Names Categorized "word names"

This is a list of names in which the categories include word names.
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ABBEY f English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ACACIA f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".
ACE (1) m English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
AFRICA (1) f African American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
AGE (1) m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
AI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
ALBINO m Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of ALBINUS.
ALPHA f & m English
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
AMARYLLIS f Literature
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem 'Eclogues'. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
AMBER f English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMETHYST f English (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AMITY f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
AMOR m & f Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
ANEMONE f English (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".
ANGEL m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANIMA (2) f English (Rare)
Means "soul, spirit" in Latin. In Jungian psychology the anima is an individual's true inner self, or soul.
ANISE f English (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
APRIL f English
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
ARCHER m English
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ARIA (1) f English (Modern)
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
ART m English
Short form of ARTHUR.
ASH m & f English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASIA (1) f English (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
ASK m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
ASPEN f English (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ATLAS m Greek Mythology
Possibly means "enduring" from Greek τλαω (tlao) meaning "to endure". In Greek mythology he was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
AUGUST m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS. This was the name of three Polish kings.
AURA f English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αυρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AUREOLE f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
AUTUMN f English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
AZALEA f English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".
AZUCENA f Spanish
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
AZURE f English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BAPTIST m German
German form of BAPTISTE. It is often paired with the name Johann, in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
BARB f English
Short form of BARBARA.
BASIL (1) m English
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BEAT m German (Swiss)
Swiss German form of BEATUS.
BEAU m English
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been occasionally used as an American given name since the late 19th century. It appears in Margaret Mitchell's novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) as the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.
BEE f English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BERRY (1) m English
Variant of BARRY.
BERRY (2) f English (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BERYL f English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BESTE f Turkish
Means "melody" in Turkish.
BETONY f English (Rare)
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BIDDY f Irish, English
Diminutive of BRIDGET.
BIFF m English (Rare)
From a nickname that was based on the English word biff, which means "punch, hit, strike".
BILL m English
Short form of WILLIAM. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name. Famous bearers include basketball player Bill Russell (1934-), comedian Bill Cosby (1937-), American president Bill Clinton (1946-), and Microsoft founder Bill Gates (1955-).
BIRDIE f English
Diminutive of BERTHA, BERNICE or other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
BISHOP m English
Either from the English occupational surname, or else directly from the English word. It is ultimately derived from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) "overseer".
BLANCH f English
Variant of BLANCHE.
BLAZE m English (Modern)
Modern variant of BLAISE influenced by the English word blaze.
BLOSSOM f English
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BOOKER m English
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
BRAN (1) m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAND m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANDY f English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
BRIAR m & f English (Modern)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRITANNIA f English (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BROOK m & f English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
BRYONY f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".
BUCK m English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUD m English
Short form of BUDDY.
BUDDY m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BUNNY f English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURGUNDY f English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BUSTER m English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust, a dialectal variant of burst. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
CADENCE f English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CALANTHE f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CALLA f English
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CAMELLIA f English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CANDY f English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CAPRICE f English
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
CARA f English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CAROL (1) f & m English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CARRY f English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARVER m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "wood carver".
CASH m English
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
CASSIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CAT f & m English
Diminutive of CATHERINE. It can also be a nickname from the English word for the animal.
CEDAR f & m English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
CELANDINE f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CELESTE f & m Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CHALICE f English (Rare)
Means simply "chalice, goblet" from the English word, derived from Latin calix.
CHANCE m English
Originally a diminutive of CHAUNCEY. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
CHARISMA f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χαρις (charis) "grace, kindness".
CHARITY f English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHASE m English
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
CHASTITY f English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the daughter of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
CHERIE f English
Derived from French chérie meaning "darling". In America, Cherie came into use shortly after the variant Sherry, and has not been as common.
CHERISH f English
From the English word meaning "to treasure".
CHERRY f English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CHINA f English (Modern)
From the name of the Asian country, ultimately derived from Qin, the name of a dynasty that ruled there in the 3rd century BC.
CHIP m English
Diminutive of CHARLES or CHRISTOPHER. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.
CHRISTIAN m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTMAS m & f English (Rare)
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
CHUCK m English
Diminutive of CHARLES. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-2017), one of the pioneers of rock music.
CLARITY f English (Rare)
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".
CLAY m English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLEMATIS f English (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλημα (klema) "twig, branch".
CLEMENCY f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CLEMENT m English
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLIFF m English
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLOVER f English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COLT m English
From the English word for a young male horse or from the surname of the same origin. It may be given in honour of the American industrialist Samuel Colt (1814-1862) or the firearms company that bears his name.
COLUMBINE f English (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
COMFORT f English (Rare)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation.
CONSTANT m French, Dutch, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CORAL f English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORD m German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
CORIANDER f English (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
COY m English
From a surname that meant "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CROCETTA f Italian
Diminutive of CROCIFISSA.
CROCIFISSA f Italian
Means "crucifix" in Italian.
CRYSTAL f English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
CURT m English
Either a variant of KURT or short form of CURTIS.
CYAN f & m English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
DAFFODIL f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAG m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Old Norse dagr meaning "day".
DAHLIA f English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY f English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DALE m & f English
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DAWN f English
From the English word dawn, ultimately derived from Old English dagung.
DEACON m English (Modern)
Either from the occupational surname Deacon or directly from the vocabulary word deacon, which refer to a cleric in the Christian church (ultimately from Greek διακονος (diakonos) meaning "servant").
DEAN m English
From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
DEFOREST m English
From a French surname meaning "from the forest". It was originally given in honour of American author John Deforest (1826-1906).
DELIGHT f English (Rare)
Means simply "delight, happiness" from the English word.
DELL m & f English
From an English surname that originally denoted a person who lived in a dell or valley.
DELTA f English
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.
DEN m English
Short form of DENNIS.
DERBY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of DARBY.
DESTINY f English
Means simply "destiny, fate" from the English word, ultimately from Latin destinare "to determine", a derivative of stare "to stand". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the last half of the 20th century.
DIAMOND f English (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DIANTHA f Dutch, English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
DICK (1) m English
Medieval diminutive of RICHARD. The change in the initial consonant is said to have been caused by the way the trilled Norman R was pronounced by the English.
DIRK m Dutch, German, English
Short form of DIEDERIK. The name was popularized in the English-speaking world by actor Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), who had some Dutch ancestry. This is also the Scots word for a type of dagger.
DOLLY f English
Diminutive of DOROTHY. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them. In modern times this name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of DOLORES.
DOT f English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOTTY f English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOV m Hebrew
Means "bear" in Hebrew.
DOVE f English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
DRAKE m English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
DREW m English
Short form of ANDREW.
DUKE m English
From the noble title duke, which was originally derived from Latin dux "leader".
DUSTY m & f English
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
DUTCH m English
From a nickname given to Americans of German descent. It is related to deutsch, the German word for "German".
DYE f Medieval English
Medieval short form of DIONYSIA.
EARL m English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
EARNEST m English
Variant of ERNEST influenced by the spelling of the English word earnest.
EASTER f English
From the English name of the Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus. It was ultimately named for the Germanic spring goddess Eostre. It was traditionally given to children born on Easter, though it is rare in modern times.
EBONY f English
From the English word ebony for the black wood that comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
ECHO f Greek Mythology
Means "echo" from the word for the repeating reflected sound, which derives from Greek ηχη (eche) "sound". In Greek mythology Echo was a nymph given a speech impediment by Hera, so that she could only repeat what others said. She fell in love with Narcissus, but her love was not returned, and she pined away until nothing remained of her except her voice.
EDDY m English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EGLANTINE f English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.
ELDER m Portuguese
Variant of HÉLDER.
ELLE f English (Modern)
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
EMBER f English (Modern)
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
EMERALD f English (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
ENDER m Turkish
Means "very rare" in Turkish.
EPIPHANY f English (Rare)
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) that commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
ERNEST m English, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).
ESPERANZA f Spanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
ESSENCE f English (Modern)
From the English word essence, which means either "odour, scent" or else "fundamental quality". Ultimately it derives from Latin esse "to be".
ESTRELLA f Spanish
Spanish form of STELLA (1), coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
EVE f English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
EVEN m Norwegian
Variant of ØYVIND.
FAITH f English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
FANCY f English (Rare)
From the English word fancy, which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαινω (phaino) "to show, to appear".
FANG f & m Chinese
From Chinese (fāng) meaning "fragrant, virtuous, beautiful" or other characters with a similar pronunciation.
FAWN f English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FEDORA f Russian
Russian form of THEODORA.
FELICIDAD f Spanish
Spanish form of FELICITAS. It also means "happiness" in Spanish.
FELICITY f English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FERN f English
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
FFION f Welsh
Means "foxglove" in Welsh.
FIFE m Scottish
From a Scottish place name that was formerly the name of a kingdom in Scotland. It is said to be named for the legendary Pictish hero Fib.
FLETCHER m English
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
FLICK f English
Diminutive of FELICITY.
FLIP m Dutch
Diminutive of FILIP.
FLOOR m & f Dutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE) or FLORA.
FLOWER f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FLURRY m Irish
Anglicized form of FLAITHRÍ.
FORD m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "ford" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
FOREST m English
Variant of FORREST, or else directly from the English word forest.
FORTUNE f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
FOSTER (1) m English
From an English surname that has several different origins: see FOSTER (1), FOSTER (2), FOSTER (3) and FOSTER (4).
FOX m English (Modern)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FRANK (1) m English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name that referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRITZ m German
German diminutive of FRIEDRICH.
GAGE m English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GAL (1) f & m Hebrew
Means "wave" in Hebrew.
GALE (1) f English
Variant of GAIL.
GALE (2) m English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
GALL m History
Form of GALLUS used to refer to the saint.
GARDEN f Basque
Means "transparent, clear" in Basque.
GARDENIA f English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GARLAND m English
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNET (1) f English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GAY f English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
GINGER f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GIOIA f Italian
Means "joy" in Italian.
GLORIA f English, Spanish, Italian, German
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.... [more]
GLORY f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
GORE m English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "triangular" (from Old English gara), originally referring to someone who lived on a triangular piece of land. A famous bearer is American writer Gore Vidal (1925-).
GRACE f English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GRANT m English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GRAY m & f English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREY m & f English (Modern)
Variant of GRAY.
GRIFFIN m English
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GUN f Swedish
Modern form of GUNNR.
GUNNER m English (Modern)
English variant of GUNNAR, influenced by the vocabulary word gunner.
GUY (1) m English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
HALCYON f Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as ALCYONE).
HALE (2) m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HALL m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English heall "manor, hall", originally belonging to a person who lived or worked in a manor.
HAM m Biblical
Means "hot, warm" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Ham is one of Noah's three sons, along with Shem and Japheth. He was the ancestor of the Egyptians and Canaanites.
HAPPY f & m English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARDMAN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTMANN.
HARDY m English
From a surname that was derived from Middle English hardi "brave, hardy".
HARM m Dutch
Dutch short form of HERMAN.
HARMONY f English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HARPER f & m English
From an Old English surname that originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARRY m English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HARSH m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Northern Indian form of HARSHA.
HAVEN f & m English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAZAN f Turkish
Means "autumn" in Turkish.
HAZE f English (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
HAZEL f English
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEATH m English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HEATHER f English
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers, which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
HEAVEN f English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HERB m English
Short form of HERBERT.
HERON m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HERSH m Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish הירש (see HIRSH).
HOLLY f English
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HONEY f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
HONOR f English (Rare)
Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.
HONOUR f English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
HOPE f English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
HUG m Catalan
Catalan form of HUGH.
HUNTER m & f English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
HYACINTH (2) f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see HYACINTHUS).
IBTISAM f Arabic
Means "smile" in Arabic.
INDIA f English
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
INDIGO f & m English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".
INNOCENT m History
From the Late Latin name Innocentius, which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.
ION (2) m Greek Mythology
Of unknown etymology, possibly pre-Greek. According to Greek mythology he was a son of Creusa and Xuthus (or alternatively the god Apollo). He was said to be the ancestor of the Greek tribe of the Ionians.
IRIS f Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IVORY m & f African American
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance that comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.
IVY f English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
JACINTH f English (Rare)
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
JADE f & m English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JAM m Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Yima meaning "twin" (related to Sanskrit Yama). This was the name of a mythological king, more commonly called Jamshid.
JARRED m English
Variant of JARED.
JASMINE f English, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen), which is also a Persian name.
JASPER m English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAVAN m Biblical
Means "Greece" in Hebrew, possibly related to ION (2). In the Old Testament this is the name of a grandson of Noah and the ancestor of the Greek peoples.
JAY (1) m English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JERK m Swedish
Old Swedish variant of ERIK.
JET f Dutch
Short form of HENRIËTTE or MARIËTTE.
JETT m English (Modern)
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
JEWEL f & m English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JOB m Biblical, Biblical French, Dutch
From the Hebrew name אִיּוֹב ('Iyyov), which means "persecuted, hated". In the Book of Job in the Old Testament he is a righteous man who is tested by God, enduring many tragedies and hardships while struggling to remain faithful.
JOCK m Scottish
Scottish form of JACK.
JOEY m & f English
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JONQUIL f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
JOURNEY f English (Modern)
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
JOY f English
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JULY f English (Rare)
From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.
JUNE f English
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
JUNIOR m English
From a nickname that was originally used for a boy who had the same name as his father.
JUNIPER f English (Modern)
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUSTICE m & f English
From an occupational surname meaning "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
KALINA f Bulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.
KARMA m & f Bhutanese
From the Sanskrit word कर्म (karma) meaning "action, deed, fate".
KESHET m & f Hebrew
Means "rainbow" in Hebrew.
KESTREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KIMIMELA f Native American, Sioux
Means "butterfly" in Lakota.
KING m English
From a nickname that derives from the English word king, ultimately from Old English cyning.
KIP m English
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
KIT m & f English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
KITTY f English
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
LACY f & m English
From a surname that was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name that was Latinized as Lascius.
LAKE m & f English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
LALA f Bulgarian
From a South Slavic word meaning "tulip". It is derived via Turkish from Persian لاله (laleh).
LANCE m English
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element landa meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
LANE m English
From a surname meaning "lane, path", which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
LARK f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAUREL f English
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAVENDER f English (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LAW m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LEGEND m English (Modern)
From the English word, referring to a story about the past (or by extension, a heroic character in such a story), ultimately from Latin legere "to read".
LIBERTY f English
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).
LILAC f English (Rare)
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILY f English
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINDEN m English
From a German surname that was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINNAEA f English (Rare)
From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see LINNÉA).
LINNET f English (Rare)
Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.