All Names

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CAPUCINE   f   French
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARA   f   English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARADOC   m   Welsh
Variant of CARADOG.
CARADOG   m   Welsh
Welsh form of CARATACOS. This is the name of several figures in Welsh history and legend, including a 6th-century king of Gwent and a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian romance.
CARAMIA   f   Various
From the Italian phrase cara mia meaning "my beloved".
CARATACOS   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from the Celtic element car meaning "love". This was the name of a 1st-century British chieftain who rebelled against Roman rule.
CARBREY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARBRY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARDEA   f   Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin cardo meaning "hinge, axis". This was the name of the Roman goddess of thresholds, door pivots, and change.
CAREEN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CARREEN.
CAREN   f   English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARI   f   English
Variant of CARRIE.
CARIDAD   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.
CARIN   f   Swedish
Variant of KARIN.
CARINA (1)   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARINE   f   French
French form of CARINA (1). It can also function as a short form of CATHERINE, via Swedish Karin.
CARIS   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CHARIS.
CARISSA   f   English
Variant of CHARISSA.
CARITA   f   Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
CARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CARLENE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of CARL.
CARLES   m   Catalan
Catalan form of CHARLES.
CARLETON   m   English
Variant of CHARLTON.
CARLEY   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLIE   f   English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLINHOS   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of CARLOS.
CARLISA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of CARLA and LISA.
CARLISLE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
CARLITO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Diminutive of CARLOS.
CARLITOS   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Diminutive of CARLOS.
CARLMAN   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of CARLOMAN.
CARLO   m   Italian
Italian form of CHARLES.
CARLOMAN   m   History, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name derived from karl (see CHARLES) and man "man". This was the name of several Frankish rulers, including the 8th-century Carloman I who ruled jointly with his brother Charlemagne for a time.
CARLOS   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLES.
CARLOTA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLOTTE.
CARLOTTA   f   Italian
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CARLTON   m   English
Variant of CHARLTON.
CARLY   f   English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLYLE   m   English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARLYN   f   English
Contracted variant of CAROLINE.
CARME (1)   f   Galician, Catalan
Galician and Catalan form of CARMEL.
CARME (2)   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καρμη (Karme), which was derived from κειρω (keiro) "to shear". This was the name of a Cretan goddess of the harvest.
CARMEL   f   English, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMELA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.
CARMELITA   f   Spanish
Spanish diminutive of CARMEL.
CARMELLA   f   English
Latinized form of CARMEL.
CARMELO   m   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMEN   f   Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CARMI   m   Biblical
Means "vine" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Reuben in the Old Testament.
CARMINA   f   Italian, Spanish
Variant of CARMEN.
CARMINE   m   Italian
Italian masculine form of CARMEN.
CARMO   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CARMEL.
CAROL (1)   f & m   English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CAROL (2)   m   Romanian
Romanian form of CAROLUS. This was the name of two Romanian kings.
CAROLA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLE   f   French
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIEN   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIN   f   German
German feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLYN   f   English
Variant of CAROLINE.
CARON   f & m   Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CARPUS   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latin form of the Greek name Καρπος (Karpos), which meant "fruit, profits". The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament in the second epistle of Timothy.
CARRAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of CORRAIDHÍN".
CARREEN   f   English (Rare)
Used by Margaret Mitchell in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936), where it is a combination of CAROLINE and IRENE.
CARRIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARROL   m   Irish
Variant of CARROLL.
CARROLL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CARRY   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARSON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish
Variant of KARSTEN.
CARTER   m   English
From an English surname which meant "one who uses a cart".
CÁRTHACH   m   Irish
Means "loving" in Irish. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CARVER   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "wood carver".
CARWYN   m   Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CARYL   f   English
Variant of CAROL (1).
CARYN   f   English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CARYS   f   Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.
CAS   m   Dutch
Short form of CASPER.
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CASH   m   English
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
CASIMIR   m   English, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CASIMIRO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of CASIMIR.
CASPAR   m   Judeo-Christian Legend
Latin variant of JASPER.
CASPER   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in a series of comic books.
CASPIAN   m   Literature
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
CASS   f & m   English
Short form of CASSANDRA, CASSIDY, and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSANDER   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσανδρος (Kassandros), the masculine form of CASSANDRA. This was the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Macedon.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CASSARAH   f   English (Rare)
Recently created name intended to mean "what will be, will be". It is from the title of the 1956 song 'Que Sera, Sera', which was taken from the Italian phrase che sarà sarà. The phrase que sera, sera is not grammatically correct in any Romance language.
CÁSSIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CASSIUS.
CASSIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CASSIAN   m   Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CASSIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was a derivative of CASSIUS.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CASSIE   f   English
Diminutive of CASSANDRA and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSIOPEIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιοπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιεπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CASSIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CASTOR   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CATAHECASSA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee warrior and chief of the 18th century.
CĂTĂLIN   m   Romanian
Romanian masculine form of KATHERINE.
CĂTĂLINA   f   Romanian
Romanian form of KATHERINE.
CATALINA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of KATHERINE.
CATARINA   f   Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CATE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KATE. A famous bearer is Australian actress Cate Blanchett (1975-).
CATELINE   f   Medieval French
Medieval French form of KATHERINE.
CATERINA   f   Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.
CATHAIR   m   Irish
Means "battle man" from Gaelic cath "battle" and vir "man".
CATHAL   m   Irish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CATHÁN   m   Irish
Derived from Gaelic cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CATHAOIR   m   Irish
Variant of CATHAIR.
CATHARINA   f   Dutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.
CATHARINE   f   English
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHASACH   m   Ancient Irish
Means "vigilant" in Irish.
CATHERIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHERINE   f   French, English
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CATHLEEN   f   Irish, English
Variant of KATHLEEN.
CATHRIN   f   German
German short form of KATHARINA.
CATHRINE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of KATHERINE.
CATHRYN   f   English
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHY   f   English
Diminutive of CATHERINE.
CÁTIA   f   Portuguese
Diminutive of CATARINA.
CATIA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of CATERINA.
CATINA   f   Romanian
Contracted form of CĂTĂLINA.
CATO (1)   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.
CATO (2)   f   Dutch
Diminutive of CATHARINA.
CATRIN   f   Welsh, German
Welsh form of KATHERINE, as well as a German short form of KATHARINA.
CATRINA   f   Irish, Scottish
Variant of CATRIONA.
CATRINE   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of KATRINE.
CATRIONA   f   Irish, Scottish
Gaelic form of KATHERINE.
CAVAN   m   English
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
CAYETANA   f   Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CAYETANO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CAYLEY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEE.
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CEALLACH   m   Irish
Irish name of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish ceallach "war, strife" or ceall "church".
CEALLACHÁN   m   Irish
Diminutive of CEALLACH.
CEALLAGH   m   Irish
Variant of CEALLACH.
CEARA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CIARA (2).
CEARBHALL   m   Irish
Probably from Gaelic cearbh "hacking with a weapon".
CEARRA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CIARA (2).
CEBRAİL   m   Turkish
Turkish form of GABRIEL.
CEBRIÁN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CECE   f   English
Diminutive of CECILIA or other names containing a similar sound.
CECELIA   f   English
Variant of CECILIA.
CECIL   m   English
From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CÉCILE   f   French, Dutch
French form of CECILIA.
CECÍLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of CECILIA.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CECÍLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of CECILIA.
CECILIE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Czech
Norwegian, Danish and Czech form of CECILIA.
CECILIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of CECILIA.
CECILIO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Caecilius (see CECILIA).
CECILY   f   English
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CECYLIA   f   Polish
Polish form of CECILIA.
CEDAR   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
ČEDOMIR   m   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic elements chedo meaning "child" and miru meaning "peace, world".
CÉDRIC   m   French
French form of CEDRIC.
CEDRIC   m   English
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).
CEEL   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of MARCELLUS.
CEES   m   Dutch
Variant of KEES.
CEFERINO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Zephyrinus (see ZEFERINO).
CEFIN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of KEVIN.
CÉIBHFHIONN   f   Irish Mythology
Means "fair locks" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of an Irish goddess of inspiration.
CEINWEN   f   Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements cain "lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
CELANDINE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CÉLESTE   f & m   French
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CELESTE   f & m   Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CÉLESTIN   m   French
French form of CAELESTINUS.
CELESTINA   f   Spanish, Italian
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CÉLESTINE   f   French
French feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CELESTINE   f & m   English
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CELESTINO   m   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of CAELESTINUS.
CELESTYN   m   Polish
Polish form of CAELESTINUS.
CELESTYNA   f   Polish
Polish feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CELIA.
CELIA   f   English, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.
ÇELİK   m   Turkish
Means "steel" in Turkish.
CELINA   f   Polish
Short form of MARCELINA.
CELINDA   f   English (Rare)
Probably a blend of CELIA and LINDA.
CÉLINE   f   French
French feminine form of CAELINUS. This name can also function as a short form of MARCELINE.
CELINO   m   Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Italian and Spanish form of CAELINUS or a short form of MARCELINO.
CÉLIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CAELIUS.
CELIO   m   Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Italian and Spanish form of CAELIUS.
CELSO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of CELSUS.
CELSUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "tall" in Latin. This was the name of a 2nd-century philosopher who wrote against Christianity. It was also borne by an early saint martyred with Nazarius in Milan.
CELYN   m   Welsh
Means "holly" in Welsh.
CEM   m   Turkish
Turkish form of JAM.
CEMAL   m   Turkish
Turkish form of JAMAL.
CEMİL   m   Turkish
Turkish form of JAMIL.
CEMİLE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of JAMIL.
CENEK   m   Czech
Diminutive of VINCENC.
CENGİZ   m   Turkish
Turkish form of GENGHIS.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENK   m   Turkish
Means "battle, war" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
CENNÉTIG   m   Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "armoured head" or "misshapen head". This was the name of an Irish king, the father of Brian Boru.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CEPHALUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κεφαλος (Kephalos), which was derived from κεφαλη (kephale) meaning "head". In Greek legend he remained faithful to his wife Procris even though he was pursued by the goddess Eos.
CEPHAS   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "rock" in Aramaic. The apostle Simon was called Cephas by Jesus because he was to be the rock upon which the Christian church was to be built. In most versions of the New Testament Cephas is translated into Greek Πετρος (Petros) (in English Peter).
CEPHEUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κηφευς (Kepheus), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek legend he was a king of Ethiopia, the husband of Cassiopeia. After he died he was made into a constellation and placed in the sky.
CERBERUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κερβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
CERDIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Earlier form of CEDRIC, possibly of Brythonic origin.
CEREN   f   Turkish
Means "young gazelle" in Turkish.
CERES   f   Roman Mythology
Derived from the Indo-European root *ker meaning "to grow". In Roman mythology Ceres was the goddess of agriculture, equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.
CERI (1)   m   Welsh
Possibly derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CERI (2)   f   Welsh
Short form of CERIDWEN.
CERIDWEN   f   Welsh
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CERISE   f   French
Means "cherry" in French.
CERNUNNOS   m   Celtic Mythology (Latinized)
Means "horned" in Celtic. This was the name of the Celtic god fertility, animals, wealth, and the underworld. He was usually depicted having antlers, and was identified with the Roman god Mercury.
CERRIDWEN   f   Welsh
Variant of CERIDWEN.
CERRIDWYN   f   Welsh
Variant of CERIDWEN.
CERYS   f   Welsh
Variant of CARYS.
CÉSAIRE   m   French
French form of CAESARIUS.
CÉSAR   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CESARE   m   Italian
Italian form of CAESAR.
CESÁRIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CAESARIUS.
CESARINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of CESARE.
CESARINO   m   Italian
Diminutive of CESARE.
CESÁRIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CAESARIUS.
CESC   m   Catalan
Short form of FRANCESC.
ÇETİN   m   Turkish
Means "harsh" in Turkish.
CEVAHİR   f & m   Turkish
Turkish form of JAWAHIR.
CEVDET   m   Turkish
Turkish form of JAWDAT.
CÉZAR   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese variant of CÉSAR.
CEZAR   m   Romanian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Romanian form of CAESAR, as well as a Brazilian Portuguese variant of CÉSAR.
CEZÁRIO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese variant of CESÁRIO.
CEZARY   m   Polish
Polish form of CAESAR.
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHAE-WON   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (chae) meaning "collect, gather, pluck" combined with (won) meaning "source, origin, beginning". Other hanja combinations are possible.
CHAGGIT   f   Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of HAGGITH.
CHAIM   m   Hebrew
Variant transcription of CHAYYIM.
CHALCHIUHTICUE   f   Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl. She was the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
CHALEB   m   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of CALEB used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
CHALICE   f   English (Rare)
Means simply "chalice, goblet" from the English word, derived from Latin calix.
CHAN   m & f   Khmer
Means "moon" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
CHANAH   f   Hebrew
Variant of CHANNAH.
CHANANYAH   m   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of HANANIAH.
CHANCE   m   English
Originally a diminutive of CHAUNCEY. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
CHAND   m   Indian, Hindi
Modern masculine form of CHANDA.
CHANDA   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fierce, hot, passionate" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form चण्ड and the feminine form चण्डा (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga).
CHANDAN   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali, Odia
Derived from Sanskrit चन्दन (chandana) meaning "sandalwood".
CHANDANA   f   Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Hindi
Feminine form of CHANDAN.
CHANDER   m   Indian, Hindi
Variant transcription of CHANDRA.
CHANDLER   m   English
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CHANDRA   m & f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANDRAKANT   m   Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHANDRAKANTA   f   Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of CHANDRAKANT.
CHANEL   f   English
From a French surname which meant "pipe". It has been used as an American given name since 1970s, influenced by the Chanel brand name (a line of women's clothing and perfume), which was named for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
CHANELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHANEL.
CHANG   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (chāng) meaning "flourish, prosper, good, sunlight" (which is usually only masculine), (chàng) meaning "smooth, free, unrestrained" or (cháng) meaning "long". Other Chinese characters are also possible.
CHANNAH   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of HANNAH.
CHANNARY   f   Khmer
Means "moon-faced girl" from Khmer ចន្ទ (chan) "moon" and នារី (neari) "woman, girl".
CHANNING   m & f   English (Modern)
From an English surname of uncertain origin.
CHANOKH   m   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ENOCH.
CHANTAL   f   French, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHANTÉ   f   English (Modern)
Means "sung" in French.
CHANTEL   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CHANTELLE   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CHANTREA   f   Khmer
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
CHAO   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (chāo) meaning "surpass, leap over" (which is usually only masculine), (cháo) meaning "tide, flow, damp", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CHARA   f   Greek
Means "happiness, joy" in Greek.
CHARALAMPOS   m   Greek
Means "to shine from happiness" from Greek χαρα (chara) "happiness" combined with λαμπω (lampo) "to shine".
CHARES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
CHARIOVALDA   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
CHARIS   f   Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARISMA   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χαρις (charis) "grace, kindness".
CHARISSA   f   English
Elaborated form of CHARIS. Edmund Spencer used it in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
CHARISSE   f   English
From a French surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in honour of American actress and dancer Cyd Charisse (1921-2008).
CHARITA   f   Various
Latinate form of CHARITY.
CHARITON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
CHARITY   f   English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHARLA   f   English
Feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLEEN   f   English
Variant of CHARLENE.
CHARLEMAGNE   m   History
From Old French Charles le Magne meaning "CHARLES the Great". This is the name by which the Frankish king Charles the Great (742-814) is commonly known.
CHARLENE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHARLINE   f   French
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLIZE   f   Southern African, Afrikaans
Feminine form of CHARLES using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.
CHARLOT   m   French
French diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLOTTA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of CHARLOTTE.
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHARLTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "settlement of free men" in Old English.
CHARMAINE   f   English
Meaning unknown, perhaps a combination of CHARMIAN or the English word charm with the aine suffix from LORRAINE. It was (first?) used for a character in the play 'What Price Glory' (1924), which was made into a popular movie in 1926.
CHARMIAN   f   English (Rare)
Form of CHARMION used by Shakespeare in his play 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).
CHARMION   f   Ancient Greek
Greek name derived from χαρμα (charma) meaning "delight". This was the name of one of Cleopatra's servants, as recorded by Plutarch.
CHARNA   f   Yiddish
From a Slavic word meaning "black".
CHARNETTE   f   English (Rare)
Probably an invented name.
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