Names Categorized "hamtaro characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include hamtaro characters.
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AIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other character combinations.
BIJOU   f   Various
Means "jewel" in French.
BO (2)   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "wave", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
BRANDY   f   English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
BUSTER   m   English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CURTIS   m   English
From an English surname which originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
DAISY   f   English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DEXTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
DYLAN   m   Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
EMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (e) meaning "favour, benefit" or (e) meaning "picture, painting" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FRANÇOISE   f   French
Feminine form of FRANÇOIS.
GOLDIE (1)   f   English
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HARMONY   f   English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HILLARY   f   English
Variant of HILARY. A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first man to climb Mount Everest.
IVY   f   English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
JACK   m   English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
JUNE   f   English
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KYLIE   f   English
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
MAGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MAXWELL   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
MIKA (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with (ka) meaning "fragrance" or (ka) meaning "increase". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
MIMI   f   English, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
NOEL   m   English
English form of NOËL.
OMAR (1)   m   Arabic, English
Variant transcription of UMAR. This is the usual English spelling of the 12th-century poet Umar Khayyam's name. In his honour it has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world, notably for the American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
PENELOPE   f   Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PHILLIP   m   English
Variant of PHILIP, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
ROBERTO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ROBERT. Saint Roberto Bellarmine was a 16th-century cardinal who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Another famous bearer was Roberto de Nobili, a Jesuit missionary to India in the 17th century.
ROSY   f   English
Diminutive of ROSE.
SANDY   m & f   English
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA. It can also be given in reference to the colour.
STAN (1)   m   English
Short form of STANLEY. A famous bearer was British comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965).
TRAVIS   m   English
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
WILLOW   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.
WOODY   m   English
Either a diminutive of WOODROW, or else from a nickname derived from the English word wood. A famous bearer is film director Woody Allen (1935-).
YAMATO   m   Japanese
From YAMATO, an ancient name for Japan. It can also refer to the Yamato period in Japanese history, which lasted into the 8th century. The individual kanji are meaning "great" and meaning "harmony".
YASU   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (yasu) meaning "peace, quiet", (yasu) meaning "peaceful" or (yasu) meaning "flat, smooth, level", as well as other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
YOSHI   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (yoshi) meaning "good luck", (yoshi) meaning "righteous", or (yoshi) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable", as well as other kanji with the same reading.
YUKI   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (yuki) meaning "happiness" or (yuki) meaning "snow". It can also come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause" combined with (ki) meaning "valuable" or (ki) meaning "chronicle". Other kanji or kanji combinations are also possible.
ZACK   m   English
Short form of ZACHARY.
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