All Names

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ADOMAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ADAM.
ADONAI m Theology
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
ADONIJAH m Biblical
Means "my lord is YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is the name of one of King David's sons in the Old Testament. Though he was the eldest surviving son of David, he was passed over as heir to the throne in favour of Solomon.
ADONIRAM m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "my lord is exalted" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of an overseer of tribute under the kings David, Solomon and Rehoboam. He was stoned to death when the Israelites revolted.
ADONIS m Greek Mythology
From Phoenician adon meaning "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see DUMUZI).
ADORA f Spanish
Short form of ADORACIÓN.
ADORACIÓN f Spanish
Means "adoration" in Spanish. This name refers to the event that is known in Christian tradition as the Adoration of the Magi, which is when the three Magi presented gifts to the infant Jesus and worshipped him.
ADORINDA f Esperanto
Means "adorable" in Esperanto.
ADORJÁN m Hungarian
Hungarian form of ADRIAN.
ADRASTEA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ADRASTEIA. One of Jupiter's moons bears this name.
ADRASTEIA f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ADRASTOS. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.
ADRASTOS m Greek Mythology
Means "not inclined to run away" in Greek. This was the name of a king of Argos in Greek legend.
ADRIA f English
Short form of ADRIANA.
ADRIÀ m Catalan
Catalan form of ADRIAN.
ADRIAAN m Dutch
Dutch form of ADRIAN.
ADRIÁN m Spanish, Hungarian, Slovak
Spanish, Hungarian and Slovak form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN).
ADRIAN m English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ADRIANNA f English, Polish
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANNE f English
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANO m Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANUS m Dutch
Official Dutch form of ADRIAN, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
ADRIEL m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "flock of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a man who married Saul's daughter Merab.
ADRIEN m French
French form of ADRIAN.
ADRIENE f Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian variant of ADRIANA.
ADRIENN f Hungarian
Hungarian feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIENNE f French
French feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIJAN m Croatian, Macedonian
Croatian and Macedonian form of ADRIAN.
ADRIJANA f Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Slovene, Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADSILA f Native American, Cherokee
Means "blossom" in Cherokee.
ADVA f Hebrew
Means "small wave, ripple" in Hebrew.
ADWOA f Western African, Akan
Means "born on Monday" in Akan.
ÆBBE f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EBBA (2).
ÁEDÁN m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.
ÁEDH m Ancient Irish
Variant of ÁED.
AEGIDIUS m Late Roman
Original Latin form of GILES.
AEGLE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αἴγλη (Aigle), which meant "light, radiance, glory". This was the name of several characters in Greek myth, including one of the Heliades and one of the Hesperides.
ÆLFFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements ælf "elf" and flæd "beauty".
ÆLFGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALGAR.
ÆLFGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
ÆLFHEAH m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLFNOÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALFRED.
ÆLFRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "ruler".
ÆLFSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFSWIÞ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
ÆLFÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFREDA.
ÆLFTHRYTH f Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ælfþryð (see ELFREDA).
ÆLFWEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman Conquest.
AELIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AELIUS.
AELIANA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AELIANUS.
AELIANUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of AELIUS.
AELIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was possibly derived from the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun". This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
AELLA f Greek Mythology
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.
ÆLRED m Anglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
AEMILIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
AEMILIANA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
AEMILIANUS m Ancient Roman
Original Roman form of EMILIANO.
AEMILIUS m Ancient Roman
Original Roman form of EMIL.
AENEAS m Roman Mythology
Latin form of the Greek name Αἰνείας (Aineias), derived from Greek αἴνη (aine) meaning "praise". In Greek legend he was a son of Aphrodite and was one of the chief heroes who defended Troy from the Greeks. The Roman poet Virgil continued his story in the Aeneid, in which Aeneas travels to Italy and founds the Roman state.
AENGUS m Irish
Variant of AONGHUS.
AENOR f Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name of unknown meaning. This was the name of the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
AERON m & f Welsh
Derived either from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of the River Aeron in Wales.
AERONA f Welsh
Variant of AERON.
AERONWEN f Welsh
Combination of AERON and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AERONWY f Welsh
Extended form of AERON.
ÆSC m Anglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
AESCHYLUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αἰσχύλος (Aischylos), derived from αἶσχος (aischos) meaning "shame". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian historian.
AESON m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αἰσών (Aison), which is of unknown meaning. Aeson was the father of Jason in Greek mythology.
AESOP m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek Αἴσωπος (Aisopos), which is of unknown meaning. This was the name of a Greek fabulist of the 6th century BC, famous for such tales as The Tortoise and the Hare. Though his existence is uncertain, he was later said to have been a slave on the island of Samos.
ÆÐELBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint. It became unused after the Normans introduced their form of Adalbert after their invasion.
ÆÐELFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements æðel "noble" and flæd "beauty". Æðelflæd was a 10th-century queen of Mercia.
ÆÐELFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and friþ "peace". The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ÆÐELMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of ADELMAR.
ÆTHELNOÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and noð "boldness, daring".
ÆÐELRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ÆÐELRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "ruler". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
ÆÐELSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, the first to rule all of England. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, though it enjoyed a modest revival (as Athelstan) in the 19th century.
ÆÐELÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength".
ÆTHELWEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element æðel "noble" combined with weard "guardian".
ÆÐELWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
AETIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was probably derived from Greek ἀετός (aetos) meaning "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
AFAF f Arabic
Means "chastity" in Arabic.
AFANASIY m Russian
Russian form of ATHANASIUS.
AFANASY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Афанасий (see AFANASIY).
AFANEN f Welsh (Rare)
Means "raspberry" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AFËRDITA f Albanian
Means "daybreak, morning" in Albanian, from afër "nearby, close" and ditë "day".
AFIF m Arabic
Means "chaste" in Arabic.
AFOLABI m Western African, Yoruba
Means "born into wealth" in Yoruba.
AFON f & m Welsh
Means "river" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
AFONSO m Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of ALFONSO.
AFRA (1) f Late Roman
Originally used by the Romans as a nickname for a woman from Africa. This was the name of two early saints.
AFRA (2) f Arabic
Means "whitish red" in Arabic.
ÁFRICA f Spanish
Spanish form of AFRICA (1). It is usually taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de África, the patron saint of the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa.
AFRICA (1) f African American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
AFRICA (2) f Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of AIFRIC.
AFRICANUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from the place name AFRICA, which in Roman times referred only to North Africa. This was the agnomen of the 3rd-century BC Roman general Scipio Africanus, who was honoured with it after his victory over Carthage in the Second Punic War. His descendants used it as a cognomen.
AFRIM m Albanian
Means "approach" in Albanian.
AFRODITI f Greek
Modern Greek form of APHRODITE.
AFSOON f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian افسون (see AFSOUN).
AFSOUN f Persian
Means "charm, spell" in Persian.
AFSUN f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian افسون (see AFSOUN).
AFUA f Western African, Akan
Means "born on Friday" in Akan.
AFZAL m Arabic
Means "better, superior" in Arabic.
AGAFYA f Russian
Russian form of AGATHA.
AGAM f & m Hebrew
Means "lake" in Hebrew.
AGAMEMNON m Greek Mythology, Greek
Possibly means "very steadfast" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was the brother of Menelaus. He led the Greek expedition to Troy to recover his brother's wife Helen. After the Trojan War Agamemnon was killed by his wife Clytemnestra.
AGAPE f Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ἀγάπη (agape) meaning "love". This name was borne by at least two early saints.
AGAPETOS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of AGAPITO.
AGAPETUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Agapetos (see AGAPITO).
AGAPI f Greek
Modern Greek form of AGAPE.
AGAPIOS m Greek, Ancient Greek
Masculine form of AGAPE. This was the name of a saint from Caesarea who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
AGAPITO m Spanish, Italian
From the Late Latin name Agapitus or Agapetus, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀγαπητός (Agapetos) meaning "beloved". The name Agapetus was borne by two popes.
AGAPITOS m Greek
Modern Greek form of AGAPITO.
AGAR f Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical French, Biblical Italian
Form of HAGAR used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
AGÁTA f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of AGATHA.
AGATA f Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Form of AGATHA in various languages.
AGATHA f English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGATHANGELOS m Late Greek
Means "bearer of good news", derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good" and ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger, angel". Saint Agathangelus of Rome was a 4th-century deacon who was martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian.
AGATHE f French, German, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Greek
Form of AGATHA in several languages.
AGATHI f Greek
Modern Greek form of AGATHA.
AGATHINUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀγαθίνος (Agathinos), derived from ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good".
AGATHON m Ancient Greek
Greek masculine form of AGATHA.
AGATINO m Italian
Italian form of AGATHINUS.
AGATKA f Polish
Polish diminutive of AGATA.
AGAUE f Greek Mythology
Means "illustrious, noble" in Greek. This was the mother of Pentheus in Greek myth.
AGDA f Swedish
Swedish form of AGATHA.
ÅGE m Norwegian
Norwegian form of ÁKI.
AGE (1) m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
AGE (2) f Estonian
Estonian form of AGNES.
AGGIE f English
Diminutive of AGNES or AGATHA.
AGHAVNI f Armenian
Means "dove" in Armenian.
AGHI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of OVE.
AGHIL m Persian
Persian form of AQIL.
ÁGI f Hungarian
Diminutive of ÁGOTA or ÁGNES.
AGI m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ag meaning "edge of a sword".
AGILULF m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
AGIM m Albanian
Means "dawn" in Albanian.
AGLAÉ f French
French form of AGLAIA.
AGLAIA f Greek Mythology, Greek
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
AGLAYA f Russian
Russian form of AGLAIA.
AGMUNDR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of AMUND.
AGNAR m Norwegian, Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Agnarr, derived from agi "awe, terror" or egg "edge of a sword" combined with arr "warrior".
AGNARR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of AGNAR.
AGNĖ f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of AGNES.
AGNER m Danish
Danish form of AGNAR.
ÁGNES f Hungarian
Hungarian form of AGNES.
AGNÈS f French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AGNES f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
AGNEŠA f Slovak
Slovak variant of AGNES.
AGNESA f Slovak, Albanian
Slovak and Albanian form of AGNES.
AGNESE f Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGNESSA f Russian
Russian form of AGNES.
AGNETA f Swedish
Swedish variant of AGNES.
AGNETE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AGNEZA f Croatian
Croatian form of AGNES.
AGNI (1) m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fire" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the ancient Hindu fire god, usually depicted as red-skinned with three legs, seven arms, and two faces.
AGNI (2) f Greek
Modern Greek form of AGNES.
AGNIESZKA f Polish
Polish form of AGNES.
AGNIJA f Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGNIYA f Russian (Rare)
Russian form of AGNES.
AGOSTINA f Italian
Italian feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGOSTINHO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGOSTINO m Italian
Italian form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
ÁGOSTON m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
ÅGOT f Norwegian
Norwegian form of AGATHA.
ÁGOTA f Hungarian
Hungarian form of AGATHA.
AGRAFENA f Russian
Russian form of AGRIPPINA.
AGRIPPA m & f Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from a combination of Greek ἄγριος (agrios) meaning "wild" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" or alternatively of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AGRIPPINA f Ancient Roman
Feminine derivative of AGRIPPA. This name was borne by the scheming mother of the Roman emperor Nero, who eventually had her killed. This was also the name of a 3rd-century Roman saint who is venerated in Sicily.
AGRONA f Celtic Mythology
Perhaps derived from an old Celtic element agro meaning "battle, slaughter". This is possibly the name of a Brythonic goddess for whom the River Ayr in Scotland was named.
ÁGUEDA f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AGATHA.
AGUNG m Indonesian
Means "great, large" in Indonesian.
AGURNE f Basque
From Basque agur meaning "greeting, salutation".
AGURTZANE f Basque
From Basque agurtza meaning "greeting, salutation".
AGUS m Indonesian
Variant of BAGUS.
AGUSTÍ m Catalan
Catalan form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGUSTÍN m Spanish
Spanish form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGUSTINA f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AH m & f Chinese
From the Chinese character (ā), which has no distinct meaning. It is not normally given as a name, but it can be prefixed to another name to make it a diminutive.
AHAB m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "uncle", from Hebrew אָח ('ach) meaning "brother" and אָב ('av) meaning "father". This was the name of a king of Israel, the husband of Jezebel, as told in the Old Testament. He was admonished by Elijah for his sinful behaviour. Herman Melville later used this name in his novel Moby-Dick (1851), where it belongs to a sea captain obsessively hunting for a white whale.
AHAVA f Hebrew
Means "love" in Hebrew.
AHENOBARBUS m Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen meaning "bronze beard" in Latin. This name was borne by a series of consuls of the late Roman Republic.
AHINOAM f Biblical
Means "my brother is pleasant" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of wives of both Saul and David.
ƏHMƏD m Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of AHMAD.
AHMAD m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Pashto, Indonesian, Malay, Avar
Means "most commendable, most praiseworthy" in Arabic (a superlative form of HAMID (1)).
AHMED m Turkish, Bosnian, Dhivehi, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto
Turkish, Bosnian and Dhivehi form of AHMAD. This was the name of three Ottoman sultans.
AHMET m Turkish
Turkish form of AHMAD.
AHMOSE m Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Egyptian Iah-ms meaning "born of Iah", derived from the name of the Egyptian god IAH combined with mesu "be born". This was the name of the first pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. He defeated the Hyksos and drove them from Egypt.
AHOTH m Biblical Latin
Form of EHUD used in the Latin Old Testament.
AHRIMAN m Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of ANGRA MAINYU.
AHTAHKAKOOP m Native American, Cree
Means "star blanket" in Cree. This was the name of an early 19th-century Cree chief.
AHTI m Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
AHURA MAZDA m Persian Mythology
Means "lord of wisdom" in Avestan. In Persian mythology Ahura Mazda was the supreme creator, and the god of light, truth, and goodness.
AHUVA f Hebrew
Means "beloved" in Hebrew.
AI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AI (2) f Chinese
From Chinese (ài) meaning "love, affection", (ǎi) meaning "friendly, lush", or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
AIAS m Greek Mythology
Greek form of AJAX.
AIBEK m Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Derived from Turkic ay "moon" combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
AÏCHA f Arabic (Maghrebi)
Form of AISHA used in Northern Africa and other French-influenced regions of the continent.
AÏCHATOU f Western African
Form of AISHA used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
AIDA f Arabic, Literature
Variant of AYDA. This name was used in Verdi's opera Aida (1871), where it belongs to an Ethiopian princess held captive in Egypt.
AIDAN m Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIDAY f Kazakh
Means "moon child" in Kazakh.
AIDEEN f Irish
Anglicized form of ÉTAÍN.
AIFRIC f Irish, Scottish
Possibly means "pleasant" in Irish.
AIGERIM f Kazakh
Means "wonderful moon", from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and керім (kerim) meaning "wonderful".
AIGLE f Greek Mythology
Greek form of AEGLE.
AIGNÉIS f Irish
Irish form of AGNES.
AIGUL f Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Kazakh and Kyrgyz form of AYGÜL.
AIKATERINE f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of KATHERINE.
AIKATERINI f Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Αικατερίνη (see EKATERINI).
AIKE m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
AIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other character combinations.
AILA f Finnish
Finnish form of ÁILE.
AILBHE f & m Irish
Possibly derived from the old Irish root albho meaning "white" or ail meaning "rock". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint, the founder of a monastery at Emly.
ÁILE f Sami
Sami form of HELGA.
AILEAS f Scottish
Scottish form of ALICE.
AILI f Finnish
Finnish form of ÁILE.
AILILL m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
AILÍN m Irish
Irish cognate of ALAN.
AILÍS f Irish
Irish form of ALICE.
AILPEIN m Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of ALPIN.
AILSA f Scottish
From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.
AIMAN (1) f Kazakh
Means "beauty of the moon" in Kazakh.
AIMAN (2) m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic أيمن (see AYMAN).
AIMÉ m French
From Old French Amé, the masculine form of Amée (see AMY).
AIMÉE f French
French form of AMY.
AIMEE f English
Variant of AMY, influenced by French AIMÉE.
AIMI f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AIMILIOS m Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Αιμίλιος (see EMILIOS).
AIMO m Finnish
Means "generous amount" in Finnish.
AINA (1) f Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of AINO. It also means "always" in Finnish.
AINA (2) f Catalan
Balearic form of ANNA.
AINA (3) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
AINA (4) f Latvian
Feminine form of AINĀRS.
AINA (5) f Kazakh
Means "mirror" in Kazakh, ultimately from Persian آینه (ayneh).
AINARA f Basque, Spanish
Variant of ENARA.
AINĀRS m Latvian
From Latvian aina meaning "scene, sight".
AINDREA m Scottish
Scottish form of ANDREW.
AINDRÉAS m Irish
Irish form of ANDREW.
AINDRIÚ m Irish
Irish form of ANDREW.
ÁINE f Irish
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.
AINEIAS m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of AENEAS.
AINGEAL f Irish
Irish cognate of ANGELA.
AINGERU m Basque
Basque form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
AINHOA f Basque
From the name of a town in southwest France where there is a famous image of the Virgin Mary.
AINO f Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "the only one" in Finnish. In the Finnish epic the Kalevala this is the name of a girl who drowns herself when she finds out she must marry the old man Väinämöinen.
AINOA f Spanish
Spanish form of AINHOA.
AINSLEY f & m Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AINTZA f Basque
Means "glory" in Basque.
AINTZANE f Basque
Variant of AINTZA.
AINUR f Kazakh
Kazakh form of AYNUR.
AINURA f Kyrgyz
Kyrgyz form of AYNUR.
AIOLOS m Greek Mythology
Means "quick-moving, nimble" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of the winds.
AIRA f Finnish
Variant of AIRI (2).
AIRI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AIRI (2) f Finnish
From Finnish airut meaning "messenger, herald", also influenced by place names beginning with the same sound.
'AISHA f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عائشة (see AISHA).
A'ISHA f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عائشة (see AISHA).
AISHA f Arabic, Urdu, American
Means "alive" in Arabic. This was the name of Muhammad's third wife, the daughter of Abu Bakr. Some time after Muhammad's death she went to war against Ali, the fourth caliph, but was defeated. This name is used more by Sunni Muslims and less by Shias.... [more]
AISHAH f Arabic, Malay
Alternate transcription of Arabic عائشة (see AISHA), as well as the usual Malay form.
AISHAT f Chechen
Chechen form of AISHA.
AISHATH f Dhivehi
Dhivehi form of AISHA.
AISHWARYA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "prosperity, wealth" in Sanskrit. A famous bearer is the Indian actress Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (1973-).
AISLIN f Irish
Variant of AISLING.
AISLING f Irish
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish Gaelic. This name was created in the 20th century.
AISLINN f Irish
Variant of AISLING.
AISOPOS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of AESOP.
AÏSSA f Western African
Form of AISHA used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
AÏSSATOU f Western African
Form of AISHA used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
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