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BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIALLEN   f   Welsh
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BRIAN   m   Irish, English, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BRIANA   f   English
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in 'The Faerie Queene' (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANNE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRIAR   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRICE   m   French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRICIUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latin form of BRICE, probably ultimately of Gaulish origin.
BRÍD   f   Irish
Modern form of BRIGHID.
BRIDE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BRIDGER   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.
BRIDGET   f   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRIDGETTE   f   English
Variant of BRIDGET.
BRIDIE   f   Irish
Anglicized diminutive of BRÍD.
BRIELLA   f   English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLA.
BRIELLE   f   English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRÍGH   f   Irish
Derived from Irish brígh meaning "power, high".
BRIGHAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "bridge settlement" in Old English.
BRIGHID   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGID   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of BRIGHID.
BRÍGIDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIDA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIT   f   Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Latvian
Slovene, Croatian and Latvian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTA   f   German, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTE   f   German, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BRIJESH   m   Indian, Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi
Modern form of BRIJESHA.
BRIJESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "ruler of Brij" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, Brij being a region associated with him.
BRIN   m   Welsh
Variant of BRYN.
BRION   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRIONY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRYONY.
BRISCOE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
BRISEIDA   f   Literature
Form of BRISEIS used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
BRISEIS   f   Greek Mythology
Patronymic derived from Βρισευς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
BRÎSKA   f   Kurdish
Means "glitter" in Kurdish.
BRISTOL   m   English (Rare)
From the name of the city in southwest England which means "the site of the bridge".
BRIT   f   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BRITANNIA   f   English (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTANY   f   English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.
BRITTNY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITTON   m   English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROCK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BRODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRODY.
BRODY   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BROEN   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of BRUNO.
BROGAN   m & f   Irish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
BRON   f   Welsh
Short form of BRONWEN.
BRÓNACH   f   Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic brón meaning "sorrow". Saint Brónach was a 6th-century mystic from Ireland.
BRONAGH   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÓNACH.
BRONIMIR   m   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of BRANIMIR.
BRONISLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISLAVA   f   Czech, Slovak, Russian
Czech, Slovak and Russian feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISŁAW   m   Polish
Derived from the Slavic elements borna "protection" and slava "glory". A famous Polish anthropologist, Bronisław Malinowski (1884-1942), has borne this name.
BRONISŁAWA   f   Polish
Feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISLOVAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONIUS   m   Lithuanian
Short form of BRONISLOVAS.
BRONTE   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντη meaning "thunder".
BRONTES   m   Greek Mythology
Means "thunderer" in Greek. In Greek mythology (according to Hesiod), this was the name of one of the three Cyclopes, who were the sons of Uranus and Gaia.
BRONWEN   f   Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BRONWYN   f   Welsh
Variant of BRONWEN.
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BROOS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AMBROOS.
BRUCE   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. A notable bearer is the American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-).
BRUNA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BRUNELLA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of BRUNO.
BRÜNHILD   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the Valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
BRUNHILDA   f   History
Variant of BRÜNHILD, referring to the Frankish queen.
BRUNIHILD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNILDA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNO   m   German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BRUTUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "heavy" in Latin. Famous bearers include Lucius Junius Brutus, the traditional founder of the Roman Republic, and Marcus Junius Brutus, the statesman who conspired to assassinated Julius Caesar.
BRYAN   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRYANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYCE   m   English
Variant of BRICE.
BRYGIDA   f   Polish
Polish form of BRIDGET.
BRYN   m & f   Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Norwegian form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNHILDR   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of BRÜNHILD. In the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga' Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
BRYNHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNJA   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
BRYNJAR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements bryn "armour" and arr "warrior".
BRYNJARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BRYNJAR.
BRYNMOR   m   Welsh
From a Welsh place name meaning "great hill".
BRYNN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYNNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYON   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYONY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BUANA   m   Indonesian
Means "the world" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit भुवन (bhuvana).
BUCK   m   English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUD   m   English
Short form of BUDDY.
BUDDHA   m   History
Means "enlightened" in Sanskrit. This is a title applied to Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, as well as to a handful of other enlightened individuals.
BUDDY   m   English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BUDI   m   Indonesian
Means "reason, mind, character" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit बुद्धि (buddhi) meaning "intellect" (related to Buddha).
BUDUR   f   Arabic
Strictly feminine form of BADR.
BUENAVENTURA   m   Spanish
Spanish form of BONAVENTURA.
BUFFY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH, from a child's pronunciation of the final syllable. It is now associated with the main character from the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
BUĞRA   m   Turkish
Means "baby camel" in Turkish.
BÚI   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BO (1).
BULAN   f   Indonesian
Means "moon" (or "month") in Indonesian.
BULAT   m   Kazakh
Variant transcription of BOLAT.
BÜLENT   m   Turkish
Means "high, mighty" in Turkish.
BULUS   m   Arabic
Arabic form of PAUL.
BULUT   m   Turkish
Means "cloud" in Turkish.
BUNNY   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BÜNYAMİN   m   Turkish
Turkish form of BENJAMIN.
BURAK   m   Turkish
From Arabic براق (Buraq), the name of the legendary creature that, according to Islamic tradition, transported the Prophet Muhammad. Its name is derived from Arabic برق (barq) "lightning".
BURÇİN   f & m   Turkish
Means "hind, doe" in Turkish.
BURCU   f   Turkish
Means "sweet smelling, fragrant" in Turkish.
BURGUNDY   f   English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BURHAN   m   Arabic, Turkish
Means "proof" in Arabic.
BURKE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
BURKHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
BURT   m   English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
BUSTER   m   English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
BUTRUS   m   Arabic, Coptic
Arabic form of PETER.
BUZ   m   Biblical
Means "contempt" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of ABRAHAM's brother Nahor in the Old Testament.
BYELOBOG   m   Slavic Mythology
Means "the white god" from Slavic byelo "white" and bogu "god". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sun, happiness and fortune.
BYEONG-HO   m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (byeong) meaning "bright, luminous, glorious" combined with (ho) meaning "great, numerous, vast" or (ho) meaning "summer, sky, heaven". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
BYRNE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BYRON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of 'Don Juan' and many other works.
BYSSHE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
BYUNG-HO   m   Korean
Variant transcription of BYEONG-HO.
CÄCILIA   f   German
German form of CECILIA.
CÄCILIE   f   German
German form of CECILIA.
CADE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
CADELL   m   Welsh
From Welsh cad "battle" and a diminutive suffix.
CADEN   m   English (Modern)
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Gaelic surname Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable aden suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
CADENCE   f   English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CADERINA   f   Sardinian
Sardinian form of KATHERINE.
CADEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CADFAEL   m   Welsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
CADFAN   m   Welsh
Means "battle peak" from Welsh cad "battle" and ban "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
CADI   f   Welsh
Short form of CATRIN.
CADMUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καδμος (Kadmos), of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology Cadmus was the son of the Phoenician king Agenor. He was sent by his father to rescue his sister Europa, who had been abducted by Zeus, although he did not succeed in retrieving her. According to legend, Cadmus founded the city of Thebes and introduced the alphabet to Greece.
CADOC   m   Welsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADOGAN   m   Welsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CADWALADER   m   Welsh
Means "leader of the battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a Welsh saint of the 7th century.
CADWGAN   m   Welsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CAECILIA   f   German, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAECILIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original masculine form of CECILIA.
CAEDMON   m   History
Meaning unknown, though the first element is likely connected to Brythonic caed meaning "battle". Saint Caedmon was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poet who supposedly received his poetic inspiration from a dream. Our only knowledge of him is through the historian Bede.
CÁEL   m   Irish Mythology
From Gaelic caol "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CAELAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAELESTINUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name, a derivative of CAELESTIS. This name was borne by five popes (usually spelled Celestine in English).
CAELESTIS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name which meant "of the sky, heavenly".
CAELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELIUS.
CAELIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEE.
CAELINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELINUS.
CAELINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was itself derived from the Roman family name CAELIUS.
CAELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin caelum meaning "heaven".
CAERWYN   m   Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
CAESAR   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
CAESARIUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name which was derived from CAESAR. Saint Caesarius was a 6th-century bishop of Arles.
CAETANO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CAETLIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CAITLIN.
ÇAĞATAY   m   Turkish
From the Mongolian name Chagatai (of unknown meaning), which was borne by the second son of Genghis Khan.
ÇAĞLA   f   Turkish
Means "almonds" in Turkish.
ÇAĞRI   f   Turkish
Means "invitation" in Turkish.
CAHAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAL.
CAHAYA   m & f   Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
CAHIR   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAIR.
CAHYA   m & f   Indonesian
Variant of CAHAYA.
CAHYO   m & f   Indonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of CAHAYA.
CAI (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of KAI (1).
CAIAPHAS   m   Biblical
Meaning unknown, probably of Aramaic origin. In the New Testament this is the name of the Jewish high priest who condemns Jesus.
CAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
CAIETANUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of GAETANO.
CAILEAN   m   Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAILEIGH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEIGH.
CAILIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLYN. It also coincides with the Irish word cailín meaning "girl".
CAILYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KAYLYN.
CAIN   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
CAINAN   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Variant of KENAN.
CAINNEACH   m   Irish
Irish form of COINNEACH.
CAIO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of GAIUS.
CAIRBRE   m   Irish, Scottish
Means "charioteer" in Gaelic.
CAIRISTÌONA   f   Scottish
Scottish form of CHRISTINA.
CAIRO   m   English (Rare)
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
CAISIDE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
CÁIT   f   Irish
Short form of CAITRÍONA.
CAITLÍN   f   Irish
Irish form of Cateline, the Old French form of KATHERINE.
CAITLIN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CAITLYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CAITLIN.
CAITRIA   f   Irish
Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA.
CAITRÍONA   f   Irish
Irish form of KATHERINE.
CAITRÌONA   f   Scottish
Scottish form of KATHERINE.
CAIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman variant of GAIUS.
CAJ   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of KAI (1).
CAJA   f   Danish
Variant of KAJA (1).
CAJETAN   m   History
English form of CAIETANUS.
CAJSA   f   Swedish
Variant of KAJSA.
CAL   m   English
Short form of CALVIN.
CALANTHE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CALANTHIA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALBHACH   m   Irish
Means "bald" in Irish Gaelic.
CALE   m   English
Short form of CALEB.
CALEB   m   English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
CALEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KAYLEIGH.
CALFURAY   f   Native American, Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
CALIGULA   m   History
Means "little boot" in Latin. This was a nickname for the Roman emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus given to him in his youth by his father's soldiers.
CALISTA   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALISTO   m   Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of CALLISTUS.
CALIXTA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of CALIXTUS.
CALIXTE   m   French
French form of CALIXTUS.
CALIXTO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CALIXTUS.
CALIXTUS   m   Late Roman
Variant of CALLISTUS, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
CALLA   f   English
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CALLAHAN   m   English
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".
CALLEIGH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CALLIE.
CALLIAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLIAS.
CALLIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.
CALLISTA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CALISTA.
CALLISTO (1)   m   Italian
Italian form of CALLISTUS.
CALLISTO (2)   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
CALLISTUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name which was derived from the Greek name Καλλιστος (Kallistos) "most beautiful". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callixtus), including the 3rd-century Callistus I who is regarded as a saint.
CALLIXTUS   m   Late Roman
Variant of CALLISTUS, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
CALLUM   m   Scottish
Variant of CALUM.
CALOGERA   f   Italian
Feminine form of CALOGERO.
CALOGERO   m   Italian
From the Late Latin name Calogerus which meant "beautiful elder" from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and γερων (geron) "old man, elder". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a hermit of Sicily.
CALOGERUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of CALOGERO.
CALUM   m   Scottish
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALVAGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CALBHACH.
CALVIN   m   English
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
CALVUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "bald" in Latin.
CALYPSO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CAM (1)   f   Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
CAM (2)   m & f   English
Short form of CAMERON.
CAMBRIA   f   Various
Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.
CAMBYSES   m   History
From Καμβυσης (Kambyses), the Greek form of the Old Persian name Kambujiya, which is of unknown meaning. Two Persian kings bore this name, including Cambyses II who conquered Egypt.
CAMDEN   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAMELIA   f   Romanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CAMERON   m & f   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAMILLO   m   Italian
Italian form of CAMILLUS.
CAMILLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.
CAMILO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLUS.
CAMMIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAMILLA.
CAMPBELL   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CAMRON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CAMERON.
CAMRYN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of CAMERON.
CAN   m   Turkish
Means "soul, life" in Turkish.
CANAAN   m   Biblical
Meaning unknown. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor of the Canaanite people.
CANAN   f   Turkish
Means "beloved" in Turkish.
CANDACE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the hereditary title of the queens of Ethiopia, as mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It is apparently derived from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen mother". In some versions of the Bible it is spelled Kandake, reflecting the Greek spelling Κανδακη. It was used as a given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 20th century by a character in the movie 'Meet the Stewarts' (1942).
CANDE   f & m   Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA or CANDELARIO.
CANDELA   f   Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELARIA   f   Spanish
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
CANDELARIO   m   Spanish
Masculine form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELAS   f   Spanish
Diminutive of CANDELARIA.
CANDI   f   English
Variant of CANDY.
CANDICE   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CÁNDIDA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of CANDIDA.
CÂNDIDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CANDIDA.
CANDIDA   f   Late Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play 'Candida' (1898).
CANDIDE   m & f   French
French form of CANDIDUS or CANDIDA.
CÁNDIDO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of CANDIDUS.
CÂNDIDO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CANDIDUS.
CANDIDUS   m   Late Roman
Masculine form of CANDIDA. This name was borne by a few early saints and martyrs.
CANDIS   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANDY   f   English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CANDYCE   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANSU   f   Turkish
From Turkish can meaning "soul, life" and su meaning "water".
CANUTE   m   History
Anglicized form of KNUT.
CAOILEANN   f   Irish
Variant of CAOILFHIONN.
CAOILFHIONN   f   Irish
Derived from the Gaelic elements caol "slender" and fionn "fair". This was the name of several Irish saints.
CAOILINN   f   Irish
Variant of CAOILFHIONN.
CAOIMHE   f   Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CAOIMHÍN   m   Irish
Irish form of KEVIN.
CAOLÁN   m   Irish
From Gaelic caol "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
CAOMH   m   Ancient Irish
Masculine form of CAOIMHE.
CAOMHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Diminutive of CAOMH. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CAPRICE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
CAPRICIA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CAPRICE.
CAPRINA   f   Various
From the name of the Italian island of Capri.
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