Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Efnisien m Welsh Mythology
From the welsh efnys, meaning "hostile, enemy". This name was borne by the son of Llyr's wife Penarddun by Euroswydd, who eventually causes the fall of Ireland when his half-sister Branwen is married off to the Irish king Matholwch without his permission.
Efrog m Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Ebraucus. He was a legendary king of the Britons, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. He was the son of King Mempricius before he abandoned the family.
Egeria f Roman Mythology
Possibly connected to Greek αἴγειρος (aigeiros) meaning "black poplar", a type of tree (species Populus nigra). In Roman mythology this was the name of a nymph best known for her liaisons with Numa Pompilius, the legendary second king of Rome (after Romulus)... [more]
Eh m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Hindi
Name - Eh एह... [more]
Ehuang f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "fairy radiance". In Chinese folk religion, she and her twin sister, Yuhing, are goddesses or spirits of the Xiang River.
Eido f Greek Mythology, Literature
Meaning 'beauty'.... [more]
Eidothea f Greek Mythology
The name of a nymph desired by Poseidon. The name is derived from the suffix element ειδο (eido-), perhaps meaning "knowing" or "shapely", and the element θεα (thea) meaning "goddess".
Eidyia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek εἶδος (eidos) meaning "to see" or "to know". In Greek mythology she was the mother of the sorceress Medea, and may have personified 'the magical power of the eye, which in Greek superstition was the source of the witch's supernatural power - strengthened by the beams of the ancestral sun.'
Eigr f Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Igraine.
Eikinskjaldi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse eik "oak" and skjǫldr "shield". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Éile f Irish Mythology
Name of the sister of queen Méadbh(from irish mythology)
Eimyrja f Norse Mythology
Means "ember" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she is one of the two beautiful daughters of the fire god Logi and the mother of Viking by Vífil.
Eingana f Indigenous Australian Mythology
Eingana is the name of an Aboriginal snake goddess, the mother of all things but also a symbol of death. In the legend, she gave birth to all things, and sustains life through her umbilical cords, but whenever she cuts a cord, the thing bound to it dies.
Einmyria f Norse Mythology (Anglicized)
Form of Eimyrja. In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Logi and Glut... [more]
Eisa f Norse Mythology
Means "glowing embers" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Logi and Glut.
Eisirt m Irish Mythology
Servant of king Iubdan and one of the Otherworld's most significant bards.
Eistla f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from eist "oast", a kiln used for drying hops. This is the name of a Jǫtunn in Norse mythology.
Eitri m Norse Mythology
In Norse mythology, Eitri (also known as Sindri) is a dwarf and the brother of Brokkr.
Eitumatupua m Polynesian Mythology
The god Eitumatupua climbed down from the sky on a great tree, and took a worm descendant, Ilaheva, as his wife.
Ekaitza f Basque (Modern, Rare), Basque Mythology
Feminine form of Ekaitz, meaning "storm", that had long been forgotten and was eventually rediscovered at the beginning of the 20th century.... [more]
Ekanamsha f Hinduism
The name of a Hindu goddess, which may mean "the single, portionless one" or be derived from the Sanskrit एकांत (ekant) meaning "secluded, private, secret". This is also the name of the new moon.
Ekekheiria f Greek Mythology
Variant transcription of Ekecheiria.
Ekkeko m Incan Mythology
A Bolivian god of plenty and wealth. According to an ancient legend, when you place a miniature object on a doll representing the god, you will receive what you wish for the following year. It is considered bad luck to remove those objects from the doll.
Elan f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
One of the daughters of Dôn, a type of mother goddess and the Welsh equivalent of Irish Danu, in Welsh mythology. ... [more]
Elaphiaia f Greek Mythology
Alteration of Alpheiaia, influenced by Greek ἔλαφος (elaphos) "deer". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, under which she was worshipped in Elis.
Elara f Greek Mythology, Astronomy
Possibly derived from Greek ἄλαρα (alara) meaning "butt of spear-shaft", or the related word ἀλαρία (alaria) "tree which furnished shafts for spears". In Greek mythology Elara was one of Zeus's mortal lovers and by him the mother of the giant Tityos... [more]
Eldir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Norse mythology Eldir is one of Ægir's servants. After Loki is driven out of Ægir's hall for killing Fimafengr, he tries to regain entry, but Eldir refuses to let him in.
Ele f Basque (Modern), Basque Mythology
Ele is first and foremost the modern Basque feminine form of Elias.... [more]
Electryone f Greek Mythology
Meaning "rooster" or "amber". The Doric form of Electryone, Alectrona, is the feminine genitive of Αλεκτορ, Alektor, the Greek word for 'rooster', while Electryone itself is more similar to Ἠλέκτρα, Elektra, meaning 'amber'... [more]
Elegast m Germanic Mythology, Literature, Folklore
Albi "elf" + gastiz "spirit". Elegast is the hero and noble robber in the 'Karel ende Elegast', a Medieval Dutch epic poem.
Eleos f Greek Mythology
From Greek έλεος, meaning "mercy". In Greek mythology, Eleos was the personification of pity, mercy, clemency and compassion. Her opposite was Anaideia, the goddess of ruthlessness.
Elephenor m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἐλέφας (elephas) meaning "elephant" as well as "ivory" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". As such, the meaning of this name is either "elephant of a man" or "man made of ivory", both of which imply a man who is very strong, sturdy and possibly gigantic.... [more]
Elete f Greek Mythology
The name of one of the Horai, goddesses associated with the hours of a day and the months of a year. The name is of unknown etymology but could be related to the word αλετος (aletos) meaning "grinding" or alternatively λιτη (lite) meaning "prayer".
Eleuther m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
In Greek Mythology, Eleuther was the son of the god Apollo and Aithusa or Aethusa. It could also be an anglicized form of Eleutherius or Eleutherios.
Elichanaf m Judeo-Christian Legend
This is a name given to one of the sons of Magog in the Book of Jasher.
Elidyr m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of Elidir (see Elidur). This form appears in the legend of 'Culhwch and Olwen' belonging to one of Arthur's knights: Elidyr Gyvarwydd.
Elius f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
From Greek and Roman Mythology.... [more]
Elpenor m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἐλπίς (elpis) meaning "hope, expectation" (see Elpis) combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".... [more]
Elphin m Welsh Mythology
Possibly a Welsh cognate of the Gaelic name Ailpein (see Alpin). In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he was one of Arthur's warriors, the son of Gwyddno Long Shanks... [more]
Elta m Caucasian Mythology
This is the name of the god of animals and the hunt in Vainakh mythology. He was formerly the god of agriculture as well before Maetsill took his role and was blinded in one eye as a punishment for disobedience by his father Dela.
Em m Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Sanskrit
MEANING - way, course... [more]
Emathion m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Homeric Greek adjective ἠμαθόεις (emathoeis) meaning "sandy", which is ultimately derived from the Greek noun ἄμαθος (amathos) meaning "sand, dust, sandy soil"... [more]
Embeth f Germanic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
The name of one of the three Beten (or Bethen, Beden), a German group of three saints. They are adored in minor churches and chapels in South Tyrol (Italy), Upper Bavaria, Baden and the Rhineland... [more]
Emerentia f Late Roman, Dutch, German (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Judeo-Christian Legend
Feminine form of Emerentius. This name belonged to an early Christian martyr, and is also assigned to the mother of Saint Anna and grandmother of the Virgin Mary in some late 15th-century European traditions.
Emzara f Judeo-Christian Legend
The name of Noah's wife, a daughter of Rake'el (his father's brother), according to Jubilees 4:33 of the Old Testament Apocrypha.
Enak m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Marathi, Tamil, Kannada
Name -Enak एणक... [more]
Enarete f Greek Mythology
Daughter of Deimachus, was the wife of Aeolus and ancestress of the Aeolians.
Enceladus m Greek Mythology
A giant in Greek Mythology. Offspring of Gaia and Uranus. This is also the name of one of Saturn’s moons.
Endeïs f Greek Mythology
Dialectal form of Engaios (Ἐγγαῖος) meaning "in the Earth".
Endovelicus m Celtic Mythology
Celt-iberic god in ancient Portugal and spain, probabily an important deity due to its meaning, from celtic Ende, "more", and Vell, "better", "more" and "better" would thus have the same meaning as Optimus, that is, "Excellent"... [more]
Enedina f Basque, Medieval Basque, Basque Mythology, Spanish, Sardinian
Medieval Basque name, documented in Navarre. According to Basque folklore, she was the most beautiful girl in all of the Basque countries. The name has been speculated to be derived from Greek enedýno "to be courteous; obliging".
Enéh f Hungarian, Hungarian Mythology
Derived from Old Hungarian eneγ (ünő in Modern Hungarian) "hind, deer; fawn; cow-calf".... [more]
Enenra m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 煙 (en) meaning "smokey", 々, a ideographic iteration mark, indicating that the previous kanji should be repeated combined with 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric" or sometimes spelt as "enraenra" which is built from Japanese 煙 (en) meaning "smokey", 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric", 煙 (en) meaning "smokey" combined with 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric".... [more]
Eneth f Medieval Hungarian, Hungarian Mythology
Variant of Enet, mentioned in Simon of Kéza's 'Gesta Hunnorum et Hungarorum'.
Ennibrattr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Variant of Ænnibrantr. This is a by-name for Odin in Norse mythology.
Entella f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ενυό (enyo) "warlike" and τελος (telos) "purpose, aim".
Enyalius m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Means "warlike" in Greek. Enyalius was a minor god of war and the son of the war god and goddess Ares and Enyo.
Eolus m Greek Mythology
Hercules had a best friend of which went by the name of Eolus.
Eopsin f Korean Mythology
The name of the goddess of storage and wealth in traditional Korean religion, who traditionally takes the form of a snake or weasel and protects the home. Her name is derived from 業 (eop) meaning "profession, work, job" and 神 (sin) meaning "god, goddess, spirit"... [more]
Eosphoros m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἠώς (eos) "dawn" (see also Eos) combined with Greek φορεω (phoreo) "to carry, to bear." For the latter element, also compare Greek φερω (phero), which has the same meaning... [more]
Eostre f Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Eostre, or Ostara; Anglo-Saxon goddess of fertility. Foundation of the name Easter.
Ephesia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, Late Roman
Feminine form of Ephesius. In Greek mythology this was an epithet of the goddess Artemis meaning "of Ephesus", Ephesus being a city in Asia Minor famous for a temple dedicated to Artemis, which was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
Ephialtes m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "nightmare". This was the name of a giant in Greek mythology.
Ephyra f Greek Mythology
The name of a nymph of the town of Ephyraia (Corinth) on the Isthmos. The name is either taken from that place or means "fiery", from the element φυρα (phyra).
Epicaste f Greek Mythology
Unknown etymology.
Epicles m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Epikles. This name was borne by an eponymous archon of Athens from the 2nd century BC.
Epione f Greek Mythology
The name of the goddess of the soothing of pain. She was the wife of the medicine god Asklepios, and the mother of a number of minor healing god. The name is derived from Ηπιος (epios) meaning "soothing".
Epiphron m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective ἐπίφρων (epiphron) meaning "thoughtful". It consists of Greek ἐπί (epi) meaning "upon, on" combined with either the Greek noun φρόνις (phronis) meaning "prudence, wisdom" or the Greek verb φρονέω (phroneo) meaning "to think" as well as "to be minded"... [more]
Epipole f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Epipole was a daughter of Trachion, of Carystus in Euboea. In the disguise of a man she went with the Greeks against Troy... [more]
Epistrophos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἐπί (epi) meaning "upon, on" combined with Greek στρόφος (strophos) meaning "twisted band, twisted cord" as well as "rope". The latter element is etymologically related to the Greek verb στροφάω (strophao) meaning "to turn hither and thither" as well as "to rotate, to twist"... [more]
Epistrophus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Epistrophos. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology.
Eraoranhan m Guanche Mythology
From Guanche *era-uraɣan meaning "he who is in the fiery" (cf. Orahan). This was the name of a god worshipped by men on the island of Hierro (present-day Canary Islands, Spain), which was inhabited by a people known as the Bimbache.
Erasinos m Greek Mythology
The name of a River-God of Arkadia and Argos in the Peloponnesos, southern Greece. His name is taken from his river, the river Erasinus, of unknown etymology.
Erathipa f Indigenous Australian Mythology
A huge boulder in the shape of a pregnant woman bears this name (in Australia). It is said that the souls of dead children reside within it, and that if a woman of child-bearing age walks by a soul slips from the boulder and into her womb to be reborn.
Eremon m Irish Mythology
In Irish mythology Eremon (also known as Heremon) participated in the Milesian conquest of Ireland.
Ereuthalion m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective ἐρευθαλέος (ereuthaleos) meaning "reddish, ruddy", which is ultimately derived from the Greek noun ἔρευθος (ereuthos) meaning "redness, flush"... [more]
Erginus m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology this is the name of several men.
Erichthonius m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ἐριχθόνιος (Erichthonios), which is of uncertain etymology, possibly pre-Greek. Folk etymology connects it to Greek ἐρέχθω (erechthô) "to rend, break"... [more]
Eridanos m Greek Mythology
From the name of a River-God of the mythical northern land of Hyperborea. He was also the god of the constellation Eridanus. The river's name may mean "early burnt" from the elements eri and danos and refer to the myth of Phaethon.
Eridanus m Astronomy, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eridanos. This is the name of a constellation in the southern hemisphere named for a river god in Greek mythology.
Erigeneia f Greek Mythology
Epithet of the Greek goddess Eos meaning "early-born" or "child of dawn", derived from Greek ἦρι (eri) "early in the morning, at early morn" and γενης (genes) "born".
Erigone f Greek Mythology
The name of two characters in Greek mythology, one being the daughter of Icarius (a prominent Athenian), the other the daughter of Aegisthus and Clytemnestra.
Erinome f Greek Mythology
One of Jupiter's moons
Eriphyle f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "(of a) great nation" in Greek, from the intensive prefix ἐρι- (eri-) "very, much" combined with φυλή (phylê) "race, tribe". In Greek mythology this name was borne by the wife of Amphiaraos and daughter of Lysimache and Talaos, king of Argos.
Erka f Germanic Mythology, German (Modern, Rare)
A short form derived from Old High German erkan "pure, genuine".... [more]
Errafaila f Medieval Basque, Basque Mythology
Medieval Basque name of unknown origin and meaning.... [more]
Ersa f Greek Mythology
Doric Greek form of Herse, the Greek goddess of dew whose name ultimately derives from Ἑρση (herse) meaning "dew".
Erycina f Roman Mythology
Epithet of the Roman goddess Venus which meant "of Eryx", Eryx being a mountain on Sicily famous for a temple dedicated to Venus on its summit.
Erykine f Greek Mythology
Epithet of Aphrodite, which is derived from the name of the mountain Eryx in Sicily.
Erysichthon m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "earth tearer".
Erytheia f Greek Mythology
Derived from ἐρῠθρός (eruthrós) meaning "reddish, red".
Erytheis f Greek Mythology
Derived from ἐρῠθρός (eruthrós) meaning "reddish, red".
Eryx m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek verb ἐρύκω (eruko) or (eryko) meaning "to keep in, to curb, to hold back, to restrain". This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a king of the Elymian people from Sicily... [more]
Erzulie f Afro-American Mythology, New World Mythology
This is the Haitian Voodoo love goddess and goddess of elemental forces. She is personified as a water snake. She is also called Ezili.
Esfandiar m Persian, Persian Mythology, Literature
Modern Persian form of Sepandiar, which was the early New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Spandadat. The latter name ultimately comes from the Avestan name Spentodata, which means "given by (the) holy"... [more]
Esmerée f Welsh Mythology
Perhaps derived from Old French esmer "to like, love, respect". It was the name of a character in the Old French verse 'Le Bel Inconnu' (1185–90) by Renaut de Bâgé. In the Arthurian romance, Blonde Esmeree, Queen of Wales was turned into a serpent by the wizard Mabon and his brother Evrain, and saved by Gawain's son Guinglain, also known as the Fair Unknown.
Esuvia f Ancient Celtic, Celtic Mythology
Gaulish name, the feminine form of Esvios via its Latinized form Esuvius. It is presumably related to Esuvii, the name of a Gaulish tribe, and the Gaulish theonym Esus.
Etasha f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian (Christian), Assamese, Nepali, Gujarati, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali
MEANING - "shining, brilliant, of variegated colour". It is feminine of Etash... [more]
Eteocles m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eteokles. In Greek mythology, Eteocles was a king of Thebes, and the son of Oedipus.
Eteoclus m Greek Mythology
A son of Iphis, was, according to some traditions, one of the seven heroes who went with Adrastus against Thebes. He had to make the attack upon the Neitian gate, where he was opposed by Megareus. (Aeschyl... [more]
Eteokles m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "true glory", derived from Greek ἐτεός (eteos) "true, genuine, real" combined with Greek κλεος (kleos) "glory".
Ethniu f Irish Mythology
Older form of Eithne.
Ethodaia f Greek Mythology
Possibly related to ἦθος (êthos) meaning “character; custom, habit” in Ancient Greek.
Etsai m Basque Mythology
A spirit of knowledge in Basque mythology, his name means "devil" or "fiend". He teaches in a cave, and knows a great deal, but he is feared because, at the end of his lectures, he requires one of his students to remain at his service forever... [more]
Etügen Ekh f Mythology
Mongolian Earth mother goddess, often portrayed as a beautiful young woman riding a grey bull. The first part of her name may refer to Ötüken, the mythological holy mountain of the earth, and эх (ekh) means "mother, motherland".
Euá f New World Mythology
Euá is an Orixá (a goddess) of the Brazilian Candomblé. She is a water goddess who manifests as river, rain or mist.
Euaemon m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Εὐαίμων (Euaimon) which was possibly derived from εὔαιμος (euaimos) meaning "full-blooded", from εὖ (eu) "well" and αἷμα (haima) "blood"... [more]
Euagoras m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek verb εὐαγορέω (euagoreo) meaning "to praise formally", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek verb ἀγορεύω (agoreuo) meaning "to orate, to speak publicly".... [more]
Euanthes m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek εὐανθής (euanthês) meaning "blooming, flowery". It is the masculine equivalent of Euanthe. This name occurs in the 'Odyssey' belonging to the father of Maron, a priest of Apollo at Ismarus in Thrace.
Euboea f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Εὔβοια (Euboia), in which the first element is Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and the second element is possibly derived from the Greek verb βοάω (boao) meaning "to shout, to proclaim" (also "to roar" and "to howl" when used of the wind; compare Meliboea and Periboea)... [more]
Euboulos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὔβουλος (euboulos) meaning "well-advised, prudent", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek noun βουλή (boule) meaning "counsel, advice" as well as "will, determination".... [more]
Eubuleus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "good counsel".
Euchenor m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun εὐχή (euche) meaning "prayer, wish" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".... [more]
Eudaimon m Greek Mythology, Late Greek
Derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with Greek δαίμων (daimon) meaning "god, goddess, divine power, spirit". Also compare Greek εὐδαιμονία (eudaimonia) (derived from the same two roots), which is the name for the Greek concept of happiness... [more]
Eudaimonia f Greek Mythology
Means "happiness, good fortune" in Greek (compare Desdemona). In Greek mythology she was one of the younger Graces (Charites), the goddess of happiness, prosperity and opulence.
Euenor m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "good man", derived from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".
Euippe f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From the Greek elements ευ (eu) "good" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". It is the feminine equivalent of Euippos.
Euippos m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek εὔιππος (euippos) meaning "delighting in horses" and "well-horsed", derived from the Greek elements εὖ (eu) "good" and ἵππος (hippos) "horse"... [more]
Eukarpia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun εὐκαρπία (eukarpia) meaning "fruitfulness", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" and the Greek noun καρπός (karpos) meaning "fruit".... [more]
Eukelade f Greek Mythology, Astronomy
The name of one of Jupiter's moons. It was named in 2005, allegedly after a mythological character described by some Greek writers as one of the Muses.
Eukleia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun εὔκλεια (eukleia) meaning "good repute, glory", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek noun κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory"... [more]
Eumaeus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eumaios. In Greek mythology, this is the name of the swineherd of Odysseus.
Eumaios m Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well". The second element is uncertain; it might possibly be derived from the Greek verb μαίομαι (maiomai) meaning "to seek after, to seek for" or from the (hitherto unknown) masculine equivalent of the Greek noun μαῖα (maia) meaning "good mother, foster mother" (see Maia 1).
Eumolpos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὔμολπος (eumolpos) meaning "sweetly singing", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" and the Greek noun μολπή (molpe) meaning "song, dance".
Eumolpus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eumolpos. In Greek mythology, this was the name of a legendary Thracian king.
Eunoe f Greek Mythology
From Greek εὔνους (eunous) meaning "well-minded, friendly", which is composed of ευ (eu) "good, well" and νοῦς (nous) "mind" (see also Eunous, Eunoia)... [more]
Eunomos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὔνομος (eunomos) meaning "under good laws, well-ordered". It consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek noun νόμος (nomos) meaning "usage, custom, law, ordinance" (see Eunomia).
Eunomus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Eunomos. Notable bearers of this name include a Spartan king (8th century BC) and an Athenian admiral who participated in the Corinthian War (4th century BC).
Eupeithes m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐπειθής (eupeithes) meaning "ready to obey, obedient", which consists of Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good, well" combined with the Greek verb πείθω (peitho) meaning "to persuade, to convince" as well as "to obey, to yield to" and "to believe, to trust (in)".... [more]
Euphemus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "reputable".
Euphorion m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek εὐφορέω (euphoreô) meaning "to bear well, be productive".
Euporie f Greek Mythology (?), Astronomy
A form of Euporia. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in honour of Euporia or Euporie, the Greek goddess of abundance and one of the third generation of Horai.
Eurgain f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh aur "gold" (penult form eur) and cain "fair; fine; elegant". In Welsh mythology, Eurgain is noted as the first female saint and daughter of Caratacus (see Caradog) in the History of Dunraven Manuscript, a manuscript giving the genealogy of Taliesin.
Eurus m & f Greek Mythology
Eurus was the god of the east wind, one of the four directional Anemoi (Wind-Gods). He was associated with the season of autumn and dwelt near the palace of the sun-god Helios in the far east.
Euryale f Greek Mythology
Means "far-roaming" from Greek εὐρύς (eurys) "wide, broad" and ἄλη (ale) "wandering, roaming" (from the verb ἀλάομαι (alaomai) "to wander")... [more]
Euryanassa f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Euryanax. This is the name of two characters from Greek mythology.
Eurybates m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "wide-ranging" or "wide-roaming".
Eurybia f Greek Mythology
Means "wide force" from the Greek elements ευρυ (eury) meaning "wide" and βία (bia) "force", with all its connotations. This is the name of the ancient Greek goddess of the mastery of the sea... [more]
Eurybius m Greek Mythology
Derived from εὐρῠ́ς (eurús) meaning “broad” and βῐ́ος (bíos) meaning "life".
Euryclea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurykleia. In Greek mythology, Euryclea was the wet nurse of Odysseus' son Telemachus. She was the first to recognize Odysseus when he returned to Ithaca after the Trojan War.
Eurycleia f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant latinization of Eurykleia, because its proper (and most common) latinized form is Euryclea.... [more]
Eurycyda f Greek Mythology
Derived from εὐρῠ́ς (eurús) meaning “broad” and κῦδος (kûdos) meaning "glory".
Eurydome f Greek Mythology
One of Jupiter's moons.
Euryganeia f Greek Mythology
Derived from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and an unknown second element.
Eurykleia f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Eurykles. In Greek mythology, Eurykleia was the wet nurse of Odysseus' son Telemachus. She was the first to recognize Odysseus when he returned to Ithaca after the Trojan War.
Euryleon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun λέων (leon) meaning "lion". This name was borne by a Spartan tyrant of Selinus, who lived in the 6th century BC.... [more]
Eurylochos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun λόχος (lochos) meaning "ambush", a word that later came to signify a tactical sub unit of the ancient Greek army... [more]
Eurylochus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurylochos. This name was borne by a Thessalian general from the 6th century BC and by a Spartan general from the 5th century BC.... [more]
Eurymachos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun μάχη (mache) meaning "battle".
Eurymachus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurymachos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of an Ithacan nobleman, who is one of the suitors of Penelope.
Eurymede f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Eurymedes. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the daughters of king Oeneus of Calydon.
Eurymedon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun μέδων (medon) meaning "ruler" (see Medon).... [more]
Eurymenes m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρυμενής (eurymenes) meaning "broad and strong", which consists of the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun μένος (menos) meaning "mind" as well as "spirit" and "power, strength, force".... [more]
Eurynome f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Eurynomos. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, including a sea deity and a queen.
Eurynomos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with either the Greek noun νομός (nomos) meaning "pasture, field" or the Greek noun νόμος (nomos) meaning "usage, custom, law, ordinance" (see Eunomia).... [more]
Eurynomus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurynomos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the suitors of Penelope.
Euryphaessa f Greek Mythology
Means "far-shining", derived from Greek εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and φάος (phaos) "light". This was an epithet of the Titan goddess Theia, occurring in one of the Homeric Hymns (namely Hymn 31, "To Helios", where Helios' mother Theia is called "mild-eyed Euryphaessa, the far-shining one").
Eurypon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
This name was most notably borne by a king of Sparta, after whom the Eurypontid dynasty was named. It is not quite clear whether he is a historical person, or whether he is fully mythological. If the former applies, then he is thought to have lived in the 9th century BC.... [more]
Eurypyle f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun πύλη (pyle) meaning "gate, entrance".... [more]
Eurypylos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun πύλη (pyle) meaning "gate, entrance".
Eurypylus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurypylos. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of which is a Thessalian king.
Eurysthenes m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, History
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun σθένος (sthenos) meaning "vigour, strength". This name was borne by a Spartan king from the 10th century BC.... [more]
Eurystheus m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ευρυς (eurys) meaning "wide" combined with Greek σθενος (sthenos) meaning "strength". In Greek mythology, Eurystheus was a cousin of Heracles, king of the Mycenae and Tiryns in Argos... [more]
Eurystratos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun στρατός (stratos) meaning "army".
Eurystratus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eurystratos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the suitors of Penelope.
Euryte f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek εὐρύτης (eurytês) meaning "width, breadth". This was the name of multiple minor characters in Greek mythology.
Eurythemis f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide, broad" combined with the Greek noun θέμις (themis) meaning "law of nature, divinely ordained justice, that which is laid down" (see Themis).... [more]
Eurytion m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek εὐρὺς (eurys) meaning "wide". This name was borne by at least four characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a son of Ares and two others being centaurs.
Eurytus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Εὔρυτος (Eurytos) which may have been derived from εὖ (eu) "well" and ἐρύω (eruô) or (eryô) "to draw, drag, pull", perhaps with the implied meaning "drawer of the bow"... [more]
Eusorus m Greek Mythology
Derived from εὐ- (eu-) meaning “good” and σωρός (sōrós) meaning "heap, pile".
Euthenia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek εὐθηνία (euthenia) meaning "prosperity, plenty, abundance". In Greek mythology Euthenia was the personification of abundance and plenty.
Euthymos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective εὔθυμος (euthymos) meaning "kind, generous" as well as "cheerful" (see Euthymius).... [more]
Evaechme f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Εὐαίχμη (Euaichme), which was composed of Greek εὐ- (eu-) meaning "good" and αἰχμή (aichme) "point of a spear, battle". In Greek mythology this name was borne by a daughter of Herakles' son Hyllos.
Evagoras m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Latinized form of Euagoras as well as the modern Greek form of the name.... [more]
Evanthe f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Theatre
Latinized form of Euanthe. Characters named Evanthe appear in John Fletcher's 17th-century tragicomedy A Wife for a Month and Thomas Godfrey's 18th-century romantic tragedy The Prince of Parthia (which was the first play written by an American to be presented in the United States by a professional cast of actors).
Evenor m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Euenor. This name was borne by a Greek painter from the 5th century BC.... [more]
Evenus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the name of a river that flowed through Aetolia in central Greece, which is of unknown meaning. According to Greek legend, Evenus was the name of a prince who drowned himself in the river and was then transformed into the god of the river.... [more]
Evippe f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Euippe. In Greek legend this was the name of a princess of Dodona in Epirus; she bore Odysseus a son, Euryalus, who was later mistakenly slain by his father.
Fabulinus m Roman Mythology
The god who invoked the first instance of articulate speech, whose name derives form fari, "to speak"; cf. fabula.
Fælværa m Ossetian Mythology
Possibly a combination of the names of the saints Florus and Laurus. Fælværa was the one-eyed protector of sheep. There is a festival of sheep-shearing honored after him in September... [more]
Fáfnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Means "the embracer" in Old Norse. It is a name of a dragon in Nordic poetry.
Fainche f Irish (Rare), Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish fuinche meaning "scald-crow" or "black fox". It occurs in Irish myth as the name of the daughter of Dáire Derg and mother of the three Fothads by a warrior called Mac Nia... [more]
Falaka f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Malayalam, Kannada
Name - Falaka ( फलका)... [more]
Falibhu m Hinduism
MEANING : : to obtain fruit or reward. Here फली means reward, fruit + भू means obtaining... [more]
Falin m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Nepali, Tamil
"Bearing fruits" ;"fruitful"... [more]
Falit m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism, Punjabi, Hindi, Bengali, Nepali, Gujarati
MEANING : bearing or yielding fruits, successful, having an iron point (as an arrow ), a tree, producing consequences, developed... [more]
Falr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from either falr ("pipe, tube") or fela ("to hide"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Fama f Roman Mythology
The Roman equivalent of Pheme. Her name is derived from Latin fama "fame; report; rumor" (ultimately from Latin fari "to speak".
Faramarz m Persian Mythology, Persian
Means "one who forgives" from Persian آمرزیدن (âmorzidan) meaning "to forgive". This is the name of a hero in the Persian epic Shahnameh.
Farangis f Persian, Persian Mythology
This is the name of a female character in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'. Farangis is the wife of Siavash and mother of Kay Khosrow.
Fárbauti m Norse Mythology
Old Norse for "cruel or dangerous striker" or "lightening". In Norse mythology, Fárbauti was the ruler of the Jötunn (Norse: ice giants) and their domain, Jötunheimr. He was the consort of Laufey or Nal and father of the Norse god of primordial chaos and destruction, Loki... [more]
Farinus m Roman Mythology
The god who invoked speech in children.
Fasolt m Germanic Mythology, Theatre
In Richard Wagner's opera cycle "The Ring", Fasolt is the brother of Fáfnir (here called Fafner) and is killed by him in an argument.
Favonius m Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Roman family name of disputed origin. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it is from Latin favere "to favor"; Ernest Klein says, by dissimilation from *fovonius, literally "the warming wind", from fovere "to warm"... [more]
Feilian m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
The name of a creature or deity in Chinese mythology who is consistently associated with the wind. According to one source it has the body of a bird and the head of a deer. Another source says it has the body and horns of a deer, the head of a sparrow, the spots of a leopard and the tail of a snake... [more]
Fenashani m Hinduism
MEANING : "having foam for a thunderbolt ", lord Indra... [more]
Fenghou m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 风 (fēng, meaning “wind”) and 后 (hòu, meaning “after”). Fenghou was the prime minister during the reign of the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan)... [more]
Fengr m Norse Mythology
Derived from ("catch"). This is a name for Odin in Norse mythology.
Fenja f Norse Mythology, Literature
Derived from Old Norse fen meaning "moor, marsh, swamp". Also compare Fenrir, which is etymologically related.... [more]
Fenris m Norse Mythology, Literature
Short form of the Old Norse Fenrisúlfr (literally "Fenrir-wolf"). The form Fenris Ulf was used for a talking wolf (originally named Maugrim) in the now defunct American edition of C. S. Lewis' 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'.
Fenrisúlfr m Norse Mythology
Derived from Fenris, an Old Norse genitive case of Fenrir, combined with úlfr "wolf". The Prose Edda sometimes refers to the monstrous wolf Fenrir as Fenrisúlfr.
Ferdia m Irish Mythology
From Fer Diad, which is of uncertain meaning. The first element is Gaelic fear "man"; the second element could be related to dïas "two persons" ("man of the pair") or an element meaning "smoke" ("man of smoke")... [more]
Ferdiad m Irish Mythology
Irish name likely meaning "warrior of the pair". In Irish mythology, Ferdiad was the best friend and foster brother of Cú Chulainn, whom he is eventually forced to fight and subsequently killed by.
Feronia f Etruscan Mythology
Derived from a Sabine adjective corresponding to Latin fĕrus "not cultivated, untamed; of the field, wood; not mitigated by any cultivation". Feronia was a goddess associated with wildlife, fertility, health, and abundance... [more]
Fertram m Icelandic (Modern, Rare), Folklore
Icelandic name of unknown origin and meaning, invented for a fairy tale Sagan af Fertram og Ísól björtu, which translates as The story of Fertram and bright Ísól in English. The name is probably influenced by the names Bertram and Ferdinand.
Féthnaid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Of uncertain origin and meaning.... [more]
Fflamddwyn m Welsh Mythology
Welsh byname meaning "flame-bearer". This appears in medieval poems attributed to Taliesin.
Fial f Irish Mythology
Means "generous, modest, honorable" in Irish. In Irish myth this was the name of Emer's elder sister, "also a goddess", whom Cúchulainn supposedly rejected because of her relations with Cairbre Nia Fer... [more]
Fíli m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly related to Low German vîle ("file, rasp"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Fili m Literature, Germanic Mythology
Name of one of the dwarves in The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. Brother of Kili... [more]
Fimafengr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Norse mythology Fimafengr is one of Ægir's servants. Loki kills him and is driven out as a result.
Fimmilena f Germanic Mythology
Fimmilena was a goddes known from inscriptions in Northern England. Her functions are unclear; there have, however, been efforts to link her name to the Fimelthing, a kind of court held in early medieval times.
Findabhair f Irish, Irish Mythology
Popularly claimed to be an Irish cognate of Gwenhwyfar (see Guinevere), it may actually mean "fair-browed" from Old Irish find "white, fair" and abair "a brow" (or "eyelash")... [more]
Finegas m Irish Mythology
Finn Eces (Also known as Finneces, Finegas, or Finnegas) is a legendary Irish poet and sage, according to the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology.
Finlugh m Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Gaelic fionn "white, fair" and lug "light, brightness". The second element may refer to the pagan sun god Lugh, in which case it means "fair Lugh"... [more]
Finneces m Irish Mythology
A legendary Irish poet and sage, according to the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology.
Fionnula f Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of Fionnghuala (see Fionnuala). A known bearer of this name is the Irish actress Fionnula Flanagan (b. 1941).
Fitela m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Old English equivalent of Sinfjötli. It occurs in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'.
Fjalarr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic (Rare)
Meaning unknown. Possibly related to Old Norse fela "to hide", Norwegian fjela "to spy" or Old Norse fjǫl "much, manifold".... [more]
Fjǫlnir m Norse Mythology
Derived from fjǫl ("much, manifold"), fela ("hide") or felþa ("field"). In Norse mythology this is both a name for Odin and the name of a legendary Swedish king.
Fjǫlsviðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from fjǫl ("much, manifold") and svinnr ("fast, clever"). In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf, a by-name for Odin, and the giant who guarded Menglǫð.
Fjǫlverkr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of fjǫl ("much") and verk ("work"). This is the name of a giant in Norse mythology.
Fjǫlvǫr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from fjǫl ("much") and vár ("spring; woman; truth"). This is the name of a giantess in Norse mythology.
Flidais f Irish Mythology
Meaning uncertain, allegedly "doe". Flidais was an Irish goddess of forests, hunting and wild animals, especially stags and deer - by which her chariot was drawn. She is the chief figure in the 'Táin Bó Flidhais', one of the lesser known cattle raid tales which makes her the wife of Ailill Finn and lover, later wife, of the hero Fergus mac Róich.
Fluonia f Roman Mythology
Derives from fluo, fluere, "to flow," is a form of Juno who retains the nourishing blood within the womb. Women attended to the cult of Juno Fluonia "because she held back the flow of blood (i.e., menstruation) in the act of conception" and pregnancy... [more]
Fódla f Irish Mythology
One of a trinity of Irish goddesses, with Banba and Ériu.
Fönn f Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Means "snowdrift" in Old Norse. It occurs in Norse legend belonging to a daughter of king Snær ("snow"), sister of Drífa ("driven snow" or "snowfall"), Mjöll ("powdery (fresh) snow") and Þorri ("frozen snow").
Forgall m Irish Mythology
Perhaps related to Irish forgella "testifies". In Irish legend he was the father of Emer, nicknamed "the cunning, dextrous, wily". The Wily Lord of Lusca tried to prevent his daughter marrying Cúchulainn and, rather than face the champion's wrath, leapt to his death from the ramparts of his fortress.
Forseti m Norse Mythology
Forseti means "presiding one; president" in Old Norse (and in modern Icelandic and Faeroese as well).... [more]
Fosite m Germanic Mythology
Frisian god who was worshipped on Helgoland. ... [more]
Frægr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "famous". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Fraoch m Irish Mythology
Means "wrath" or "fury" in Irish. Fraoch is a Connacht hero in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, the hero of the 'Táin Bó Fraoch', Cattle Raid of Fraoch (which has been claimed to be the main source of the English saga of 'Beowulf')... [more]
Frár m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "swift, quick, alert". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Freawaru f Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Derived from frēa, a poetic word meaning "lord, king" and waru meaning "care, watch, guard, protection".
Freki m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse frekr "avaricious, greedy." In Norse mythology, Freki is the name of one of Odin's two wolves. Freki resembles Gluttony and he is always very hungry, just like Geri (the other wolf)... [more]
Frigga f Norse Mythology
Anglicized form of Frigg. It has occasionally been used as a Swedish given name (first documented in 1834), sometimes as a diminutive of Fredrika (compare Fricke).
Frija f Germanic Mythology
Southern Germanic form of Frigg via Frigga.
Frosti m Ancient Scandinavian, Old Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Originally a byname, from Old Norse frost "frost". In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf.
Fudo m Japanese (Rare), Japanese Mythology
This is the god of fire and wisdom in Japanese mythology, and it has also become a rare name for males.
Fufei f Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 宓 (fu, a surname) and 妃 (fei, meaning “concubine, consort”). More commonly known as Luoshen (洛神), Fufei is the goddess of the Luo River in Chinese mythology, first appearing in the Chuci (楚辞) or Elegies of Chu as the wife of the river god Hebo... [more]
Fufluns m Etruscan Mythology
Etruscan deity, predominantly of wine, health, happiness, and growth. He is often considered the Etruscan equivalent of the Greek god Dionysus and the Roman god Bacchus.
Fulgora f Roman Mythology
From Latin fulgur meaning "lightning", which is derived from fulgeo "to flash, lighten, shine". In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess who presided over lightning, equivalent to the Greek goddess Astrape.
Fulla f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Swedish, Danish
Derived from either fullr ("full") or fyl ("foal"). This is the name of a goddess in Norse mythology who acts as Frigg's handmaiden. Her name is used as a kenning for "gold" or "woman".
Fullan f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism
MEANING : puffing up, inflating... [more]
Fullvati f Hinduism
MEANING : blossoming, expanded... [more]
Furrina f Roman Mythology
Furrina was an ancient Roman goddess whose function had become obscure by the 1st century BC. Her cult dated to the earliest period of Roman religious history, since she was one of the fifteen deities who had their own flamen, the Furrinalis, one of the flamines minores... [more]
Fuxi m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 伏 (fu, meaning “to lie prostrate”) and 羲 (xi, referring to the god himself). Fuxi is the twin brother and husband of Nüwa, one of the ancestors of humankind... [more]
Fylgia f Norse Mythology, Swedish (Rare)
From Old Norse fylgja "to accompany, to follow" (compare modern Swedish följa and modern Danish and Norwegian følge). In Norse mythology a fylgia is a type of spirit who accompanies a person through their life from the day they were born... [more]
Gæirreðr m Norse Mythology
Derived from geir ("spear") and friðr ("love, peace"). In the Grímnismál, Gæirreðr is raised by Odin while his brother Agnarr is raised by Frigg... [more]
Gaheris m Arthurian Romance, Welsh Mythology
This is the name of a character in Arthurian tales, a brother of Gawain (as well as Gareth, Mordred and Agravain), and the son of King Lot and either Belisent or Morgause... [more]
Gairi f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Marathi, Tamil, Indian, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Sinhalese, Assamese, Nepali
MEANING - flame lily (gloriosa superba- bot.) , relating to or growing in mountains, mountain-born ... [more]
Galarr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "screamer" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this is the name of both a giant and a dwarf. The dwarf and his brother, Fjalarr, murdered Kvasir and brewed the mead of the skalds from his blood... [more]
Galatea f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Directly taken from Greek Γαλάτεια meaning "she who is milk-white". It is also often interpreted as meaning "calm goddess" from Greek galene meaning "calm" and theia meaning "goddess"... [more]
Gal Eezh f Mythology
Mongolian form of Od Ana.
Gal-erda m Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Gal-Erda was the Vainakh god of cattle.
Ganapatihridaya f Mythology
A Buddhist epithet of Vinayaki meaning "heart of Ganesha".
Ganesa m Hinduism (Rare)
Variant transcription of Ganesha.
Gangleri m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "the one tired from walking". In Norse mythology this is a by-name for Odin and an alias of the Swedish king Gylfi.
Gangráðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "he who knows the way" or might be derived from gangr ("walking, motion, path") and ráð ("advice, counsel"). Odin uses this as an alias during his battle of wits with Vafþrúðnir.
Garamantis f Greek Mythology
Is a nymph in Greek mythology. She was abducted by Zeus, raped and imprisoned. She bore the later king and rival of Aeneas, Jarbas.
Garang m Dinka, African Mythology
According to the Dinka myths Garang is the First Man, created by Nhialic.
Garm m Norse Mythology
Means "rag" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this is the name of a blood-stained hellhound (occasionally considered identical to Fenrir) who guards Hel's gate... [more]