... [more]
Dómaldi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic (Archaic)
Variant of Dómaldr. Dómaldi was a legendary Swedish king who appears in the epic works 'Heimskringla' and 'Ynglinga saga' written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson.
Domar m Norse Mythology, Scandinavian, Swedish (Rare)
Modern Scandinavian form of both Dómari and Dómarr. However, when used in the context of Norse mythology, it strictly refers to the latter name.... [more]
Domiduca f Roman Mythology
The goddess Domiduca protects children on the way back to their parents' home. Her male counterpart was Domitius, Domidius or Domiducus, from domus, "house," and eo, ire, itum, "to go."... [more]
Donbettyr m Ossetian Mythology
Probably from Ossetian дон (don) meaning "water, river" combined with a form of the given name Peter. In Ossetian mythology, this is the name of the god of water and the patron of fishermen.
Dongwanggong m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 东 (dōng, meaning “eastern”), 王 (wáng, meaning “royal”) and 公 (gōng, meaning “duke”, “lord” or “father”). Dongwanggong was the male counterpart of Xiwangmu who ruled in the east and was associated with Yang energy (as opposed to Xiwangmu’s Yin)... [more]
Dora f Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Tamil, Hinduism, Telugu, Marathi, Kannada, Bengali, Malayalam, Sinhalese, Nepali, Gujarati
MEANING : A fillet of thread or cord tied round the arm or wrist; it is also applied to the string tying a packet or parcel; string... [more]
Dornröschen f Folklore (Germanized)
The name of the 'Sleeping Beauty' in the German fairy tale 'Little Briar Rose' by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, meaning "thorny little rose".
Doryclus m Greek Mythology
Derived from δόρῠ (doru) meaning "wood, tree" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory".
Dotis m & f Greek Mythology
Dotis (male), son of Asterius and Amphictyone (herself daughter of Phthius)... [more]
Dracaena f English, Greek Mythology
Means "she-dragon". Latinized form of the Ancient Greek drakaina (δράκαινα) 'she-dragon', a feminine form of drakōn (δράκων) 'dragon'. Dracaena is a genus of about forty species of trees and succulant shrubs, as well as a genus of lizards.... [more]
Draupnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "goldsmith". Draupnir is the name of both a dwarf and Odin's golden arm ring, which he laid on Baldr's funeral pyre to show that Hel was the legitimate ruler of the Underworld... [more]
Drengr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Drængr. This is the name of one of Karl and Snør's sons in Norse mythology.
Drífa f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Old Norse name meaning "fall of snow, snowdrift". In Norse mythology, Drífa was a daughter of king Snær. She had two sisters, Mjǫll and Fǫnn and one brother, Þorri.
Drisana f & m English (Rare), Hinduism (?), Indian (Rare, Expatriate, ?), Various (?)
Meaning uncertain, though popularly claimed to mean "daughter of the sun" in Sanskrit. Supposedly it occurs in Hindu mythology as a name (perhaps a title or epithet) of the Dānava demon Virochana (a son of Prahlāda and father of Bali)... [more]
Drǫfn f Norse Mythology
Means "wave, billow" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology, Drǫfn was the daughter of Ægir and Rán. She was sometimes referred to as Bára, also meaning "wave, billow".
Drosera f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek δρόσος (drosos) meaning "dew, dewdrops". This was the name of a naiad in Greek myth.
Druantia f Popular Culture, Celtic Mythology
Hypothetic old Celtic form of the name of a river in the south of France commonly known as the Durance, which is of unknown meaning. An Indo-European root meaning "to flow" has been suggested. According to Robert Graves in 'The White Goddess' (1948), it is derived from the Indo-European root *deru meaning "oak" (as are the words druid and dryad) and probably also belonged to a Gallic tree goddess, which he identifies as "Queen of the Druids" and "Mother of the Tree Calendar"... [more]
Drvaspa f Persian Mythology
The name of a Zoroastrian goddess whose name means "with solid horses". Her role in ancient religion is unknown.
Dryas m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "oak".
Dryope f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek δρῦς (drys) meaning "tree, oak" combined with Greek οψ (ops) "voice" or Greek ωψ (ops) "face, eye". This name was borne by at least five characters in Greek mythology, the best known being the daughter of king Dryops of Oeta, who was turned into a black poplar tree by the god Apollo.
Dryops m Greek Mythology
This name is either derived from Greek δρύοψ (dryops) meaning "woodpecker", or it is a masculine form of Dryope. This name was borne by two characters in Greek mythology: one was king Dryops of Oeta, the other was a son of king Priam of Troy.
Duamutef m Egyptian Mythology
Means "who adores his mother". He is one of the four sons of Horus tasked with protecting his throne in the underworld. His image was depicted on the canopic jar which held the stomach of the deceased.
Duellona f Roman Mythology
Older form of Bellona, derived from Early Latin duellum "war".
Dúfa f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "pitching wave" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology, Dúfa was one of nine daughters of Ægir and Rán.
Dúfr m Norse Mythology
Either derived from Old Norse dúfa "to drive" or means "sleepy one", related to Norwegian duva. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Duimelijntje f Folklore
Dutch form of Thumbelina, which is derived from Dutch duim meaning "thumb" combined with the Dutch diminutive suffixes -lijn and -tje.
Duli f Sanskrit, Indian (Christian), Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Nepali, Telugu, Tamil, Bengali
MEANING : a kind of pot-herb... [more]
Dumah m Biblical, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "silent" in Hebrew. Briefly mentioned in the Old Testament as the name of one of Ishmael's sons. In Rabbinical Literature, Dumah is also the angel of silence and of the stillness of death.
Durin m Germanic Mythology, Literature
The oldest dwarf in the works of Tolkien. A line of dwarf kings bore this name.... [more]
Durinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning "sleepy one" from Old Norse dúra meaning "nap, take a nap" and "door-keeper" from Old Norse dyrr meaning "door opening, doorway". This is the name of a dwarf.
Dvalarr m Norse Mythology
Variant of Dvalinn. This is the name of a stag in Norse mythology, probably identical to Dvalinn.
Dvalinn m Norse Mythology
Old Norse name meaning "the one slumbering". Possibly derived from the same word as Swedish dvala and Danish and Norwegian dvale, meaning "sleep, hibernation". ... [more]
Dwalin m Literature, Germanic Mythology
The name of a dwarf character in 'The Hobbit' by J. R. R. Tolkien. Tolkien took the name from the catalogue of dwarves (dvergatal) in the 'Poetic Edda'. The name means something like "sleeping" (from Old Norse dvalen "to sleep").
Dwyn m Celtic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Celtic god of love.
Dwynwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly from the name of the Celtic god of love, Dwyn combined with the Welsh element gwyn "blessed, white, fair"; or derived from Welsh dwyn "to lead (a life)", in which case it means "to a lead a blessed life"... [more]
Dynamene f Greek Mythology, Theatre
Means "she who can" or "the capable one" from Greek δυναμένη (dynamenê), a participle of the verb δύναμαι (dynamai) "to be able, to have power, be strong enough". In Greek mythology this name was borne by one of the Nereids... [more]
Dyrrhachius m Greek Mythology
A son of Poseidon and Melissa, from whom the town of Dyrrachium derived its name; for formerly it was called Epidamnus, after the father of Melissa. (Paus. vi. 10, in fin.; Steph. Byz. s. v. Durrachion.)
Dysis f Greek Mythology
Means "sunset" in Greek. She was the eleventh of the twelve Horae, goddesses of the hours, who presided over the hour of sunset.
Dysnomia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek dys "bad, wrong, difficult" and Greek nomos "custom, tradition, moral law". In Greek mythology, Dysnomia is the personification of lawlessness.
Dzerassa f Ossetian Mythology, Ossetian
Possibly means "golden-haired, shining", perhaps related to Persian زر (zar) meaning "gold". In Ossetian mythology Dzerassa is the daughter of the sea god Donbettyr.
Eachna f Irish Mythology
A daughter of a king of Connacht, she was renowned for both her beauty and her fashion sense.... [more]
Earendel m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Old English cognate of the Germanic name Auriwandalo, from Proto-Germanic *Auziwandilaz, composed of *auzi "dawn" and *wandilaz "wandering, fluctuating, variable"... [more]
Ecgþēow m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
The name of the father of Beowulf, meaning "edge-servant" or "sword-thane", espressing proficiency with a sword.
Echephron m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Greek verb ἔχω (echo) meaning "to have, to hold, to possess". The second element is derived from either the Greek noun φρόνις (phronis) meaning "prudence, wisdom" or the Greek verb φρονέω (phroneo) meaning "to think" as well as "to be minded"... [more]
Echeyde m Guanche Mythology, Spanish (Canarian)
Echeide or Echeyde is the name that the Aboriginal Guanches gave to Teide, a volcano in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). As most of the chroniclers transmitted, the Guanches (aboriginal people from Tenerife) conceived of the mountain as the place that housed the forces of evil, mainly the evil figure of Guayota... [more]
Echidna f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἔχιδνα (echidna) meaning "she-viper" (strictly feminine form of ἔχις (echis) "viper"). In Greek mythology Echidna was a monster, half woman and half snake... [more]
Echion m Greek Mythology
This name is either derived from Greek ἔχις (echis) meaning "viper" or from Greek ἔχω (echo) meaning "to have, to hold, to possess". Echion is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a suitor of Penelope.
Edern m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance, Medieval Breton, Breton
Derived from Old Welsh edyrn "immense; heavy; prodigious, wonderful, marvellous", in the past this name has been (falsely) considered a derivation from Latin aeternus "eternal".... [more]
Edha f Sanskrit, Indian, Tamil, Hindi, American, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Kannada, Gujarati, Marathi, Hinduism, Sinhalese, Nepali, Telugu
MEANING - "spread, prosper,rise, grow strong, become happy". This is feminine form of Sanskrit word एध/एध्... [more]
Edhita f Sanskrit, Gujarati, Hindi, Bengali, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Indian (Sikh), Nepali, Punjabi, Assamese
MEANING - to increase, prosper, grow strong, rise, bless... [more]
Edusa f Roman Mythology
A goddess who enables the taking of nourishment. The variations of her name may indicate that while her functional focus was narrow, her name had not stabilized; she was mainly a divine force to be invoked ad hoc for a specific purpose... [more]
Eeraj m Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati
MEANING- "son of wind-god", a Name of lord Hanuman. Here ईर means air, wind-god + ज means born... [more]
Eerit m Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Bengali
Name- Eerit ईरित... [more]
Eeyeekalduk m Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Eeyeekalduk was the god of medicine and good health.