Feminine Names

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BORGHILDUR f Icelandic
Icelandic form of BORGHILD.
BORNA m & f Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BORÓKA f Hungarian
Hungarian diminutive of BORBÁLA. It also means "juniper" in Hungarian.
BOSEDE f Western African, Yoruba
Means "born on Sunday" in Yoruba.
BOSMAT f Hebrew
Hebrew variant of BASEMATH.
BOTUM f Khmer
Means "lotus" in Khmer.
BOUDICCA f Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide. Her name is first recorded in Roman histories, as Boudicca by Tacitus and Βουδουῖκα (Boudouika) by Cassius Dio.
BOYANA f Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of BOJANA.
BOYKA f Bulgarian
Feminine form of BOYKO.
BOŽENA f Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BOŻENA f Polish
Polish cognate of BOŽENA.
BOZHENA f Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOŽENA.
BOZHIDARA f Bulgarian
Bulgarian feminine form of BOŽIDAR.
BOŽICA f Croatian
Diminutive of BOŽENA. It also means "goddess" in Croatian.
BOŽIDARKA f Serbian
Feminine form of BOŽIDAR.
BÖZSI f Hungarian
Diminutive of ERZSÉBET.
BRACHA f Hebrew
Means "blessing" in Hebrew.
BRADAMANTE f Literature
Used by Matteo Maria Boiardo for a female knight in his epic poem Orlando Innamorato (1483). He possibly intended it to derive from Italian brado "wild, untamed, natural" and amante "loving" or perhaps Latin amantis "lover, sweetheart, mistress", referring to her love for the Saracen Ruggiero. Bradamante also appears in Ludovico Ariosto's poem Orlando Furioso (1532) and Handel's opera Alcina (1735).
BRAELYN f English (Modern)
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.
BRAIDY m & f English (Rare)
Variant of BRADY.
BRANCA f Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BLANCHE.
BRANDA f English (Rare)
Perhaps a variant of BRANDY or a feminine form of BRAND.
BRANDE f English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDEE f English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDI f English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDIE f English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRÂNDUȘA f Romanian
Means "crocus" in Romanian.
BRANDY f English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
BRAŇKA f Slovak
Slovak diminutive of BRANISLAVA.
BRANKA f Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Feminine form of BRANKO.
BRANKICA f Croatian, Serbian
Feminine diminutive of BRANKO.
BRANWEN f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh brân "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRATISLAVA f Serbian
Feminine form of BRATISLAV. This is the name of the capital city of Slovakia, though it is unrelated.
BRAVA f Esperanto
Means "valiant, brave" in Esperanto.
BREANN f English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BREANNA f English
Variant of BRIANA.
BREANNE f English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRECHTJE f Dutch
Feminine form of BRECHT.
BREDA (1) f Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BREDA (2) f Slovene
Meaning unknown. It was used by the Slovene author Ivan Pregelj for the title character in his novel Mlada Breda (1913).
BREE f English
Anglicized form of BRÍGH. It can also be a short form of BRIANNA, GABRIELLA or other names containing bri.
BREESHEY f Manx
Manx form of BRIDGET.
BREINDEL f Yiddish (Rare)
Means "brunette" in Yiddish.
BRENDA f English
Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.
BRENNA f English
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.
BRETT m & f English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIA f English
Short form of BRIANNA, GABRIELLA or other names containing bri.
BRIALLEN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BRIANA f English
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA f English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANNE f English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRIAR m & f English (Modern)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRÍD f Irish
Modern form of BRIGHID.
BRIDE f Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BRIDGET f Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRIDIE f Irish
Anglicized diminutive of BRÍD.
BRIELLE f English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRÍGH f Irish
Derived from Irish brígh meaning "power, high".
BRIGID f Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish variant of Brighid (see BRIDGET).
BRÍGIDA f Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIDA f Italian
Italian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIT f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITA f Slovene, Croatian, Latvian, Czech, Slovak
Form of BRIDGET in several languages.
BRIGITTA f German, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTE f German, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BRINA f Slovene
Feminine form of BRIN.
BRINLEY f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was taken from the name of a town meaning "burned clearing" in Old English.
BRISEIDA f Literature
Form of BRISEIS used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
BRISEIS f Greek Mythology
Patronymic derived from Βρισεύς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
BRISTOL f English (Modern)
From the name of the city in southwest England that means "the site of the bridge".
BRIT f Norwegian
Norwegian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITANNIA f English (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITT f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTANY f English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons.... [more]
BROGAN m & f Irish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
BRON f Welsh
Short form of BRONWEN.
BRÓNACH f Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic brón meaning "sorrow". Saint Brónach was a 6th-century mystic from Ireland.
BRONAGH f Irish
Anglicized form of BRÓNACH.
BRONISLAVA f Czech, Slovak, Russian
Czech, Slovak and Russian feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISŁAWA f Polish
Feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONTE m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
BRONWEN f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BRONWYN f Welsh
Variant of BRONWEN.
BROOK m & f English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE f English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKLYN f & m English (Modern)
From the name of a borough of New York City, originally named after the Dutch town of Breukelen, itself meaning either "broken land" (from Dutch breuk) or "marsh land" (from Dutch broek). It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn. It is considered a feminine name in the United States, but is more common as a masculine name in the United Kingdom.
BRUNA f Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BRUNELLA f Italian
Feminine diminutive of BRUNO.
BRÜNHILD f German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the Valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
BRUNHILDA f History
Variant of BRÜNHILD, referring to the Frankish queen.
BRUNIHILD f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNILDA f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
BRYANNE f English (Rare)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRYGIDA f Polish
Polish form of BRIDGET.
BRYN m & f Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNHILDR f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of BRÜNHILD. In the Norse legend the Volsungasaga Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
BRYNHILDUR f Icelandic
Icelandic form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNJA f Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
BRYNLEE f English (Modern)
Combination of BRYN and the popular name suffix lee. It could also be considered a variant of BRINLEY.
BRYNN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYNNE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYONY f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρύω (bryo) meaning "to swell".
BUDUR f Arabic
Strictly feminine form of BADR.
BUFFY f English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH, from a child's pronunciation of the final syllable. It is now associated with the main character from the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003).
BUĞLEM f Turkish (Modern)
Meaning unknown.
BUHLE f & m Southern African, Xhosa, Ndebele
From Xhosa and Ndebele buhle "beautiful, handsome", from the root hle.
BULAN f Indonesian
Means "moon" (or "month") in Indonesian.
BUNNY f English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURÇİN f & m Turkish
Means "hind, doe" in Turkish.
BURCU f Turkish
Means "sweet smelling, fragrant" in Turkish.
BURGUNDY f English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BUSE f Turkish
Means "kiss" in Turkish, from Persian بوسه (buseh).
BUSHRA f Arabic, Urdu
Means "good news" in Arabic.
BUSINGE m & f Eastern African, Kiga
Means "peace" in Rukiga.
BÜŞRA f Turkish
Turkish form of BUSHRA.
CÄCILIA f German
German form of CECILIA.
CÄCILIE f German
German form of CECILIA.
CADENCE f English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CADERINA f Sardinian
Sardinian form of KATHERINE.
CADI f Welsh
Short form of CATRIN.
CAECILIA f German, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAELAN m & f English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAELIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELIUS.
CAELINA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELINUS.
CAESONIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAESONIUS. This name was borne by Milonia Caesonia, the last wife of the Roman emperor Caligula.
CAETANA f Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
ÇAĞLA f Turkish
Means "almonds" in Turkish.
ÇAĞRI f Turkish
Means "invitation" in Turkish.
CAHAYA m & f Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
CAHYA m & f Indonesian
Variant of CAHAYA.
CAHYO m & f Indonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of CAHAYA.
CAILIN f English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLYN. It also coincides with the Irish word cailín meaning "girl".
CAIRISTÌONA f Scottish
Scottish form of CHRISTINA.
CÁIT f Irish
Short form of CAITRÍONA.
CAITLÍN f Irish
Irish form of Cateline, the Old French form of KATHERINE.
CAITLIN f Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CAITRIA f Irish
Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA.
CAITRÍONA f Irish
Irish form of KATHERINE.
CAITRÌONA f Scottish
Scottish form of KATHERINE.
CAJA f Danish
Variant of KAJA (1).
CAJSA f Swedish
Variant of KAJSA.
CALANTHE f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
CALANTHIA f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALFURAY f Native American, Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
CALISTA f English, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALIXTA f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of CALIXTUS.
CALLA f English
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CALLIE f English
Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.
CALLIRRHOE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καλλιρρόη (Kallirrhoe), derived from the word καλλίρρους (kallirrhous) meaning "beautiful flowing". This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, including a daughter of Achelous. A small moon of Jupiter is named after her.
CALLISTO (2) f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
CALOGERA f Italian
Feminine form of CALOGERO.
CALPURNIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CALPURNIUS. This was the name of Julius Caesar's last wife.
CALYPSO f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Καλυψώ (Kalypso), which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλύπτω (kalypto) meaning "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CAM (1) f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
CAM (2) m & f English
Short form of CAMERON.
CAMBRIA f Various
Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.
CAMÉLIA f French
French form of CAMELLIA.
CAMELIA f Romanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIA f English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CAMERON m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILA f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA.
CAMILLA f English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
CAMILLE f & m French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAMMIE f English
Diminutive of CAMILLA.
CAMPBELL m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CANAN f Turkish
Means "sweetheart, beloved" in Turkish.
CANDACE f English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the hereditary title of the queens of Ethiopia, as mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It is apparently derived from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen mother". In some versions of the Bible it is spelled Kandake, reflecting the Greek spelling Κανδάκη. It was used as a given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 20th century by a character in the 1942 movie Meet the Stewarts.
CANDE f & m Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA or CANDELARIO.
CANDELA f Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELARIA f Spanish
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
CANDELAS f Spanish
Diminutive of CANDELARIA.
CANDI f English
Variant of CANDY.
CANDICE f English
Variant of CANDACE.
CÁNDIDA f Spanish
Spanish form of CANDIDA.
CÂNDIDA f Portuguese
Portuguese form of CANDIDA.
CANDIDA f Late Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play Candida (1898).
CANDIDE m & f French
French form of CANDIDUS or CANDIDA.
CANDIS f English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANDY f English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CANDYCE f English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANSU f Turkish
From Turkish can meaning "soul, life" and su meaning "water".
CAOILFHIONN f Irish
Derived from the Irish elements caol "slender" and fionn "fair". This was the name of several Irish saints.
CAOIMHE f Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CAPRICE f English
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
CAPRICIA f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CAPRICE.
CAPRINA f Various
From the name of the Italian island of Capri.
CAPUCINE f French
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARA f English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARAMIA f Various
From the Italian phrase cara mia meaning "my beloved".
CARDEA f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin cardo meaning "hinge, axis". This was the name of the Roman goddess of thresholds, door pivots, and change.
CAREN f English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CAREY m & f English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARI f English
Variant of CARRIE.
CARIDAD f Spanish
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.
CARIN f Swedish
Variant of KARIN.
CARINA (1) f English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARINE f French
French form of CARINA (1). It can also function as a short form of CATHERINE, via Swedish Karin.
CARISSA f English
Variant of CHARISSA.
CARITA f Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
CARLENE f English
Feminine diminutive of CARL.
CARLEY f English (Modern)
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLIE f English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLIJN f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of CAREL.
CARLISA f English (Rare)
Combination of CARLA and LISA.
CARLOTA f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLOTTE.
CARLOTTA f Italian
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CARLY f English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLYN f English
Contracted variant of CAROLINE.
CARME (1) f Galician, Catalan
Galician and Catalan form of CARMEL.
CARME (2) f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κάρμη (Karme), which was derived from κείρω (keiro) meaning "to shear". This was the name of a Cretan goddess of the harvest.
CARMEL f English, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMELA f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.
CARMELITA f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of CARMEL.
CARMELLA f English
Latinized form of CARMEL.
CARMEN f Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
CARMINHO f Portuguese
Diminutive of CARMO. It has been popularized in Portugal by the singer simply known as Carminho (1984-).
CARMO m & f Portuguese
Portuguese form of CARMEL.
CAROL (1) f & m English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CAROLA f Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLE f French
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIEN f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIN f German
German feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINA f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLYN f English
Variant of CAROLINE.
CARON f & m Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CARREEN f English (Rare)
Used by Margaret Mitchell in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936), where it is a combination of CAROLINE and IRENE.
CARRIE f English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARROL m & f English
Variant of CARROLL (masculine) or CAROL (1) (feminine).
CARRY f English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARSON m & f English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARY m & f English
Variant of CAREY. A famous bearer was the British-American actor Cary Grant (1904-1986).
CARYL f English
Variant of CAROL (1).
CARYN f English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CARYS f Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.
CASANDRA f Spanish, Romanian
Spanish and Romanian form of CASSANDRA.
CASEY m & f English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CASS f & m English
Short form of CASSANDRA, CASSIDY, and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSANDRA f English, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσάνδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κέκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CASSARAH f English (Rare)
Recently created name intended to mean "what will be, will be". It is from the title of the 1956 song Que Sera, Sera, which was taken from the Italian phrase che sarà sarà. The phrase que sera, sera is not grammatically correct in any Romance language.
CÁSSIA f Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CASSIUS.
CASSIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CASSIDY f & m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CASSIE f English
Diminutive of CASSANDRA and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSIOPEIA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιόπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιέπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CAT f & m English
Diminutive of CATHERINE. It can also be a nickname from the English word for the animal.
CĂTĂLINA f Romanian
Romanian form of KATHERINE.
CATALINA f Spanish, Corsican
Spanish and Corsican form of KATHERINE.
CATARINA f Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CATE f English (Rare)
Variant of KATE. A famous bearer is Australian actress Cate Blanchett (1969-).
CATELINE f Medieval French
Medieval French form of KATHERINE.
CATERINA f Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.
CATHARINA f Dutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.
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