Feminine Names

gender
usage
Habiba f Arabic, Bengali
Feminine form of Habib.
Hacer f Turkish
Turkish form of Hagar.
Hadar f & m Hebrew
Means "splendour, glory" in Hebrew.
Hadas f Hebrew
Means "myrtle tree" in Hebrew.
Hadasa f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew הֲדַסָּה (see Hadassah).
Hadassah f Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
Hadewidis f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu meaning "battle, combat" and wid meaning "wide".
Hadewig f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Hedwig.
Hadewych f Dutch (Rare)
Dutch form of Hedwig.
Hadia f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هادية (see Hadiya).
Hadijah f Indonesian
Indonesian form of Khadija.
Hadil f Arabic
Means "cooing (of a pigeon)" in Arabic.
Hadiya f Arabic
Feminine form of Hadi.
Hadiye f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Hadi.
Hadiyya f Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
Hadizatu f Western African, Hausa
Hausa variant form of Khadija.
Hadley f & m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
Hadriana f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Hadrianus.
Hadya f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هادية (see Hadiya).
Hadyn m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Hayden.
Ha-Eun f Korean
From Sino-Korean (ha) meaning "summer, great, grand" combined with (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity". This name can also be formed by other hanja character combinations.
Haf f Welsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
Hafsa f Arabic
Means "gathering" in Arabic. This was the name of the daughter of Umar, the second caliph, and a wife of Muhammad.
Hafsah f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حفصة (see Hafsa).
Hafza f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حفصة (see Hafsa).
Hagar f Biblical, Biblical German, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "flight" in Hebrew, though it could also be of unknown Egyptian origin. In the Old Testament she is the second wife of Abraham and the mother of Ishmael, the founder of the Arab people. After Abraham's first wife Sarah finally gave birth to a child, she had Hagar and Ishmael expelled into the desert. However, God heard their crying and saved them.
Haggith f Biblical
Means "festive" in Hebrew, derived from the root חָגַג (chagag). In the Old Testament this is the name of one of King David's wives.
Hagir f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هاجر (see Hajar).
Hagit f Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of Haggith.
Hagne f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Agnes.
Hai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (hǎi) meaning "sea, ocean" or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Haidee f Literature
Perhaps intended to derive from Greek αἰδοῖος (aidoios) meaning "modest, reverent". This name was created by Lord Byron for a character (written as Haidée) in his 1819 poem Don Juan.
Haifa f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هيفاء (see Hayfa).
Hailey f English (Modern)
Variant of Hayley. This is currently the most common spelling in the United States, surpassing Haley in 2001 and attaining a high rank of 19th in 2010.
Hailwic f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Heilwig.
Haizea f Basque
Means "wind" in Basque.
Hajar f Arabic
Arabic form of Hagar.
Hajna f Hungarian
Shortened form of Hajnal. The Hungarian poet Mihály Vörösmarty used it in his epic poem Zalán Futása (1825).
Hajnal f Hungarian
Means "dawn" in Hungarian.
Hajnalka f Hungarian
Means "morning glory (flower)" in Hungarian.
Hajni f Hungarian
Diminutive of Hajnal or Hajnalka.
Hala f Arabic
Means "halo around the moon" in Arabic. This was the name of a sister-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad.
Halcyon f Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek ἀλκυών (from the same source as Alcyone).
Halcyone f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀλκυόνη (see Alcyone), via the misspelled variant Ἁλκυόνη (Halkyone). The spelling variation was due to a false association with ἅλς (hals) meaning "salt, sea".
Hale 1 f Turkish
Turkish form of Hala.
Haley f English (Modern)
Variant of Hayley. This spelling gained some popularity in the United States in 1977, possibly due to the author Alex Haley, whose book Roots was adapted into a popular miniseries that year. This was the most common American spelling from then to 2001, when it was eclipsed by Hailey.
Halide f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Khalid.
Halima f Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Western African, Eastern African, Hausa, Swahili
Alternate transcription of Arabic حليمة (see Halimah), as well as the usual form in several other languages.
Halimah f Arabic, Malay, Indonesian
Feminine form of Halim. Halimah was the name of the foster mother of the Prophet Muhammad.
Halimat f Western African, Hausa
Hausa variant of Halima.
Halimatu f Western African, Hausa
Hausa variant of Halima.
Halime f Turkish
Turkish form of Halimah.
Halina f Polish, Belarusian
Polish and Belarusian form of Galina.
Halinka f Polish
Diminutive of Halina.
Halkyone f Greek Mythology
Greek variant (or misspelling) of Halcyone.
Halldóra f Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of Haldor.
Halle 2 f English (Modern)
In the case of American actress Halle Berry (1966-), it is from the name of a department store in Cleveland where she was born (the store was founded by brothers bearing the German surname Halle, a cognate of Hall).
Hallel f & m Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew הָלַל (halal) meaning "praise". This is the name of a Jewish prayer, consisting of several psalms. The more traditional name Hillel, which is typically only masculine, is spelled the same but is vocalized with a different vowel.
Hallie f English
Diminutive of Harriet.
Hallþóra f Old Norse
Feminine form of Hallþórr.
Halyna f Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of Galina.
Hamida f Arabic, Bengali
Alternate transcription of Arabic حميدة (see Hamidah), as well as the usual Bengali transcription.
Hamidah f Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Feminine form of Hamid 1.
Hamide f Persian, Turkish
Persian and Turkish feminine form of Hamid 1.
Hamideh f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian حمیده (see Hamide).
Hana 1 f Arabic, Bosnian
Means "bliss, happiness" in Arabic.
Hana 2 f Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Sorbian
Form of Hannah in several languages.
Hana 3 f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) both meaning "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Hana 4 f Korean
Means "one" in Korean.
Hanaa f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هناء (see Hana 1).
Hanae f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana), which both mean "flower", combined with (e) meaning "picture" or (e) meaning "favour, benefit". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hanako f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
Hanan 2 f Arabic
Means "mercy, compassion" in Arabic.
Handan f Turkish
From Persian خندان (khandan) meaning "laughing, smiling".
Hande f Turkish
From Persian خنده (khandeh) meaning "laughter, smile".
Haneul m & f Korean
Means "heaven, sky" in Korean.
Hằng f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hằng) meaning "lady".
Hanga f Hungarian
Means "heather" in Hungarian.
Hania 1 f Polish
Polish diminutive of Hanna 1.
Hania 2 f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هنيّة (see Haniyya).
Hanifa f Arabic
Feminine form of Hanif.
Hanife f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Hanif.
Haniya f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هنيّة (see Haniyya).
Haniyah f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هنيّة (see Haniyya).
Haniyya f Arabic
Means "pleasant" in Arabic.
Hanke f Dutch (Rare)
Dutch diminutive of Johanna.
Hanna 1 f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Form of Channah (see Hannah) in several languages.
Hannah f English, Hebrew, German, Dutch, Arabic, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
Hanne 1 f & m Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of Johanne, or a German and Dutch short form of Johanna. This can also be a Dutch short form of Johannes (masculine).
Hannele f Finnish
Finnish diminutive of Johanna or Hannah.
Hannelore f German
Combination of Hanne 1 and Eleonore.
Hannie f Dutch
Diminutive of Johanna.
Haoua f Western African
Form of Hawa used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
Ha-o-zinne f Indigenous American, Apache
Means "standing up straight" in Apache. This was the name of a wife of the Chiricahua Apache chief Naiche.
Happy f & m English (Rare)
From the English word happy, derived from Middle English hap "chance, luck", of Old Norse origin.
Haregewoin f Eastern African, Amharic
Means "grape vine" in Amharic.
Harinder m & f Indian (Sikh)
Variant of Harendra used by Sikhs.
Haris 2 m & f Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Χάρης or Χάρις (see Charis).
Harley m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing". An American name for boys since the 19th century, it began to be used for girls after a character with the name began appearing on the soap opera Guiding Light in 1987.
Harlow f & m English
From an English surname derived from a place name, itself derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill". As a name for girls, it received some attention in 2008 when the American celebrity Nicole Richie used it for her daughter.
Harmonia f Greek Mythology
Means "harmony, agreement" in Greek. She was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, given by Zeus to Cadmus to be his wife.
Harmony f English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ἁρμονία (harmonia).
Harper f & m English
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who played or made harps (Old English hearpe). A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird. It rapidly gained popularity in the 2000s and 2010s, entering the American top ten for girls in 2015.
Harpreet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From the name of the Hindu god Hari and Sanskrit प्रीति (priti) meaning "pleasure, joy, love".
Harriet f English
English form of Henriette, and thus a feminine form of Harry. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. Famous bearers include the Americans Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, and the abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913).
Harriett f English
Variant of Harriet.
Harshada f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Feminine form of Harshad.
Hartley m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English heort "hart, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Haru m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Haruka f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
Haruko f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
Haruna 1 f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "spring" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hasna f Arabic
Means "beauty" in Arabic.
Hathor f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ḥwt-ḥrw (reconstructed as Hut-Heru) meaning "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian ḥwt "house" combined with the god Horus. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
Hatice f Turkish
Turkish form of Khadija.
Hatidža f Bosnian
Bosnian form of Khadija.
Hatshepsut f Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian ḥꜣt-špswt meaning "foremost of noble women". This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.
Hattie f English
Diminutive of Harriet.
Hatty f English
Diminutive of Harriet.
Haukea f Hawaiian
Means "white snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and kea "white".
Haunani f Hawaiian
Means "beautiful snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and nani "beauty, glory".
Haurvatat f Persian Mythology
Means "health, perfection, wholeness" in Avestan. This was the name of a Zoroastrian goddess (one of the Amesha Spenta) of health and water.
Hauwa f Western African, Hausa
Hausa form of Hawa.
Hava f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַוָּה (see Chava).
Haven f & m English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
Havva f Turkish
Turkish form of Eve.
Hawise f Medieval English
English form of a medieval French name appearing in various spellings such as Haueis or Haouys, which were derived from Hadewidis. The name was borne by a number of Norman and Anglo-Norman noblewomen from the 11th to 13th centuries.
Haya f Arabic
Means "hurry, come quickly" in Arabic.
Hayat f & m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "life" in Arabic, from حيي (hayiya) meaning "to live". In Arabic and Persian it is a feminine name, while in Urdu it is masculine.
Haydée f Spanish, French (Rare)
Spanish and French form of Haidee, from Lord Byron's Don Juan (1819). It was later used by Alexander Dumas for a character in The Count of Monte Cristo (1844).
Hayden m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill". Its popularity at the end of the 20th century was due to the sound it shared with other trendy names of the time, such as Braden and Aidan.
Hayfa f Arabic
Means "slender" in Arabic.
Hayley f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was brought to public attention as a given name, especially in the United Kingdom, by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-).... [more]
Ha-Yun f Korean
From Sino-Korean (ha) meaning "summer, name" combined with (yun) meaning "sunlight". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Hazal f Turkish
Means "dried leaf, fallen leaf" in Turkish.
Hazan f Turkish
Means "autumn" in Turkish.
Haze m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Hayes, sometimes used as a short form of Hazel.
Hazel f English
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century and quickly became popular, reaching the 18th place for girls in the United States by 1897. It fell out of fashion in the second half of the 20th century, but has since recovered.
He f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
Heather f English
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers, which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
Heaven f English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
Hebe f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἥβη (hebe) meaning "youth". In Greek mythology Hebe was the daughter of Zeus and Hera. She was a goddess of youth who acted as the cupbearer to the gods.
Hecate f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἑκάτη (Hekate), possibly derived from ἑκάς (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
Hecuba f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἑκάβη (Hekabe), which is of uncertain meaning. According to Greek mythology this was the name of the primary wife of King Priam of Troy. By him she was the mother of Hector, Paris, Cassandra and many others.
Hed m & f Hebrew
Means "echo" in Hebrew.
Hedda f Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of Hedvig. This is the name of the heroine of the play Hedda Gabler (1890) by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen.
Hédi 1 f Hungarian
Hungarian diminutive of Hedvig.
Hediye f Turkish
Turkish form of Hadiyya.
Hedvig f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish and Hungarian form of Hedwig.
Hedviga f Slovak
Slovak form of Hedwig.
Hedvika f Czech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of Hedwig.
Hedwig f German
From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.
Hedy f German, Dutch
Diminutive of Hedwig and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
Hefina f Welsh
Feminine form of Hefin.
Hege f Norwegian
Norwegian diminutive of Helga.
Heida f German
German diminutive of Adelheid.
Heide f German
German diminutive of Adelheid. It also coincides with the German word meaning "heath".
Heidemarie f German
Combination of Heide and Marie.
Heidi f German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of Adelheid. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel Heidi (1880) by the Swiss author Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
Heidrun f Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
Heike f & m Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of Henrike or Heinrich.
Heilwig f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
Heinrike f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Heinrich.
Heintje f Dutch
Feminine diminutive of Hendrik.
Heirani f Tahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and rani "heaven, sky".
Heiðrún f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Heidrun.
Heitiare f Tahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and tiare "flower".
Hekabe f Greek Mythology
Greek form of Hecuba.
Hekate f Greek Mythology
Greek form of Hecate.
Hekla f Icelandic
From the name of an active Icelandic volcano, derived from Old Norse hekla meaning "cloak".
Hel f Norse Mythology
In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Loki. She got her name from the underworld, also called Hel, where she ruled, which meant "to conceal, to cover" in Old Norse (related to the English word hell).
Helah f Biblical
Means "rust" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name is mentioned as one of the wives of Asher.
Heledd f Welsh
Meaning unknown. This is the narrator of the medieval poem Canu Heledd, which laments the loss of her family, including her brother Prince Cynddylan, and the destruction of the kingdom of Powys in the 7th century.
Heleen f Dutch
Dutch variant of Helen.
Heleena f Finnish
Finnish variant of Helena.
Heleentje f Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Helen.
Helen f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek Ἑλένη (Helene), probably from Greek ἑλένη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σελήνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
Heléna f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Helen.
Helēna f Latvian
Latvian form of Helen.
Hélène f French
French form of Helen.
Helene f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of Helen, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
Helenka f Czech, Polish
Czech and Polish diminutive of Helena.
Helewidis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Eloise.
Heli 2 f Finnish, Estonian
Diminutive of Helena. In Estonian this coincides with the word heli meaning "sound".
Hélia f Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of Helios.
Helka f Finnish
Finnish variant of Helga.
Hella f German, Danish
Diminutive of names beginning with Hel, such as Helga or Helena.
Hellä f Finnish
Means "gentle, tender" in Finnish.
Helle 1 f Danish, Norwegian, Estonian
Danish diminutive of names beginning with Hel, such as Helga or Helena.
Helle 2 f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Helle was the daughter of Athamus and Nephele. She and her brother Phrixus escaped sacrifice by fleeing on the back of a golden ram, but during their flight she fell off and drowned in the strait that connects the Aegean Sea with the Sea of Marmara, which was thereafter called the Hellespont ("the sea of Helle").
Hellen f English
Variant of Helen.
Helma f German, Dutch
Short form of Wilhelmina.
Helmi f Finnish, Swedish
Diminutive of Vilhelmiina or Vilhelmina. It also means "pearl" in Finnish.
Helmine f German
Short form of Wilhelmine.
Heloísa f Portuguese
Portuguese form of Eloise.
Héloïse f French
French form of Eloise.
Helve f Estonian
Means "flake, snowflake" in Estonian.
Helvi f Finnish
Finnish vernacular form of Hedvig.
Helvia f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Helvius.
Hema f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Kannada
Means "golden" in Sanskrit.
Hemera f Greek Mythology
Means "day" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified the daytime. According to Hesiod she was the daughter of Nyx, the personification of the night.
Henda f Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish variant of Hannah.
Hendel f Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish diminutive of Hannah.
Hendrika f Dutch
Feminine form of Hendrik.
Hendrikje f Dutch
Feminine form of Hendrik.
Hendrina f Dutch
Feminine form of Hendrik.
Hene f Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish variant of Hannah.
Heng m & f Chinese
From Chinese (héng) meaning "constant, persistent", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Henna f Finnish
Finnish feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Hennie m & f Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of Hendrik.
Henny f & m Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of Henriette, Hendrika and other names containing hen. In Dutch it can also be masculine as a diminutive of Hendrik.
Henrietta f English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish
Latinate form of Henriette. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
Henriëtte f Dutch
Dutch form of Henriette.
Henriette f French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of Henri.
Henriikka f Finnish
Finnish feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Henrika f Lithuanian, Swedish (Rare)
Lithuanian and Swedish feminine form of Henrik.
Henrike f German
German feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Henryka f Polish
Polish feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Henye f Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish variant of Hannah.
Hephzibah f Biblical
Means "my delight is in her" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the wife of King Hezekiah of Judah and the mother of Manasseh.
Hera f Greek Mythology
Uncertain meaning, possibly from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior"; ὥρα (hora) meaning "period of time"; or αἱρέω (haireo) meaning "to be chosen". In Greek mythology Hera was the queen of the gods, the sister and wife of Zeus. She presided over marriage and childbirth.
Herais f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name that was probably derived from the name of the Greek goddess Hera.
Herenui f Tahitian
From Tahitian here "loved, dear" and nui "big".
Herleva f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly from hari "army" or erlaz "noble" combined with leib "descendant, heir, heritage" (or Old Norse cognates). This was the name of the mother of William the Conqueror, who, according to tradition, was a commoner.
Hermia f Literature
Feminine form of Hermes. Shakespeare used this name in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
Hermine f German, French
Feminine form of Herman.
Hermínia f Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of Herminius.
Hermione f Greek Mythology
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god Hermes. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
Hero 1 f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing (1599).
Herodias f Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Feminine form of Herod. This was the name of a member of the Herodian ruling family of Judea, a sister of Herod Agrippa and the wife of Herod Antipas. She appears in the New Testament, where she contrives to have her husband Antipas imprison and execute John the Baptist.
Heroidias f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Herodias.
Hersilia f Roman Mythology
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Greek ἕρση (herse) meaning "dew". In Roman legend this was the name of a Sabine woman who became the wife of Romulus.
Herta f German
Variant of Hertha.
Hertha f German
Form of Nerthus. The spelling change from N to H resulted from a misreading of Tacitus's text.
Herut f Hebrew
Means "freedom" in Hebrew.
Hester f English, Dutch, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Esther. Like Esther, it has been used in England since the Protestant Reformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne used it for the heroine of his novel The Scarlet Letter (1850), Hester Prynne, a Puritan woman forced to wear a red letter A on her chest after giving birth to a child out of wedlock.
Hestia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἑστία (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
Heta f Finnish
Finnish vernacular form of Hedvig.
Hettie f English
Diminutive of Henrietta or Hester.
Heulwen f Welsh
Means "sunshine" in Welsh (a compound of haul "sun" and gwen "white, fair, blessed").
Hiba f Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
Hibiki m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hibiki) meaning "sound, echo".
Hibo f Eastern African, Somali
Somali form of Hiba.
Hifumi m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "one", (fu) meaning "two" and (mi) meaning "three".
Hikari f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
Hikaru m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
Hikmat m & f Arabic
Derived from Arabic حكمة (hikmah) meaning "wisdom".
Hila f Hebrew
Means "halo, aura" in Hebrew, from the root הָלַל (halal) meaning "to praise, to shine".
Hilal m & f Arabic, Turkish
Means "crescent moon" in Arabic, also referring to the new moon on the Islamic calendar. As a given name it is typically masculine in Arabic and feminine in Turkish.
Hilary f & m English
Medieval English form of Hilarius or Hilaria. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name. It was revived in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century as a predominantly feminine name. In America, this name and the variant Hillary seemed to drop in popularity after Hillary Clinton (1947-) became the first lady in 1993. Famous bearers include American actresses Hilary Swank (1974-) and Hilary Duff (1987-).
Hild f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Hilda.
Hilda f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Hungarian, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
Hilde f German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of Hilda.
Hildegard f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
Hildigardis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Hildegard.
Hilditrut f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Hiltrud.
Hildiwara f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Aldara.
Hildr f Old Norse, Norse Mythology
Old Norse cognate of Hilda. In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
Hildred f & m English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
Hildur f Icelandic, Norwegian
Icelandic form of Hildr.
Hilja f Finnish, Estonian
Means "silent, quiet" in Finnish and Estonian (a rare poetic word).
Hilla f Finnish
Short form of names beginning with Hil. It also means "cloudberry" in Finnish.
Hillary f English
Variant of Hilary. A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first man to climb Mount Everest. It is borne by the American politician Hillary Rodham Clinton (1947-). The name dropped in popularity in 1993 after she became the first lady as the wife of Bill Clinton.
Hillevi f Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish form of Heilwig.
Hilma f Finnish, Swedish
Possibly a variant of Helma or a feminine form of Hilmar.
Hiltraud f German
Variant of Hiltrud.
Hiltrud f German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
Hina f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hinata f & m Japanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written using the hiragana writing system.