Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Garshasp m Near Eastern Mythology
A monster-slaying hero in Iranian mythology.
Garsivaz m Persian Mythology
Derived from the Avestan name Keresavazdah, of which the first element is derived from Avestan kərəsa meaning "having meager". The second element is derived from Avestan vazdah meaning "fat, fatness, fattiness, solidity", which itself is derived from Iranian *vazd-ah- meaning "animal fat, grease" - ultimately from the Iranian base vazd- meaning "to nourish" or "nourishment"... [more]
Garuda m Hinduism
Means "eagle, devourer" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a divine bird-like creature in Hindu belief. He is considered the mount of Vishnu.
Gatag m Ossetian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Gatag is a water spirit in Ossetian mythology and the father of Syrdon in the Nart epics. Since he was the ruler of water, he could cut off the Narts' water supply at any time he desired, but he chose to befriend them instead... [more]
Gautr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
From Old Norse gautr meaning "Goth, Geat". The Geats were a Germanic tribe that inhabited the present-day Götaland in Sweden. This is a by-name for Odin in Norse mythology.
Geb m Egyptian Mythology
In Egyptian mythology he was the god of the Earth and a member of the Ennead of Heliopolis. He was said to be the father of earthquakes and that it was he who allowed crops to grow. Due to a mistake in translation and a change in how his name was written over the years in Ancient Egypt, his name was sometimes erroneously read as Seb or Keb, though the original Egyptian name for him may have been more similar to Gebeb/Kebeb... [more]
Gefion f Norse Mythology, Danish (Rare, Archaic), German (Rare)
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Old Norse verb geba "to give", the suffix of the name may stem from the Norse hjón "the joined", meaning a household, a loving couple, or even the crew on a ship, particularly a skeið... [more]
Gefjon f German (Rare), Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Gefion. Gefjon is a fertility goddess, the wife of Odin's son Skjǫldr... [more]
Gefn f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "giver". In Norse mythology this is one of the names of the goddess Freyja. It is possible that Gefn was originally a goddess in her own right.
Gehidusiusos m & f African Mythology
Gehidusiusos helped africans in south africa to find water and to build houses and make fire.
Geirahǫð f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from geirr ("spear") and hǫð ("battle"). This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Geiravǫr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Gæirvǫr. This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Geirdriful f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "spear-flinger". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Geirǫlul f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. Possibly a variant of Geirǫnul or a combination of geirr ("spear") and ǫl ("ale"). This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Geirǫnul f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown; possibly a combination of geirr ("spear") and ana- (emphatic prefix). This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Geirskǫgul f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of geirr 'spear' and skǫgul 'battle'. This is also the name of a Valkyrie.
Gelanor m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek verb γελάω (gelao) meaning "to laugh" combined with the Greek noun ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man".... [more]
Gelfrat m Germanic Mythology, Medieval German
Formed from the High German name elements GELF "boast, yelp" and RAT "council, advice".... [more]
Gerana f Greek Mythology
Derived from γέρανος (geranos) meaning "crane".
Geras m Greek Mythology
Means "old age." Geras was the spirit (daimon) of old age, one of the malevolent spirits spawned by the goddess Nyx (Night).
Geri m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gjarn "greedy", which is related to Gothic gairns (see Adalgern). In Norse mythology, Geri is the name of one of Odin's two wolves... [more]
Gerovit m Germanic Mythology, Slavic Mythology
Most likely a German corruption of Slavic Jarovit.... [more]
Gersemi f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gersemi "treasure, something which is considered precious or valuable". In Norse mythology this is one of Freyja and Óðr's daughters.
Geryon m Greek Mythology
In Ancient Greek Mythology he is son of Chrysaor and Callirrhoe and grandson of Medusa. Geryon was a fearsome giant who dwelt on the island Erytheia of the mythic Hesperides in the far west of the Mediterranean... [more]
Gesander m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Γέσανδρος (Gesandros). This given name could possibly be derived from Greek γῆ (ge) "the earth, soil, land" combined with Greek ανδρος (andros) "of a man", but most likely it is actually of Scythian origin... [more]
Geštinanna f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of an early goddess of Southern Mesopotamia associated with writing and the netherworld. Her name means "Wine (or vine) of the heavens (or the god An)".
Ghatotkacha m Indian, Hinduism
From घटोत्कच (Ghaṭotkaca), meaning "bald pot" in Sanskrit. He is a great warrior and the son of Bhima and Hidimbi in the Mahabharata.
Ghmerti m Georgian Mythology
Derived from Georgian ღმერთი (ghmert'i), from Old Georgian ღმერთი ‎(ɣmerti), and ultimately from Proto-Kartvelian *ɣamort- meaning "God". Ghmerti is the supreme god in Georgian mythology and head of all the other deities... [more]
Gillingr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from gjalla ("to scream") and -ingr (suffix meaning "son of" or "belonging to"). This is the name of a giant in Norse mythology.
Giltinė f Baltic Mythology
The Lithuanian goddess of death, first mentioned by Matthäus Prätorius.... [more]
Gimlé m Norse Mythology
Possibly means "place protected by fire". In Norse mythology this is a hall covered with gold where mankind will live after Ragnarǫk.
Gimli m Norse Mythology, Literature
In Norse Mythology, was a place where the survivors of Ragnarok were to live, meaning "highest heaven" or "lee of flames". ... [more]
Ginnar m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Ginnarr. In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf and another name for Odin.
Gísli m Icelandic, Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element gísl "hostage; pledge" or geisli "ray; pole (part of a weapon)".
Giv m Persian, Persian Mythology
A character in the Shahnameh
Gjallabrú m Norse Mythology
Means "bridge over Gjöll" (the river closest to the gates of Helheim). This is the name of a bridge in Norse mythology, guarded by Móðguðr, which must be crossed to reach the land of the dead... [more]
Glauce f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Glauke. Glauce is the name of several figures in Greek mythology.
Glauke f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek γλαυκός (glaukos), which can mean "blue-grey, bluish grey" as well as "gleaming, bright". Also compare the given name Glaukos (see Glaucus).
Glói m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse male form of Glóa or an Icelandic form of Glóði. In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf.
Glóin m Literature, Germanic Mythology
From Old Norse, meaning "glowing".... [more]
Glóinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Glói. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Glúm f Norse Mythology
A minor Norse goddess, an attendant of Frigg.
Glut f Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse Glöð meaning "glowing, bright, sparkling". In Norse myth she was a fire giantess, the wife of Logi.
Glykon m Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective γλυκύς (glykys) meaning "sweet (to the taste)".... [more]
Glyrna f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "eye". This is the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology.
Gná f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
In Norse mythology, Gná is a goddess who runs errands in other worlds for the goddess Frigg and rides the flying, sea-treading horse Hófvarpnir ("hoof-thrower")... [more]
Gogmagog m Cornish, Welsh Mythology
In medieval English legend, he is a giant chieftain of Cornwall who was slain by Brutus’s companion Corineus... [more]
Goldilocks f Folklore, Literature
From a nickname for a young girl with blond hair that originated from the English words gold and locks. This is best known as the name of the main character in the fairy tale 'Goldilocks and the Three Bears.' The name was also used by J. R. R. Tolkien in 'The Lord of the Rings,' where it belongs to one of Samwise Gamgee's daughters.
Gǫll f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "noise, battle". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Gǫndul f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Meaning unknown. Possibly derived from gandr "magic, magic wand" or gǫndul "magical animal; werewolf". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Gonggong m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 共 (gòng, meaning “together”) and 工 (gōng, meaning “work”). Gonggong is a water god in Chinese mythology whose violent, subversive nature caused great disasters and floods... [more]
Gorgophone f Greek Mythology
Means "grim murder", derived from Greek γοργός (gorgos) "grim, fierce, terrible" (also compare Gorgo) combined with Greek φονη (phone) "murder, slaughter, carnage"... [more]
Gorgos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from either the Greek adjective γοργός (gorgos) meaning "grim, fierce, terrible" or the Greek verb γοργεύω (gorgeuo) meaning "to move rapidly, to hasten". Also compare the Greek verb γοργόομαι (gorgoomai) meaning "to be spirited".
Gorgus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Gorgos. In Greek mythology, this was the name of an uncle of king Periander of Corinth.
Gorgythion m Greek Mythology
The meaning of this name is surrounded by uncertainty. The one thing that can be stated for certain about this name, is that it contains the Greek diminutive suffix -ιων (-ion). For the rest of the name, there are several possibilities available... [more]
Górr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly means "three-sided field". In Norse mythology Górr (also spelt Gór) is the son of Þorri and brother of Nórr and Gói... [more]
Gothia f Baltic Mythology
Lithuanian goddess of cattle, recorded by 17th-century historian and ethnographer Matthäus Prätorius in his work Deliciae Prussica (published in 1703).... [more]
Goumang m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 句 (gou, meaning “hooked”) and 芒 (mang, meaning “awn”). Goumang is the Chinese god of wood who oversees the spring and the east, especially the rising place of the sun... [more]
Gradivus m Roman Mythology
An epithet of the Roman god Mars meaning "he who marches (into battle)" from Latin gradus "step, pace, gait, stride, walk". 'Mars Gradivus had a temple outside the Porta Capena on the Appian road, and it is said that king Numa appointed twelve Salii as priests of this god.'
Gralon m Medieval Breton, Breton Legend
Younger form of Gratlon. In Breton legend, Gralon was the king of Kêr-Is and the father of Ahez.
Greip f & m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Norwegian
Old Norse female form of Græipi or Norwegian variant of Greipr. In Norse mythology this is the name of a sorceress.
Gremory m Judeo-Christian Legend
Origins unknown. This is the name of a demon identified in 'The Lesser Key of Solomon' who appears in the form of a beautiful woman.
Grendel m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
The name of monster from Old English heroic epic poem "Beowulf".
Grian f Irish Mythology
Grian (literally, "Sun") is the name of an Irish figure, presumed to be a pre-Christian goddess, associated with County Limerick and Cnoc Greine ("Hill of Grian, Hill of the sun").
Grímnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Variant of Grímr. This is a by-name for Odin in Norse mythology.
Grímr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "masked person" or "shape-changer" in Old Norse (derived from gríma "mask, helmet"). This was a byname of the god Odin, perhaps given to boys in an attempt to secure the protection of the god.
Grýla f Norse Mythology
Grýla is a mythic giantess who comes down from the mountains at Christmas to eat all the bad children.
Guabancex f New World Mythology
Possibly means "rider of the hurricane" in Taíno. This was the name of a Taíno wind and water goddess who personified the hurricane. She was the strongest deity in the Taíno pantheon and the only female zemí.
Guanhumara f Welsh Mythology
Latin form of Guinevere found in some manuscripts of Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia Regum Britanniae'.
Guanyin f Chinese Mythology
Means "one who observes sounds" from Chinese 观 (guān) meaning "to observe, to view" and 音 (yīn) meaning "sound, tone", referring to the prayers and cries of those who need help... [more]
Guasche f Caucasian Mythology, Circassian
Derived from Circassian гуащэ (g°āš̍ă) meaning "lady, princess". In Circassian mythology, Guasche (or Gwasche) is a protectress and patroness goddess.
Guayota m Guanche Mythology
Guayota or Guaiota was the name given by the Guanches, ancient aborigines of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) to the main evil entity of their mythology according to the first historians of the Canary Islands.... [more]
Guénolé m Breton (Gallicized), Breton Legend
Gallicized form of Gwenole, itself derived from Old Breton uuin meaning "white", and by extension "fair; blessed", and uual "brave". This was the name of a legendary Breton saint who was inspired to found an abbey by a dream he had of Saint Patrick.
Gullveig f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a variant of Guðveig and a combination of gull "gold" with an obscure name element veig... [more]
Gǔn m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
In Chinese mythology, this is the father of Yu the Great (Wenming). He was the first person who tried to quell the Great Flood, but he failed and was either exiled or executed at Yushan (Feather Mountain)... [more]
Guðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Gunnr. This is the name of a Valkyrie.
Gwenddydd f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "holy day" or "white day" in Welsh. In early Welsh tradition this is the name of Myrddin's sister. Geoffrey of Monmouth calls her Ganieda.
Gwenhwyfach f Welsh Mythology
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from the name Gwenhwyfar combined with Welsh ach, a suffix which "evokes unpleasantness" (according to Patrick Sims-Williams)... [more]
Gwenwledyr f Welsh Mythology
The first element is Welsh gwen "fair, white, blessed"; the second element, gwledyr, is uncertain. In the tale of Culhwch and Olwen (which appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth), Gwenwledyr was a lady who lived at Arthur's court, the daughter of Gwawrddur the Hunchback and sister of three of Arthur's warriors: Duach, Brathach and Nerthach.
Gwern m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwern "alder tree". Gwern is a minor figure in Welsh tradition. He is the son of Matholwch, king of Ireland, and Branwen, sister to the king of Britain... [more]
Gwion m Welsh Mythology, Welsh
Possibly related to the Welsh element gwyn meaning "fair, blessed". This was the original name of Taliesin, a legendary bard, before he was cast into the "cauldron of knowledge", after which he became Taliesin, bard and seer.
Gwri m Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from Proto-Celtic *wiro- "man" (the source of modern Welsh gŵr "man, husband"). In the 'Mabinogion', this was the name given by Teyrnon to the infant Pryderi.
Gwyar f & m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "gore" or "spilled blood, bloodshed" in Old Welsh, but its more general meaning is "flow, fluidity".... [more]
Gyhldeptis f New World Mythology
She is a kindly forest goddess in Haida mythology whose name translates to "Lady Hanging Hair."
Gylfi m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Modern form of GylfR, an Old Norse name derived from gjalfr "roar, heavy sea" or gólf "grain cultivator". In Norse mythology, Gylfi was the name of a sea giant. It was also the name of a mythical Swedish king.
Gymir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse gymir meaning 'sea'. Gymir is a Jǫtunn in the Northern mythology.
Habetrot f Anglo-Saxon Mythology
A figure in folklore of the Border counties of Northern England and Lowland Scotland associated with spinning and the spinning wheel. ... [more]
Hábrók m & f Norse Mythology
Hábrók, as described by Grímnismál in Norse mythology, is the greatest of hawks, and literally translates to "high pants."
Habrote f Greek Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. In Greek myth Habrote or Abrota was the Boeotian wife of Nisos, king of Megara.
Hachiman m Japanese Mythology
Means "eight banners", from Japanese 八 (hachi) meaning "eight" and 幡 (man) meaning "flag, banner". In Japanese mythology, Hachiman is the god of archery, war, divination, and culture.
Hadda f Icelandic, Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Feminine form of Haddr. In Norse mythology Hadda is a giantess, the daughter of Svaði and the wife of Norr.
Hadiyaa f Hinduism
A gift from God
Hadraniel m Judeo-Christian Legend (?)
The name of an angel in Jewish Angelology.
Haemosu m Korean Mythology
A sun deity in Korean mythology. He is also the son of the god of Heaven, Chumong.
Hae-nim f Korean Mythology
The sun in Korean mythology. She is the sister to Dal-nim, the moon.
Haeva f Germanic Mythology
Haeva is a Germanic goddess known from an inscription in what is now the Netherlands. Scholars generally derive her name from Germanic *hiwan "to marry" and surmise that her function may have been the protection of the family.
Haim m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Marathi, Nepali, Bengali, Gujarati
MEANING - golden, consisting or made of gold, a name of lord Shiva, dew, hoar-frost, wintry, covered with snow... [more]
Haimini f Sanskrit, Indian (Modern), Hinduism, Tamil (Rare), Telugu, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Assamese, Nepali
MEANING - golden, made or consisting of gold, wintry. In ancient time, it was the name of a queen
Hakizimana m Rwandan, Rundi, African Mythology (Modern)
A name which means "God saves everything," imana being the name of the original Rwandan/Burundian deity and now the modern word for God in all monotheistic usages within Rwanda and Burundi.
Halcyoneus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ἁλκυονεύς (Halkyoneus), which is the masculine form of Halkyone (see Halcyone). In real life, Halcyoneus (also called Alcyoneus) was a son of Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedonia (3rd century BC).
Halia f Greek Mythology
Means "briny" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was the personification of sea salt, a sea nymph native to the Isle of Rhodes (sometimes believed to be one of the indigenous Rhodian gods) and the favourite of Poseidon... [more]
Halimede f Greek Mythology
Means "to think of the sea" from the Greek element ἅλς (hals) "the sea" combined with μηδομαι (medomai) "to think on, to be mindful of"... [more]
Halphas m Judeo-Christian Legend
A demon listed in the Ars Goetia
Haniel m Biblical, Judeo-Christian Legend, Brazilian
Variant of Hanniel used in the King James Version of 1 Chronicles 7:39, where it belongs to one of the sons of Ulla "and a prince and hero of the tribe of Asher"... [more]
Hanish m Near Eastern Mythology
A divine herald of storm and bad weather in Mesopotamian mythology.
Hannahannah f Near Eastern Mythology
From Hittite hanna- meaning "grandmother". She is a Hurrian Mother Goddess related to or influenced by the pre-Sumerian goddess Inanna. Hannahannah was also identified with the Hurrian goddess Hebat.
Hanuman m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Probably means "possessing a (large or disfigured) jaw" from Sanskrit हनु (hánu) meaning "cheek, jaw" and the suffix मत् (-mat) denoting possession. This is the name of a Hindu monkey god, the son of Anjana and Vayu.
Ḫapantali f Near Eastern Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Anatolian and Luwian pastoral goddess associated with sheep.
Hardin m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian, Gujarati, Marathi, Assamese, Bengali, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh), Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil
MEANING - feeling affection for, affectionate
Hariasa f Germanic Mythology
Hariasa is a Germanic goddess attested on a (now lost) stone bearing a Latin dedication to her. Her name is likely derived from Proto-Germanic *harja "army; battle". Linguist Siegfried Gutenbrunner reconstructed the form *Hari-ansus "army goddess; war goddess", while Rudolf Simek compares her name to that of the valkyrie Herja.
Harimella f Germanic Mythology
Harimella is a Germanic goddess known from an inscription in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. The first element of her name is derived from Germanic *xarjaz (harjaz) "army", the second element -mella is of debated origin and meaning... [more]
Hariti f Japanese Mythology
Hārītī (Sanskrit), also known as Kishimojin (鬼子母神?), is a Buddhist goddess for the protection of children, easy delivery, happy child rearing and parenting, harmony between husband and wife, love, and the well-being and safety of the family.
Harpalion m Greek Mythology
Derived from either Greek ἁρπαλέος (harpaleos) meaning "devouring, consuming, grasping" or the Greek verb ἁρπαλίζω (harpalizo) meaning "to catch up, to be eager to receive"... [more]
Harpalyce f Greek Mythology
This is the name of two minor characters in Greek mythology, one being a daughter of Harpalykos and the other a daughter of Clymenus... [more]
Harpalyke f Greek Mythology
One of the moons of Jupiter
Harpina f Greek Mythology (Archaic)
In Greek Mythology Harpina was a type of classified Naiad, namely a Potameides. She was said to inhabit the Pisa & Elis regions of Greece. She was the Mother of Oenomaus (by Ares).
Harpocrates m Greek Mythology
The Greek form of Horus... [more]
Hárr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Hǫr or derived from hárr ("grey-haired"). This is a name for Odin and the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Harshita f Hinduism
bengali name it meaans a person who is always happy and spreads happiness
Hartz m Basque Mythology, Medieval Basque, Basque
Means "bear" in Basque. In Basque mythology, a bear is considered a symbol of the resurrection and ancestor of man.
Hasinaw-uk-kamuy f Ainu, Japanese Mythology
Ainu goddess (Kamuy) of the hunt.
Hastséoltoi f New World Mythology, Navajo
The name of the goddess of the chase or hunt in Navajo mythology.
Hatepuna f Near Eastern Mythology
Her name originates in Hattic ha "sea" and puna "child". She is the daughter of the sea god and becomes the wife of Telipinu because of the rescue of Istanu.
Hati m & f Norse Mythology, Swedish (Rare), Finnish, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "despiser, hater". In Norse mythology Hati is a wolf who pursues the moon. He is the son of Hróðvitnir (another name for Fenrir), the father of Hrímgarðr, and the brother of Skǫll, who pursues the sun.
Haugspori m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "hill treader". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Haumea f Polynesian Mythology
From the goddess of fertility and childbirth in Hawaiian mythology. A notable use of the name is the third dwarf planet from the Sun and second dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt (located between Pluto and Makemake).
Healfdene m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Old English form of Halfdan. Healfdene (Halfdan in Old Norse) was a legendary Danish king who appeared in the epic poem Beowulf.
Hebat f Near Eastern Mythology
Hebat, was the mother goddess of the Hurrians, known as "the mother of all living". She is also a Queen of the deities. During Aramaean times Hebat also appears to have become identified with the goddess Hawwah, or Eve.
Hébé f Greek Mythology
French and Hungarian form of Hebe.
Hebo m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 河 (he, meaning “river”) and 伯 (bo, meaning “elder”, “earl” or “lord”). Hebo is the god of the Yellow River in Chinese mythology. He is attested as far back as the Chuci (楚辞) or Elegies of Chu, where he is described as a figure riding a dragon-powered chariot... [more]
Hedylogos m Greek Mythology
The Greek god of flattery and sweet talk, whose name is derived from ἡδῠ́ς (hedus) meaning "pleasant, sweet" and λόγος (logos) meaning "word, speech".
Hefring f Norse Mythology
Means "the lifting one" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology, Hefring was a billow maiden and one of nine daughters of Ægir and Rán.
Hegemone f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἡγεμόνη (hegemone) meaning "female leader, queen", which thus makes this name the feminine form of Hegemon.... [more]
Hegoa f Basque Mythology
Derived from Basque hego "wind" and, more specifically, "South wind".... [more]
Hegoi m Basque, Basque Mythology
The name of a god associated with the south wind in Basque mythology.
Heiðr m & f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from heiðr "bright, clear; honour", from which Heidi also derives. This is the name of several characters in Norse mythology: a giant, the son of Hrímnir; another name for the seeress Gullveig; and a name often given to witches or seeresses, possibly an epithet for "good" witches.
Hekateros m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek ἑκατερίς (hekateris), the name of a type of rustic dance which involved quickly moving hands. It has also been suggested that this may be a corruption of Greek ἑκ Δώρου (ek Dorou) meaning "of Doros", or may mean "each of two".
Hela m Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Vaianakh god of darkness.
Helblindi m Norse Mythology
Means "Hel-blinder" or "all-blinder" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this is the name of Loki's brother.
Heleia f Greek Mythology
From a Greek title of the goddess Artemis meaning "of marshes" (which may reflect her role as a goddess of streams and marshes). It is derived from Greek ἕλειος (heleios), from ἕλος (helos) "marsh-meadow"... [more]
Helenos m Greek Mythology
Masculine form of Helena. This was the name of a Trojan prince the son of king Priam and queen Hecuba of troy and the win brother of Cassandra.
Helenus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Helenos. Used various bishops and an obscure saint.
Helia f Greek Mythology, Galician (Rare)
Feminine form of Helios. This name was borne by one of the Heliades, daughters of the sun god Helios by Clymene the Oceanid and sisters of the ill-fated Phaethon... [more]
Helice f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Astronomy
Latinized form of Greek Ἑλικη (Helike) which means "circling one", from Greek ἕλιξ‎ (helix) "spiral" (genitive ἕλικος (helikos)). In antiquity, Helike was a common name for the northern constellation Ursa Major... [more]
Helie f Greek Mythology
One of the Heliades, seven daughters of Helios the sun god. When their brother Phaethon was struck from the chariot of the sun by Zeus, they gathered in their grief and were transformed into poplar-trees and their tears were transformed into golden amber... [more]
Helike f & m Greek Mythology
one of Jupiter's Ananke moons
Helka f Hungarian Mythology
The name of a fairy from the region around Lake Balaton. The origin and meaning of her name are uncertain, theories include a diminutive of Heléna.
Hellivesa f Germanic Mythology
A minor Germanic goddess whose functions have been lost to time. She was worshipped in Germania Inferior, a Roman province located on the west bank of the Rhine and bordering the North Sea.
Hemithea f Greek Mythology
Means "demigoddess" in Greek. In Greek myth this name belonged to a goddess who was formerly the mortal woman Molpadia. It was also borne by the sister of Tenes, locked in a chest with her brother and cast out to sea and together landing on an island where Tenes reigned as king... [more]
Henioche f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἡνίοχος (hêniochos) meaning "charioteer, driver, one who holds the reins", itself derived in part from the word ἡνία (hênia) "reins, bridle". In Greek mythology this was an epithet of the goddess Hera... [more]
Hephaestine f Greek Mythology
One of the wives of Aegyptus 1. Their children were: Idas 1, Daiphron 2, Pandion 1, Arbelus, Hyperbius 1, and Hippocorystes
Hepti m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "grasp". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Heptifíli m Norse Mythology
Combination of Hepti and Fíli. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Heqet f Egyptian Mythology
Heqet was an Egyptian goddess of fertility and was identified with Hathor. She was linked to the annual flooding of the Nile, and was represented as a frog.
Hercle m Etruscan Mythology
Etruscan equivalent of Heracules/Hercules.... [more]
Heremon m Irish Mythology
Irish Eireamhón. Possibly anglicised as Irving.
Heresh m Indian, Kurdish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "revolt" or "attack" in Kurdish.
Herfjǫtur f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from herr "army" and fjǫtur "fetter". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Herfǫðr m Norse Mythology
Derived from herr ("army") and faðir ("father"). This is a by-name for Odin.
Hergunnr f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of herr ("army") and gunnr ("battle, fight"). This is the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology.
Herja f Norse Mythology
Means "devastate" in Old Norse. The Prose Edda briefly mentions this name as that of a Valkyrie.
Hermaphroditos m Greek Mythology
Combination of Hermes and Aphrodite. In Greek mythology, this is the name of the only child that Hermes had with Aphrodite... [more]
Hermaphroditus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hermaphroditos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of the only child that Hermes had with Aphrodite. They were born a male, but acquired female genitalia in addition to their male ones, after one of the gods made their body merge with that of the naiad Salmacis.
Hermippe m & f French, Greek Mythology
Greek feminine and French masculine form of Hermippos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of the wife of Orchomenus, the son of Zeus.
Hermóðr m Norse Mythology
Variant of Hærmóðr. This is the name of one of Odin's sons.
Herne m Literature, Folklore
Herne the Hunter is a ghost first mentioned in Shakespeare's play "The Merry Wives of Windsor".
Herophile f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Herophilos. A known bearer of this name was Herophile of Erythrae, a Greek sibyl who is thought to have lived in the 8th century BC.
Herse f Greek Mythology
Means "dew" in Ancient Greek.... [more]
Hervǫr f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from herr "army" and vár "truth; woman". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology. Hervǫr is the daughter of Hlǫðver and the sister of Hlaðgunnr... [more]
Hesione f Greek Mythology
Said to mean "knowing" from Greek ἡσο (heso). In Greek mythology this was an epithet of Pronoia, the Titan goddess of foresight and wife of the Titan Prometheus; it was also borne by a legendary Trojan princess, a daughter of King Laomedon and sister to Priam... [more]
Hesperia f Greek Mythology, Spanish
Derived from Greek hesperos "evening" (see Hesperos). In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Hesperides, goddesses of the evening and sunsets... [more]
Hesperis f Greek Mythology
The goddess of the evening.
Hesychia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἡσυχία (hesychia) meaning "rest, quiet". In Greek mythology, this is the name of a daemon or spirit of quiet, rest, silence and stillness.
Hetha f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of a warrior-queen in Norse mythology.
Hicetaon m Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, but it may be related to ἱκνέομαι (hiknéomai) meaning "to come, reach, arrive" or ῑ̔́κω (hī́kō) meaning "to come, to arrive".
Hiera f Greek Mythology
Means "holy" in Ancient Greek.
Hierax m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἱέραξ (hierax) meaning "hawk, falcon". This was the name of a Spartan admiral from the 4th century BC.
Hiʻiaka f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Derived from Hawaiian hiʻi meaning "hold, carry" and aka "essence, embryo". This was the name of a Hawaiian goddess, the favorite sister of Pele.
Hikoboshi m Japanese, Astronomy, Japanese Mythology
This is the name of the star Altair in Japan. It literally means "Boy, Male Star". He's a mythological figure where he and his wife, Orihime (the Vega star), meet once every year on the 7th day of the 7th month... [more]
Hilaeira f Greek Mythology
Means "softly-shining" in Greek (probably from ἱλαρός (hilaros) "cheerful, bright"; compare Hilarius). In Greek myth the sisters Hilaeira and Phoebe, commonly referred to as the Leucippides (being daughters of Leucippus of Mycenae), were carried off by Castor and Pollux, who were charmed by their beauty... [more]
Hilaritas f Roman Mythology
Derived from hilaritas "hilarity", Hilaritas was a minor goddess who caused serenity.
Hillervo f & m Finnish Mythology, Finnish
Hillervo is the name of a fairy of Waterfalls and streams in Finnish Mythology.
Himalia f Greek Mythology
One of jupiter's moons
Himerope f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἵμερος (himeros) meaning "longing, yearning after" (as well as "desire, love" - compare Himeros) and οψ (ops) meaning "face, eye"... [more]
Himeros m Greek Mythology
Himeros is one of the Erotes, who are children of Aphrodite, typically depicted as cupid-like (Roman counterpart). He is often depicted with a bow and arrow to create lust and desire in people, and is representative of sexual desire and unrequited love
Himiko f Japanese Mythology
Meaning "sun daughter" or "sun child" or possibly "princess" in archaic Japanese. This is from Old Japanese hime (姫) meaning 'young noblewoman, princess', or from hi (日) 'sun' and me (女) 'woman' or miko (覡 or 巫女) 'shamaness, shrine maiden, priestess'... [more]
Himinglæva f Norse Mythology
Means 'the heaven-shining one, the transparent one", referring to the transparency of water. In Norse mythology, Himinglæva was one of nine daughters of Ægir and Rán.
Hina-moe-aitu f Polynesian Mythology
Feminine name meaning "Hina sleeping with a god". In this case, Hina is a variant form of Sina.
Hine-kau-ataata f Polynesian Mythology
Maori mythological character whose name means "Woman floating in shadows".
Hine-nui-te-pō f Polynesian Mythology
The name of the Maori goddess of night and death. Her name means "Great woman of night".
Hinon m New World Mythology
Means "thunder" in Iroquois. He was is the god of thunder in Iroquois and Wyandot mythology, where he is depicted as a thunderbird (the thunderbird is a symbol common to many Native American tribes, Hinon is only represented by the symbol by these specific peoples, not all).
Hippo f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "horse" in Greek. This was the name of several minor characters in Greek mythology.
Hippocoön m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hippokoon. This is the name of several characters from Greek mythology, one of which is a king of Sparta.
Hippodamia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "horse tamer", from the Ancient Greek hippos (ἵππος) "horse" and damazein (δαμάζειν) "to tame". This was another name of Briseis... [more]
Hippodice f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hippodike. In Greek mythology, Hippodice was a daughter of Danaus.
Hippodike f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" combined with Greek δικη (dike) meaning "justice, judgement" as well as "custom, usage".
Hippokoon m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" combined with κοῶ (koo), which is a contracted form of the Greek verb κοέω (koeo) meaning "to know, to be aware" as well as "to mark, to perceive, to hear"... [more]
Hippolochos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" combined with the Greek noun λόχος (lochos) meaning "ambush", a word that later came to signify a tactical sub unit of the ancient Greek army... [more]
Hippolochus m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Latinized form of Hippolochos. This name was borne by a Macedonian writer from the early 3rd century BC.... [more]
Hippomachos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective ἱππόμαχος (hippomachos) meaning "fighting on horseback", which consists of the Greek noun ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" combined with the Greek noun μάχη (mache) meaning "battle".... [more]
Hippomachus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hippomachos. This was the name of one of the Thirty Tyrants of Athens (5th century BC).... [more]
Hippomedon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "ruler of horses", derived from the Greek noun ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" combined with the Greek noun μέδων (medon) meaning "ruler" (see Medon).... [more]
Hippomedusa f Greek Mythology
Derived from ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and μεδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over".
Hippomenes m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "spirited horse", derived from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" combined with Greek μενος (menos) "power, strength, spirit." This name was borne by an eponymous archon of Athens, who lived in the 8th century BC.
Hipponome f Greek Mythology
Means "horse keeper" in Ancient Greek.
Hipponoos m Greek Mythology
Derived from ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and νόος (noos) meaning "mind".
Hipponous m Greek Mythology
Derived from ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and νόος (nóos) meaning "mind".
Hippothoe f Greek Mythology
Derived from ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and the feminine form of θοός (thoós) meaning "quick, swift".
Hippothoon m Greek Mythology
Derived from ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and θοός (thoós) meaning "quick, swift".
Hippothous m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "swift-riding".
Hirak m Hinduism
not sure about the history but the name means 'diamond keeper' and for the girls its hiral, which also means the same
Hiranyalakshmi f Indian, Hindi, Hinduism
Means "golden mark" in Sanskrit.
Hiro m Polynesian Mythology, Tahitian
Meaning unknown. Hiro was a demigod in Polynesian mythology.
Histiaea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Histiaia. In Greek mythology, the nymph Histiaea was one of the daughters of Hyrieus. The ancient town of Histiaea (later called Oreum) in northern Euboea was named in her honour.
Histiaia f Greek Mythology
The meaning of this Greek name is a bit uncertain; it may have been derived from Greek histia "feast" or from Greek histiē "hearth" (see Hestia)... [more]
Hjálmþér m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse hjalmr ("helmet, protection") and -þér ("servant"). In Norse mythology Hjálmþér and his brother Ǫlvir are the children of a jarl (or chieftain)... [more]
Hjalmþrimul f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hjalmr "helmet, protection" and þrima "battle, noise". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.
Hjǫrþrimul f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of hjǫrr 'sword' and þrima 'battle, noise'. This is also the name of a Valkyrie.
Hjúki m Norse Mythology
Is said to mean "the one returning to health". In Norse Mythology, Hjúki and his sister Bil follow Máni, the personification of the moon, across the heavens.
Hlaðgunnr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from hlað ("lace-work, headdress") and gunnr ("battle, fight"). This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who only appears in heroic poetry. Hlaðgunnr, also called Svanhvít, is the sister of Hervǫr and the daughter of Hlǫðver... [more]
Hlér m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "ocean, sea". This is another name for Ægir.
Hleðiólfr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from hleði ("shutter, door") and ulfr ("wolf"). This is another name for the dwarf Hlévargr in Norse mythology.
Hlévangr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Hlévargr or derived from hlé ("lee, shelter") and vangr ("garden"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Hlévargr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from hlé ("lee, shelter") and vargr ("thief, outlaw; wolf"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Hlín f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "protection" in Old Norse, the root of which is Old Icelandic hleina "to save, protect, defend" (ultimately relating to Old English hlæna and modern English lean; also "the related noun hlein is used of the upright warp-weighted loom, which is leaned against a wall in use")... [more]
Hlǫkk f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "noise; battle". This is the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology.
Hlǫðver m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Hlǫðvér. In Norse mythology this is the name of Hervǫr and Hlaðgunnr's father.
Hludana f Germanic Mythology
Hludana is a Germanic goddess attested in five ancient Latin inscriptions from the Rhineland and Frisia, all dating from 197–235 AD (the Beetgum inscription was dedicated by a group of fishermen)... [more]
Hnikarr m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Means "instigator". This is another name for Odin.
Hnoss f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "treasure". In Norse mythology this is the name of one of Freyja and Óðr's daughters.
Hodur m Ancient Scandinavian (Anglicized), Norse Mythology (Anglicized)
From Old Norse hǫð "battle", ultimately derived from Proto-Germanic *haþuz "battle". In Norse mythology Hodur is a blind son of Odin who accidentally kills Baldr when Loki gives him an arrow made of mistletoe (the only thing Baldr can be harmed by).
Hœnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly means "strong" or "helper". This is the name of a god in Norse mythology.
Hófvarpnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "hoof-thrower". This is the name of Gná's horse in Norse mythology.
Holler m Norse Mythology
In Norse myth, Holler is the god of death and destruction and the one who brings diseases and disasters. He drags people to his dungeon where he tortures them to death.
Homa f Persian, Persian Mythology
The name of a griffin- or phoenix-like bird in Iranian mythology and Sufi tradition.
Homi f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Gujarati, Indian, Marathi, Nepali, Bengali, Punjabi, Tamil, Kannada
MEANING - fire, clarified butter, water
Homini f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Marathi, Nepali, Indian, Sinhalese, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
MEANING - offerer of oblations, one who presents obalations
Hondscio m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
The first victim of Grendel in the Anglo Saxon epic of Beowulf. Means "handshoe", as in "glove", from 'hond' meaning hand, and 'scio', meaning shoe.
Hooshang m Persian Mythology, Persian
Alternate transcription of Houshang.
Hopleus m Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, perhaps related to ὁπλή (hoplḗ) meaning "hoof" or ὅπλον (hóplon) meaning “tool, arms”.
Horkos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek horkos "witness" and related to Greek horkion "oath". In Greek mythology, Horkos was the god of (false) oaths and a son of the goddess Eris.
Hǫrn f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Meaning unknown; possibly derived from hǫrr ("flax, linen"). This is another name for Freyja.
Hornbori m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown; possibly means "horn-blower" or "horn-bearer". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Hoth m Norse Mythology (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Hǫðr (cf. Hodur, a more common Anglicized form).
Houshang m Persian Mythology, Persian
From the Avestan name Haoshyangha possibly meaning "good choice" or "wise choice", from Proto-Iranian hu meaning "good, well" or Middle Persian ōš meaning "intelligence, wisdom" and a second uncertain element šyah perhaps meaning "selecting, deciding"... [more]
Houtu f Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 后 (hou, meaning “queen”) and 土 (tu, meaning “earth”). Houtu was the Chinese goddess of the earth who regulated all life above ground. In earlier Chinese texts she was also a goddess of the underworld, but later she was absorbed into the Daoist religion and became one of the main deities assisting the rule of Yudi.
Hou Yi m Chinese Mythology
From Chinese 后羿 (Hòuyì) meaning "king Yi" or "monarch Yi". In Chinese mythology this is the name of a legendary archer and the husband of the moon goddess Chang'e.
Hrani m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "rough, brutal; blusterer". This is a by-name for Odin.
Hreiðmarr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Germanic name elements hreiðr "nest, home" and mærr "famous". Hreiðmarr is a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Hremsa f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "clutch" or "shaft". This is the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology.
Hrímgarðr f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from hrīm "rime, hoarfrost" and garðr "enclosure, protection". In Norse mythology this is the name of a giantess, the daughter of Hati, who is drawn into a verbal duel with Atli.
Hrímgrímnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from hrīm ("rime, hoarfrost") and gríma ("person wearing a helmet"). It is an intensification of the name Grímnir. In Norse mythology this is the name of a giant who lives in the land of the dead... [more]
Hrímnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse hrīm ("rime, hoarfrost; soot"). This is the name of a giant in Norse mythology, the father of Heiðr and Hrossþjófr.
Hrishti f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Hinduism, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali, Bengali
MEANING : delight, joy, pride... [more]
Hrist f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "the shaker" from Old Norse hrista "shake, quake". In Norse poetry the name was frequently used as a kenning for "woman"; in mythology it belonged to a Valkyrie.
Hrǫnn f Norse Mythology
Means "wave" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology, Hrǫnn was a billow maiden and one of nine daughters of Ægir and Rán.
Hrossþjófr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from hross ("horse") and þjófr ("thief"). This is the name of a giant in Norse mythology.
Hróðvitnir m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from hróðr "fame, glory" and vitnir "wolf". This is another name for Fenrir.
Hrund f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Meaning unknown; possibly related to Old Norse hrinda ("prick, push"). This is the name of a Valkyrie.
Hrungnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from either hröngl ("tumult, movement") or hrang ("noise, din"). This is the name of a Jǫtunn.
Hrvat m Croatian (Rare), Slavic Mythology
An old Croatian name meaning ''Croat''.... [more]
Huaxu f Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 华 (huá, meaning “flower”, “luxuriance”) and 胥 (xū, meaning “all, each and every”). In Chinese mythology this name is borne by the mother of Fuxi and Nüwa... [more]
Hubal m Near Eastern Mythology
May mean "master god". From the Aramaic hu meaning 'spirit, god', and Ba'al 'master, lord'.... [more]