Feminine Names

gender
usage
Ghislaine f French
Feminine form of Ghislain.
Ghjulia f Corsican
Corsican form of Julia.
Ghjuvanna f Corsican
Corsican form of Iohanna (see Joanna).
Ghoncheh f Persian
Means "flower bud" in Persian.
Ghufran f & m Arabic
Means "forgiveness" in Arabic.
Gia f Italian (Rare)
Diminutive of Gianna.
Giacinta f Italian
Italian feminine form of Hyacinthus.
Giacoma f Italian
Feminine form of Giacomo.
Giacomina f Italian
Feminine form of Giacomo.
Giada f Italian
Italian form of Jade.
Giang f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (giang) meaning "river".
Gianna f Italian, Greek
Italian short form of Giovanna and a Modern Greek variant of Ioanna.
Giannina f Italian
Diminutive of Giovanna.
Giedrė f Lithuanian
Feminine form of Giedrius.
Gift m & f English (African)
From the English word gift, of Old Norse origin. This name is most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Gifty f English (African)
From the English word gift. This name is most common in Ghana in Africa.
Gigi 1 f French
French diminutive of Georgine or Virginie.
Giiwedinokwe f Indigenous American, Ojibwe
Means "woman of the north" in Ojibwe, derived from giiwedin "north" and ikwe "woman".
Gijsberta f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of Gisbert.
Gilah f Hebrew
Feminine form of Gil 3.
Gilberte f French
French feminine form of Gilbert.
Gilda f Italian, Portuguese
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
Gili f & m Hebrew
Means "my joy" in Hebrew.
Gill f English
Short form of Gillian.
Gillette f French
Feminine form of Gilles.
Gillian f English
Medieval English feminine form of Julian. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
Gina f Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of Georgina, Regina, Luigina and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of Virginia or Eugenia. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
Ginette f French
Diminutive of Geneviève.
Ginevra f Italian
Italian form of Guinevere. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
Ginger f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of Virginia, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
Ginka f Bulgarian
Diminutive of Gergina.
Ginnie f English
Diminutive of Virginia.
Ginny f English
Diminutive of Virginia.
Gintarė f Lithuanian
Feminine form of Gintaras.
Giò m & f Italian
Short form of Giovanni and other names beginning with Gio.
Gioconda f Italian
From the Late Latin name Iucunda, which meant "pleasant, delightful, happy". Leonardo da Vinci's painting the Mona Lisa is also known as La Gioconda because its subject is Lisa del Giocondo.
Gioia f Italian
Means "joy" in Italian.
Giorgia f Italian
Italian feminine form of George.
Giorgina f Italian
Diminutive of Giorgia.
Giosetta f Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Josette.
Giovanna f Italian
Italian form of Iohanna (see Joanna), making it the feminine form of Giovanni.
Gisa f German
German short form of Giselle.
Gisela f German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of Giselle.
Gisèle f French
French variant of Giselle.
Gisele f Portuguese
Portuguese (especially Brazil) form of Giselle. A famous bearer is Brazilian model Gisele Bündchen (1980-).
Gisella f Italian
Italian form of Giselle.
Giselle f French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet Giselle (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
Gisila f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Giselle.
Gita 1 f Indian, Hindi
Means "song" in Sanskrit. The word appears in the name of the Bhagavad Gita, a sacred text of Hinduism (meaning "divine song").
Gita 2 f Czech, Latvian
Czech and Latvian short form of Margita or Brigita.
Gitta f German, Hungarian
German short form of Brigitta and a Hungarian short form of Margit.
Gittan f Swedish
Swedish diminutive of Birgitta.
Gitte f Danish
Danish short form of Birgitte.
Gittel f Yiddish
From Yiddish גוט (gut) meaning "good".
Giuanna f Sardinian
Sardinian form of Iohanna (see Joanna).
Giuditta f Italian
Italian form of Judith.
Giulia f Italian
Italian feminine form of Julius.
Giuliana f Italian
Feminine form of Giuliano.
Giulietta f Italian
Diminutive of Giulia.
Giunone f Roman Mythology (Italianized)
Italian form of Iuno (see Juno).
Giuseppa f Italian
Feminine form of Giuseppe.
Giuseppina f Italian
Feminine form of Giuseppe.
Giusi f & m Italian
Short form of Giuseppa, Giuseppina or Giuseppe.
Giustina f Italian
Italian form of Iustina (see Justina).
Giusy f Italian
Variant of Giusi.
Gizella f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Giselle.
Gizem f Turkish
Means "mystery" in Turkish.
Gizi f Hungarian
Hungarian diminutive of Giselle.
Gladys f Welsh, English, French, Spanish
From the Old Welsh name Gwladus, probably derived from gwlad meaning "country". Alternatively, it may have been adopted as a Welsh form of Claudia. Saint Gwladus or Gwladys was the mother of Saint Cadoc. She was one of the daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel Puck (1870).
Glafira f Russian
Russian form of Glaphyra.
Glaphyra f Ancient Greek
From Greek γλαφυρός (glaphyros) meaning "polished, subtle".
Gláucia f Portuguese
Feminine form of Gláucio.
Glaucia m & f Ancient Roman
Latin form of Gláucio.
Glenda f English
Probably a feminine form of Glenn using the suffix da (from names such as Linda and Wanda). This name was not regularly used until the 20th century.
Glenice f Welsh
Anglicized form of Glenys.
Glenna f English
Feminine form of Glenn.
Glennis f Welsh
Anglicized form of Glenys.
Glenys f Welsh
Probably an elaboration of the Welsh word glân "pure, clean, holy" or glyn "valley". This name was created in the late 19th century.
Glika f Yiddish (Rare)
From Yiddish גליק (glik) meaning "luck".
Glinda f Literature
Created by author L. Frank Baum for his character Glinda the Good Witch, a kind sorceress in his Oz series of books beginning in 1900. It is not known what inspired the name.
Glória f Portuguese, Hungarian
Portuguese and Hungarian form of Gloria.
Gloria f English, Spanish, Italian, German
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.... [more]
Gloriana f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem The Faerie Queene (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
Glorinda f Esperanto
Means "worthy of glory" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin gloria.
Glory f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
Glukel f Yiddish (Rare)
Diminutive of Glika.
Glykeria f Greek, Late Greek
From Greek γλυκερός (glykeros) meaning "sweet". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Heraclea.
Glynis f Welsh
Variant of Glenys.
Gobnait f Irish
Feminine form of Gobán. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, the founder of a monastery at Ballyvourney.
Gobnat f Old Irish
Old Irish form of Gobnait.
Gobnet f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Gobnait.
Goda 1 m & f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element god meaning "good".
Goda 2 f Lithuanian
From Lithuanian godà meaning "thought, dream" or "honour, respect".
Godelieve f Flemish
Dutch (Flemish) form of Godeliva.
Godeliva f Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Goteleib. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
Godgifu f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Godiva.
Godiva f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
Gohar f & m Persian, Armenian, Urdu
From Persian گوهر (gohar) meaning "jewel, gemstone". This name is typically feminine in Iran and Armenia, but masculine in Pakistan.
Goizane f Basque
Derived from Basque goiz meaning "morning".
Goizargi f Basque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and argi "light".
Goizeder f Basque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and eder "beautiful".
Gökçe f Turkish
Means "blue" in Turkish.
Göksu m & f Turkish
From Turkish gök meaning "sky" and su meaning "water".
Gol f Persian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
Golbahar f Persian
Means "spring flower", from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and بهار (bahar) meaning "spring".
Golda f Yiddish
From Yiddish גאָלד (gold) meaning "gold". This is the name of Tevye's wife in the musical Fiddler on the Roof (1964). It was also borne by the Israeli prime minister Golda Meir (1898-1978).
Goldie 1 f English
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
Goldie 2 f Yiddish
Variant of Golda.
Golnar f Persian
Means "pomegranate flower", derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower" and نار (nar) meaning "pomegranate".
Gölnara f Tatar
Tatar form of Golnar.
Golnaz f Persian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and ناز (naz) meaning "delight, comfort".
Golshan f & m Persian
Means "rose garden" in Persian.
Golzar m & f Persian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and the suffix زار (zar) meaning "place abounding in, field, garden".
Gomer m & f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "complete" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a grandson of Noah and the unfaithful wife of the prophet Hosea.
Gonca f Turkish
Means "flower bud" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
Goneril f Literature
From Gonorilla, of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Gonorilla was the villainous eldest daughter of King Leir. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare used the spelling Goneril.
Gonorilla f Literature
Form of Goneril used by Geoffrey of Monmouth, who wrote in Latin.
Gönül f Turkish
Means "heart" in Turkish.
Gonxhe f Albanian
Means "flower bud" in Albanian, of Persian origin. This was the middle name of Saint Teresa of Calcutta, better known as Mother Teresa (1910-1997).
Goranka f Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of Goran.
Goretti f Various
From the surname of Maria Goretti, a 20th-century Italian saint who forgave her murderer on her deathbed. Her surname was derived from the given name Gregorio.
Gorica f Macedonian
Feminine form of Goran.
Gormlaith f Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "ruler, sovereign, princess". This was the name of several medieval Irish royals, including the wife of the 11th-century king Brian Boru.
Gosia f Polish
Diminutive of Małgorzata.
Göta f Swedish
Feminine form of Göte.
Gotzone f Basque
Feminine form of Gotzon.
Gouyen f Indigenous American, Apache
Variant spelling of Góyąń.
Gowri f Tamil, Indian, Kannada
South Indian form of Gauri.
Góyąń f Indigenous American, Apache
Means "wise" in Chiricahua Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century Apache warrior woman.
Gözde f Turkish
Means "favourite" in Turkish.
Graça f Portuguese
Means "grace" in Portuguese, making it a cognate of Grace.
Grace f English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.... [more]
Gracelyn f English (Modern)
Elaboration of Grace using the popular name suffix lyn.
Gracelynn f English (Modern)
Elaboration of Grace using the popular name suffix lyn.
Gracia f Spanish
Means "grace" in Spanish, making it a cognate of Grace.
Graciana f Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of Graciano.
Gracie f English
Diminutive of Grace.
Graciela f Spanish
Elaboration of Gracia.
Gracja f Polish
Polish form of Gracia.
Gráinne f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly derived from Old Irish grán meaning "grain" or gráin meaning "hatred, fear". In the Irish legend The Pursuit of Diarmaid and Gráinne she escaped from her arranged marriage to Fionn mac Cumhaill by fleeing with her lover Diarmaid. Another famous bearer was the powerful 16th-century Irish landowner and seafarer Gráinne Ní Mháille (known in English as Grace O'Malley), who was sometimes portrayed as a pirate queen in later tales.
Grania f Irish
Latinized form of Gráinne.
Granuaile f History
From Irish Gráinne Mhaol meaning "bald Gráinne". This was another name of Gráinne Ní Mháille, given in reference to her close-cropped hair as a young woman.
Gratia f Dutch (Rare)
Means "grace" in Latin.
Gratiana f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Gratianus (see Gratian).
Gray m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
Grazia f Italian
Means "grace" in Italian, making it a cognate of Grace.
Graziana f Italian
Italian feminine form of Gratianus (see Gratian).
Graziella f Italian
Diminutive of Grazia.
Gražina f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Grażyna.
Grażyna f Polish
From Lithuanian graži meaning "beautiful". This name was created by Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz for his poem Grażyna (1823).
Greer f & m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Gregor.
Greet f Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of Margaret.
Greetje f Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Margaret.
Gregoria f Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Gregorius (see Gregory).
Gréta f Hungarian, Icelandic
Short form of Margaréta (Hungarian) or Margrét (Icelandic).
Greta f German, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Polish, English
Short form of Margareta. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
Gretchen f German, English
German diminutive of Margareta.
Grete f German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of Margaret.
Gretel f German
Diminutive of Grete. It is well-known as a character from an 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch. The Grimm's story was based on earlier European folk tales.
Grethe f Danish, Norwegian
Short form of Margrethe.
Gretta f English
Variant of Greta.
Grey m & f English (Modern)
Variant of Gray.
Grid f Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Gríðr, probably derived from either gríð "zeal, vehemence" or grið "peace". In Norse myth she was a giantess (jǫtunn), the mother of Vidar by Odin. She aided Thor in his fight against the giant Geirrod.
Grier f & m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Gregor.
Griet f Dutch
Short form of Margriet.
Grímhildr f Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Kriemhild. In the Norse Völsungasaga Grímhildr is the mother of Gunnar and Gudrun, while in the Germanic counterpart the Nibelungenlied Kriemhild is the sister of Günther and she herself has a role equivalent to Gudrun.
Griselda f English, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval folklore, adapted into tales by Boccaccio (in The Decameron) and Chaucer (in The Canterbury Tales).
Grishma f Indian, Marathi
Means "summer" in Sanskrit.
Gríðr f Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Grid.
Grizel f Scots
Scots form of Griselda.
Gro f Norwegian
Norwegian form of Gróa.
Gróa f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse gróa meaning "to grow". This is the name of a seeress in Norse mythology.
Grozda f Bulgarian, Macedonian
Feminine form of Grozdan.
Grusha f Russian
Diminutive of Agrafena.
Gry f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Means "to dawn" in Norwegian, Danish and Swedish.
Guadalupe f & m Spanish
From a Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, meaning "Our Lady of Guadalupe". Guadalupe is a Spanish place name, the site of a famous convent, derived from Arabic وادي (wadi) meaning "valley, river" possibly combined with Latin lupus meaning "wolf". In the 16th century Our Lady of Guadalupe supposedly appeared in a vision to a native Mexican man, and she is now regarded as a patron saint of the Americas.
Guanting m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guān) meaning "cap, crown, headgear" combined with (tíng) meaning "court". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
Guanyu m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guān) meaning "cap, crown, headgear" combined with () meaning "house, eaves, universe". Other character combinations are possible.
Gudrun f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
Guendolen f Arthurian Romance
Variant of Gwendolen, used by Walter Scott in his poem The Bridal of Triermain (1813) for a queen who became the mother of Gyneth by King Arthur.
Guendoloena f Arthurian Romance
Latin form of Gwendolen used by Geoffrey of Monmouth for the wife of Merlin.
Gugulethu f Southern African, Xhosa, Zulu, Ndebele
From Xhosa, Zulu and Ndebele igugu "treasure, pride" and lethu "our".
Guinevere f Arthurian Romance
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sēbros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.... [more]
Guiomar f & m Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and mari "famous". In the medieval Lancelot-Grail Cycle he plays a minor role as a cousin of Guinevere, who banishes him after he becomes a lover of Morgan le Fey. In modern Portugal and Spain it is a feminine name.
Guiying m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guì) meaning "laurel, cassia, cinnamon" combined with (yīng) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed from other character combinations as well.
Gül f Turkish
Means "rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
Gul m & f Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
Gülay f Turkish
Means "rose moon" in Turkish, from Turkish gül, ultimately Persian گل (gol), meaning "rose" combined with ay meaning "moon".
Gulbadan f Urdu (Rare)
Means "having a body like a rose" in Persian. This was the name of a daughter of the Mughal emperor Babur.
Gülbahar f Turkish
Turkish form of Golbahar.
Gulbahar f & m Urdu
Urdu form of Golbahar.
Gülçin f Turkish
Means "rose picking, rose growing" in Turkish.
Gülden f Turkish
Means "from the rose" in Turkish.
Guli f Uzbek
Uzbek form of Gul.
Gulisa f Georgian
Means "of the heart" in Georgian, from გულის (gulis), the genitive of გული (guli) meaning "heart".
Gülistan f Turkish
Means "rose garden" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
Gulistan f Kurdish
Kurdish form of Gülistan.
Gülizar f Turkish
Turkish form of Golzar.
Gull f Swedish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
Gulla f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gull.
Gulmira f Kyrgyz, Kazakh
From Kyrgyz and Kazakh гүл (gul) meaning "flower", ultimately from Persian گل (gol), combined with Arabic أميرة (amira) meaning "princess".
Gülnar f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Golnar.
Gulnar f Kazakh
Kazakh form of Golnar.
Gülnarə f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Golnar.
Gulnara f Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian, Azerbaijani
Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Georgian form of Golnar, as well as a simplified Azerbaijani variant.
Gülnaz f Turkish
Turkish form of Golnaz.
Gulnaz f Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian, Urdu
Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian and Urdu form of Golnaz.
Gulnora f Uzbek
Uzbek form of Golnar.
Gülnur f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Gulrukh f Urdu
Means "rose faced" in Persian. This was the name of a wife of the Mughal emperor Babur.
Gülşen f Turkish
Turkish form of Golshan.
Gülten f Turkish
Means "rose skin" in Turkish.
Gulumbu f Indigenous Australian, Yolngu
Meaning unknown, of Yolngu origin.
Gulzar m & f Urdu
Urdu form of Golzar.
Gun f Swedish
Modern form of Gunnr.
Günay f & m Turkish, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements gün "sun" and ay "moon".
Gunborg f Swedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjǫrg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Gunda f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund meaning "war".
Gundula f German
Originally a diminutive of Gunda.
Günel f Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements gün "sun" and el "country, society".
Gunhild f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
Gunilla f Swedish
Swedish variant of Gunhild.
Gunn f Norwegian, Swedish
Modern form of Gunnr.
Gunna f Danish, Old Norse
Feminine form of Gunne.
Gunnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunborg.
Gunnel f Swedish
Swedish variant of Gunhild.
Gunnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunhild.
Gunnhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Gunhild.
Gunnr f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gunnr meaning "war". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Gunnvǫr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvor.
Gunnvor f Norwegian
Variant of Gunvor.
Gunvor f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvǫr meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vǫr "vigilant, cautious".
Guo m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guó) meaning "country" or other Chinese characters pronounced in a similar way.
Gurdeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Gurmeet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and मित्र (mitra) meaning "friend".
Guro f Norwegian
Norwegian diminutive of Gudrun.
Gurpreet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and प्रीति (priti) meaning "pleasure, joy, love".
Gurutze f Basque
Feminine form of Gurutz.
Gussie f English
Diminutive of Augusta.
Gusta f Dutch
Short form of Augusta.
Guðlaug f Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
Guðleif f Old Norse
Feminine form of Guðleifr.
Guðríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements guð "god" and fríðr "beautiful".
Guðríður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Guðríðr.
Guðrún f Old Norse, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Gudrun, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Guusje f Dutch
Feminine form of Guus.
Guwisti f Indigenous American, Cherokee
Derived from Cherokee ᎬᏫᏍᏓᏗ (gunwisdadi) meaning "sift, sieve".
Gwawr f Welsh
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
Gwen f Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of Gwendolen, Gwenllian and other names beginning with Gwen.
Gwenaëlle f French, Breton
Feminine form of Gwenaël.
Gwenda f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwenddydd f Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dydd meaning "day". In medieval Welsh tales this is the name of Myrddin's sister. Geoffrey of Monmouth calls her Ganieda and also makes her the wife of Rhydderch Hael.
Gwendolen f Welsh
Possibly means "white ring", derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This name appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th-century chronicles, written in the Latin form Guendoloena, where it belongs to an ancient queen of the Britons who defeats her ex-husband in battle. Geoffrey later used it in Vita Merlini for the wife of the prophet Merlin. An alternate theory claims that the name arose from a misreading of the masculine name Guendoleu by Geoffrey.... [more]
Gwendolyn f English
Variant of Gwendolen. This is the usual spelling in the United States.
Gweneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenfrewi f Welsh (Rare)
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with another element of uncertain meaning. It could possibly be Welsh ffreu meaning "stream, flow" or the obscure word ffrewi meaning "pacify, quell, reconcile". This may be the original form of Winifred. In any case, it is the Welsh name for the saint.
Gwenith f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth, influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
Gwenllian f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and possibly lliain meaning "flaxen, made of linen" or lliant meaning "flow, flood". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, notably by a 12th-century princess of Deheubarth who died in battle with the Normans. It was also borne by the 13th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last prince of Gwynedd.
Gwenn f Breton
Breton cognate of Gwen.
Gwenneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenyth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwladus f Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gladys.
Gwladys f Welsh
Variant of Gladys.
Gwynedd f & m Welsh
From the name of the kingdom of Gwynedd, which was located in northern Wales from the 5th century. It is now the name of a Welsh county. The name may be related to Old Irish Féni meaning "Irish people", itself possibly related to the Celtic root *wēnā meaning "band of warriors".
Gwyneira f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Gwyneth f Welsh, English
Probably a variant of Gwynedd. It has been common in Wales since the 19th century, perhaps after the Welsh novelist Gwyneth Vaughan (1852-1910), whose real name was Ann Harriet Hughes. A modern famous bearer is the American actress Gwyneth Paltrow (1972-).
Gyda f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Gyða (see Gytha).
Gyeong m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city", (gyeong) meaning "scenery, view", (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour", or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
Gyeong-Hui f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" and (hui) meaning "beauty". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Gyeong-Ja f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "congratulate, celebrate" or (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" combined with (ja) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other hanja character combinations as well. Korean feminine names ending with the character (a fashionable name suffix in Japan, read as -ko in Japanese) became less popular after Japanese rule of Korea ended in 1945.
Gyeong-Suk f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city" and (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Gyneth f Arthurian Romance
Perhaps a variant of Gwyneth, used by Walter Scott for the daughter of King Arthur and Guendolen in his poem The Bridal of Triermain (1813).
Gyöngyi f Hungarian
From Hungarian gyöngy meaning "pearl", of Turkic origin.
Gyöngyvér f Hungarian
Means "sister of pearl", from Hungarian gyöngy "pearl" and testvér "sibling". This name was created by the Hungarian poet János Arany for a character in his poem The Death of King Buda (1864).
Györgyi f Hungarian
Hungarian feminine form of George.
Györgyike f Hungarian
Diminutive of Györgyi.
Gypsy f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
Gyða f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Gytha.
Gytha f English (Archaic)
From Gyða, an Old Norse diminutive of Guðríðr. It was borne by a Danish noblewoman who married the English lord Godwin of Wessex in the 11th century. The name was used in England for a short time after that, and was revived in the 19th century.
f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese () meaning "river".