Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is Ancient.
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ADALHEIDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ADELAIDE.
ADELA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
ADELAIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Shortened form of ADALHEIDIS.
ÆBBE   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EBBA (2).
ÆLFFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements ælf "elf" and flæd "beauty".
ÆLFGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
ÆLFSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
ÆLFÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFREDA.
ÆLFTHRYTH   f   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ælfþryð (see ELFREDA).
AELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AELIUS.
AELIANA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AELIANUS.
AEMILIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
AEMILIANA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
AENOR   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name of unknown meaning. This was the name of the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ÆÐELFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements æðel "noble" and flæd "beauty". Æðelflæd was a 10th-century queen of Mercia.
ÆÐELIND   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ETHELINDA.
ÆÐELÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength".
AGAPE   f   Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek αγαπη (agape) meaning "love". This name was borne by at least two early saints.
AGATHA   f   English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AGRIPPA   m & f   Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AGRIPPINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine derivative of AGRIPPA. This name was borne by the scheming mother of the Roman emperor Nero, who eventually had her killed. This was also the name of a 3rd-century Roman saint who is venerated in Sicily.
AIKATERINE   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of KATHERINE.
ALBA (2)   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBUS.
ALBA (3)   f   Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element alf meaning "elf".
ALBINA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALDA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of ALDO.
ALDEGUND   f   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and gund "war". Saint Algegund (or Aldegundis) was a 7th-century Frankish abbess.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALFHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ALFHILD.
ALIA (2)   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ELLA (1).
ALLOVERA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of ELVIRA.
ALODIA   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Possibly from a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements alja "other, foreign" and aud "riches, wealth". Saint Alodia was a 9th-century Spanish martyr with her sister Nunilo.
AMALASUINTHA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILLICENT.
AMALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMBROSIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMELINA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of EMMELINE.
ANASTASIA   f   Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANTHOUSA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of ANFISA.
ANTONINA   f   Italian, Polish, Russian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO).
APHRODISIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of APHRODISIOS.
APOLLONIA   f   Ancient Greek, Italian
Feminine form of APOLLONIOS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
AQUILA   m & f   Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
AQUILINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AQUILINUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Byblos.
ARISTOMACHE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements αριστος (aristos) "best" and μαχη (mache) "battle".
ARNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
ARTEMISIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ÁSA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese form of ÅSA.
ÁSDÍS   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and dís "goddess".
ÁSLAUG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ASLAUG.
ASPASIA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ασπασιος (aspasios) meaning "welcome, embrace". This was the name of the lover of Pericles.
ÁSTRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
AÐALBJÖRG   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and björg "help, save, rescue".
ATHANASIA   f   Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Athanasios (see ATHANASIUS).
ATHENAIS   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ATHENA.
AUDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Audo (see OTTO).
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURELIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AURELIANUS.
AUÐRHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of AUDHILD.
AVA (3)   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
AVEZA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of AVIS.
AVILA   f   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This name is also given in honour of the 16th-century mystic Saint Teresa of Ávila, Ávila being the name of the town in Spain where she was born.
BALBINA   f   Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of BALBINUS. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
BERENGARIA   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized feminine form of BERENGAR. This name was borne by a 13th-century queen of Castile.
BERENICE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty which was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BERENIKE   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Macedonian form of BERENICE.
BERGLJÓT   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BERGLJOT.
BERHTA   f   Ancient Germanic
Older form of BERTHA.
BERTHA   f   German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BJØRG.
BLANDINA   f   Ancient Roman
Latin form of BLANDINE.
BOADICEA   f   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of BOUDICCA.
BÓTHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BODIL.
BOUDICCA   f   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide.
BRUNIHILD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BRÜNHILD.
BRYNHILDR   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of BRÜNHILD. In the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga' Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
BRYNJA   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
CAECILIA   f   German, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELIUS.
CAELINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELINUS.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CASSIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CHARIS   f   Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARMION   f   Ancient Greek
Greek name derived from χαρμα (charma) meaning "delight". This was the name of one of Cleopatra's servants, as recorded by Plutarch.
CHLOE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHLOTICHILDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of CLOTILDE.
CHRYSANTHE   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLEOPATRA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κλεοπατρα (Kleopatra) which meant "glory of the father", derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" combined with πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος), This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606) is based on her.
CLOELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLOELIUS. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.
CLOTHILDIS   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic form of CLOTILDE.
CORINNA   f   English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CUNIGUND   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of KUNIGUNDE.
CYNEBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal fortress" from Old English cyne "royal" and burg "fortress". Saint Cyneburga, a daughter of a king of Mercia, was the founder of an abbey at Gloucester in the 7th century.
DAGMÆR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of DAGMAR.
DAGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGNY.
DAGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGRUN.
DECIMA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DECIMUS.
DEMETRIA   f   Ancient Greek, English
Feminine form of DEMETRIUS.
DEMOSTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "army of the people", derived from the Greek elements δημος (demos) "the people" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
DOMITIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DOMITIUS.
DOMITILLA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DRUSA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DRUSUS.
DRUSILLA   f   Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
EADBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".
EADGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDITH.
EALDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EDDA (2)   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Possibly from Old Norse meaning "great-grandmother". This was the name of two 13th-century Icelandic literary works: the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. This is also the name of a character in the Poetic Edda, though it is unclear if her name is connected to the name of the collection.
EIRENE   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of IRENE.
ELPIS   f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "hope" in Greek. In Greek mythology Elpis was the personification of hope. She was the last spirit to remain in the jar after Pandora unleashed the evils that were in it.
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EOFORHILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ERMENDRUD   f   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and thrud "strength".
ERMINGARD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of IRMINGARD.
ERMINHILT   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of IRMHILD.
ERMINLINDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERMELINDA.
EUANTHE   f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ευανθης (euanthes) meaning "blooming, flowery", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". According to some sources, this was the name of the mother of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUDOCIA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευδοκια (Eudokia), derived from the word ευδοκεω (eudokeo) meaning "to be well pleased, to be satisfied", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοκεω (dokeo) "to think, to imagine, to suppose".
EUDOKIA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of EUDOCIA.
EUDOXIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good repute, good judgement" from Greek ευδοξος (eudoxos), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοξα (doxa) "notion, reputation, honour, glory".
EUGENEIA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek feminine form of EUGENE.
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EULALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EUMELIA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευμελεια (eumeleia) meaning "melody".
EUNIKE   f   Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Greek form of EUNICE.
EUPHEMIA   f   Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUPHRASIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good cheer" in Greek.
EUPRAXIA   f   Ancient Greek
From a Greek word meaning "good conduct", derived from ευ (eu) "good" and πραξις (praxis) "action, exercise".
EUTHALIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word ευθαλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and θαλλω (thallo) "to blossom".
EUTHYMIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of EUTHYMIUS.
EUTROPIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Eutropios (see EUTROPIUS).
EUTYCHIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Eutychios (see EUTYCHIUS).
EYDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
FABIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FABIUS.
FABIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABIOLA   f   Italian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Diminutive of FABIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome.
FABRICIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fabricius (see FABRICE).
FAUSTA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FAUSTUS.
FAUSTINA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FEIDLIMID   m & f   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of three early kings of Munster.
FLAVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIANA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of FLAVIAN.
FLORIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Italian feminine form of FLORIAN.
FRIDA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
FRÍÐA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse cognate of FRIDA, also in part derived from Old Norse fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved".
FRIÐUSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of FRIDESWIDE.
FULVIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
GAIANA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γαιανη (Gaiane), a derivative of GAIA. This was the name of a (perhaps fictional) martyr who was killed in Armenia during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian in the late 3rd century.
GAIANE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of GAIANA.
GALENE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek feminine form of GALEN.
GERHILD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GERLIND   f   Ancient Germanic
Older form of GERLINDE.
GERMANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of GERMANUS.
GERTRUD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERTRUDE.
GISILA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GISELLE.
GLAUCIA   m & f   Ancient Roman
Latin form of GLÁUCIO.
GODELIVA   f   Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of GOTELEIB. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
GODGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of GODIVA.
GODIVA   f   Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GRATIANA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Gratianus (see GRATIAN).
GRÍMHILDR   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of KRIEMHILD. In the Norse 'Volsungasaga' Grímhildr is the mother of Gunnar and Gudrun, while in the later Germanic counterpart the 'Nibelungenlied' Kriemhild is the sister of Günther and she herself has a role equivalent to Gudrun.
GRIMHILT   f   Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Older Germanic form of KRIEMHILD.
GULLA   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GULL.
GUNDA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNNA   f   Danish, Ancient Scandinavian
Feminine form of GUNNE.
GUNNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GUNBORG.
GUNNHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GUNHILD.
GUNNVÖR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GUNVOR.
GUÐLAUG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
GUÐLEIF   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Feminine form of GUÐLEIFR.
GUÐRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements guð "god" and fríðr "beautiful".
GUÐRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of GUDRUN, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
GYÐA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of GYTHA.
HADEWIG   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HEDWIG.
HADRIANA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of HADRIANUS.
HAGNE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of AGNES.
HAILWIC   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HEILWIG.
HALLÞÓRA   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Feminine form of HALLÞÓRR.
HATSHEPSUT   f   Ancient Egyptian
Means "foremost of noble women" in Egyptian. This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.
HELENE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELEWIDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ELOISE.
HERAIS   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name which was probably derived from the name of the Greek goddess HERA.
HERLEVA   f   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly a derivative of hari "army", era "honour", or erla "noble" (or their Old Norse cognates). This was the name of the mother of William the Conqueror, who, according to tradition, was a commoner.
HERMINIA   f   Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of HERMINIUS.
HEROIDIAS   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HERODIAS.
HILARIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of HILARIUS.
HILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HILDA.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEGARD   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILDIGARDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILDEGARD.
HILDITRUT   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILTRUD.
HILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Old Norse cognate of HILDA. In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
HJÖRDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sword goddess", derived from Old Norse hjörr "sword" and dís "goddess".
HLÍF   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of LIV (1).
HORATIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of HORATIUS.
HORTENSIA   f   Ancient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name Hortensius, possibly derived from Latin hortus "garden".
HREIÐUNN   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of REIDUN.
HRODOHAIDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type" (see ROSE).
HROTSUITHA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSWITHA.
HYPATIA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘υπατος (hypatos) meaning "highest, supreme". Hypatia of Alexandria was a 5th-century philosopher and mathematician, daughter of the mathematician Theon.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
IMA   f   Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Variant of EMMA.
INGEBURG   f   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German variant of INGEBORG.
INGIBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of INGEBORG.
INGIGERÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of INGEGERD.
INGRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of INGRID.
IOVITA   m & f   Ancient Roman
Latin masculine and feminine form of JOVITA.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRMA   f   German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
ISHILD   f   Ancient Germanic (Hypothetical)
Germanic name, a hypothetical early form of ISOLDE.
ISIDORA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
IÐUNN   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Probably derived from Old Norse "again" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
IULIA   f   Romanian, Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman and Romanian form of JULIA.
IULIANA   f   Romanian, Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman and Romanian form of JULIANA.
IUNIA   f   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin form of JUNIA.
JÓRUNNR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of JORUNN.
JUDDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Probably derived from the name of the Germanic tribe the Jutes, who originated in Denmark and later invaded and settled in England. The name of the tribe, recorded in Latin as Iutae and Old English as Eotas, is of uncertain origin.
JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIANA   f   Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JUNIA   f   Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of JUNIUS. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament (there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman).
KALLISTO   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek καλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful", a derivative of καλος (kalos) "beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.
KALLISTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "beautiful army" from the Greek elements καλλος (kallos) "beauty" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
KASSANDRA   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, English (Modern)
Greek form of CASSANDRA, as well as a modern English variant.
KETILRIÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of KJELLFRID.
KLEOPATRA   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of CLEOPATRA.
KORINNA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of CORINNA.
LAELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.
LAURENTIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENTINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LAURENTINUS.
LEOFFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and flæd "beauty".
LEUTGARD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LUITGARD.
LIGEIA   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λιγυς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story 'Ligeia' (1838).
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINZA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LINDA.
LIVIA (1)   f   Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
LIVIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.
LONGINA   f   Polish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LONGINUS.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCILIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCILIUS.
LUCILLA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Latin diminutive of LUCIA. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome.
LUCRETIA   f   Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUIGSECH   f   Ancient Irish
Derived from the name of the Irish god LUGH.
LUITGARD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Leutgard which was derived from the elements leud "people" and gard "enclosure". This was the name of a 13th-century Flemish nun, the patron saint of easy deliveries.
LUTGARDIS   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name LUITGARD.
LYSANDRA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Lysandros (see LYSANDER).
LYSISTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
MAGNHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of MAGNHILD.
MAHTHILDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MATILDA.
MARCELLA   f   Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARCELLINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCELLINUS.
MARCIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCIUS. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
MARIANA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman
Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MAXIMA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MAXIMUS.
MAXIMILIANA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MAXIMILIANUS.
MELISSA   f   English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELITTA   f   Ancient Greek, German
Ancient Attic Greek variant of MELISSA.
MENODORA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μηνη (mene) "moon" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who was martyred with her sisters Metrodora and Nymphodora.
METRODORA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μητηρ (meter) "mother" (genitive μητρος) and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr who was killed with her sisters Menodora and Nymphodora.
MILDBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILBURGA.
MILDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
MILDÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILDRED.
MYRGJÖL   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of MUIRGEL.
MYRRINE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μυρρα (myrrha) meaning "myrrh".
NEFERTARI   f   Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian Nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
NEFERTITI   f   Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian Nfrt-jytj meaning "the beautiful one has come". Nefertiti was a powerful Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the principal wife of Akhenaton, the pharaoh that briefly imposed a monotheistic religion centered around the sun god Aton.
NIKE   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.
NIKEPHOROS   m & f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "carrying victory" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and φερω (phero) "to carry, to bear". This name was borne by several Byzantine emperors, including the 10th-century Nikephoros II Phokas. Besides being a masculine personal name, it was also a title borne by the goddess Athena.
NINO (2)   f   Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized), Georgian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the masculine name NINOS. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
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