Names Categorized "protection"

This is a list of names in which the categories include protection.
gender
usage
Adelma f Italian (Rare), Literature
Feminine form of Adelmo. This name was used by Carlo Gozzi for a character in his play Turandot (1762).
Adelmo m Italian
Italian form of Adhelm, also used to refer to the English saint Ealdhelm.
Adhelm m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements atha possibly meaning "father" and helm "helmet, protection".
Agmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Amund.
Amparo f Spanish
Means "protection, shelter, refuge" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Amparo, meaning "Our Lady of Refuge".
Amund m Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Agmundr, from the element egg "edge of a sword" or agi "awe, terror" combined with mundr "protection".
Andromeda f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with one of the related words μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of, to provide for" or μέδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
Ansehelm m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Anselm.
Anselm m German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
Antelmo m Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Anthelm.
Anthelm m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic element and meaning "wrath, zeal" combined with helm meaning "helmet, protection". Saint Anthelm was a 12th-century bishop of Belley in France.
Anthelme m French (Rare)
French form of Anthelm.
Åsmund m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ásmundr, cognate of Osmond.
Ásmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åsmund.
Ásmundur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Åsmund.
Belshazzar m Babylonian (Anglicized), Biblical
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sharra-usur meaning "Bel protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before the Persians conquered it in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
Bergljót f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Bergljot.
Bergljot f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
Branimir m Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
Branislav m Serbian, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Form of Bronisław in several languages.
Broen m Limburgish
Limburgish form of Bruno.
Bronislav m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of Bronisław.
Bronislava f Czech, Slovak, Russian
Czech, Slovak and Russian feminine form of Bronisław.
Bronisław m Polish
Derived from the Slavic elements borna "protection" and slava "glory". A famous Polish anthropologist, Bronisław Malinowski (1884-1942), has borne this name.
Bronisława f Polish
Feminine form of Bronisław.
Bronislovas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Bronisław.
Bruna f Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of Bruno.
Brunella f Italian
Feminine diminutive of Bruno.
Brünhild f German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
Brunhilda f History
Variant of Brünhild, referring to the Frankish queen.
Brunhilde f German
Newer German form of Brünhild.
Brunihild f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Brünhild.
Brunilda f Albanian, Spanish, Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Albanian, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Brünhild.
Bruno m German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition. A modern bearer is the American singer Bruno Mars (1985-), born Peter Gene Hernandez.
Brynhildr f Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Brünhild. In the Norse legend the Völsungasaga Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
Brynhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Brynhildr.
Brynja f Icelandic, Old Norse
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
Burkhard m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
Calypso f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Καλυψώ (Kalypso), which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλύπτω (kalypto) meaning "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
Cenhelm m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Kenelm.
Ceolmund m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
Chimalma f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "shield hand" in Nahuatl, derived from chīmalli "shield" and māitl "hand". This was the name of an Aztec goddess who was the mother of Quetzalcoatl and Xolotl.
Colbert m English
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman form of the Germanic name Colobert.
Colobert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements col, possibly meaning "helmet", and beraht meaning "bright".
Custódia f Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of Custodio.
Custodia f Spanish
Feminine form of Custodio.
Custódio m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Custodio.
Custodio m Spanish
Means "guardian" in Spanish, from Latin custodia "protection, safekeeping".
Cyneweard m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
Eadmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Edmund.
Eadweard m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Edward.
Ealdhelm m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and helm "helmet, protection". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint (commonly called Aldhelm).
Eamon m Irish
Variant of Éamonn.
Eastmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Esmond.
Edmé m French
Short form of Edmond.
Edmée f French
Feminine form of Edmé.
Edmond m French
French form of Edmund. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
Edmonda f Italian (Rare)
Italian feminine form of Edmund.
Edmonde f French
French feminine form of Edmund.
Edmondo m Italian
Italian form of Edmund.
Edmund m English, German, Polish
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
Edmundas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Edmund.
Edmundo m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Edmund.
Edmunds m Latvian
Latvian form of Edmund.
Edward m English, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman Conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
Elmo m Italian, English
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection". It is also a derivative of Erasmus, via the old Italian diminutive Ermo. Saint Elmo, also known as Saint Erasmus, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron of sailors. Saint Elmo's fire is said to be a sign of his protection.
Esmond m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
Eun-U m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" combined with (u) meaning "house, eaves, universe" or (u) meaning "divine intervention, protection". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Eun-Woo m & f Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 은우 (see Eun-U).
Ewart m English (Rare)
From an English and Scottish surname that was either based on a Norman form of Edward, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
Faramund m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and mund "protection". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century king of the Franks.
Florimond m Literature, French
Possibly from Latin florens meaning "prosperous, flourishing" combined with the Germanic element mund meaning "protection". This is the name of the prince in some versions of the fairy tale Sleeping Beauty.
Friduhelm m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Friedhelm.
Friedhelm m German
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and helm "helmet, protection".
Garnier m Medieval French
Medieval French form of Werner.
Germund m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and mund "protection".
Giselmund m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements gisil meaning "hostage, pledge" and mund meaning "protection".
Gopala m Hinduism
Means "cow protector" from Sanskrit गो (go) meaning "cow" and पाल (pala) meaning "guard, protector". This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna. This name was also borne by the 8th-century founder of the Pala Empire in Bengal.
Guarin m Medieval French
Norman French form of Warin.
Gudmund m Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Guðmundr, which was derived from the elements guð "god" and mundr "protection".
Guerino m Italian
Italian form of Warin.
Guglielmo m Italian
Italian form of William.
Guðmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gudmund.
Guðmundur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Gudmund.
Hammond m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from either the Germanic given name Haimund, which meant "home protection", or else the Old Norse given name Hámundr, which meant "high protection".
Helmo m Ancient Germanic
Germanic short form of names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection".
Helmold m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements helm "helmet" and wald "rule".
Hildegard f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
Hlíf f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Liv 1.
Hosea m Biblical
Variant English form of Hoshea, though the name is spelled the same in the Hebrew text. Hosea is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Hosea. Written in the northern kingdom, it draws parallels between his relationship with his unfaithful wife and the relationship between God and his people.
Hoshea m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name הוֹשֵׁעַ (Hoshe'a) meaning "salvation", from the root יָשַׁע (yasha'). In the Old Testament at Numbers 13:16, Moses gives the spy Hoshea the new name Yehoshu'a (see Joshua), which has a related origin. This name was also borne by an 8th-century BC king of Israel, who was the last ruler of that state before it was conquered by Assyria.
Hyeon-U m Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" or (hyeon) meaning "manifest, clear" combined with (u) meaning "divine intervention, protection" or (u) meaning "rain". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Hyun-Woo m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 현우 (see Hyeon-U).
Irnerius m History
Possibly from Wernerius, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Werner. This was the name of a 12th-century Italian scholar and jurist.
Ishmerai m Biblical
Means "he guards" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
Itzal m Basque
Means "shadow, protection" in Basque.
Kenelm m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
Kennard m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given names Cyneweard or Cyneheard.
Liv 1 f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".
Liva f Danish
Variant of Liv 1.
Live f Norwegian
Variant of Liv 1.
Miho 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (ho) meaning "grain" or (ho) meaning "protect, maintain". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Millard m English
From an occupational English surname meaning "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
Oddmund m Norwegian
Possibly a modern coinage based on the Old Norse elements oddr "point of a sword" and mundr "protection".
Olve m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ǫlvir, possibly derived from ala "all" or alu "defense, protection, luck" combined with vér "holy man" or "warrior".
Ölvir m Icelandic (Rare)
Icelandic form of Olve.
Ǫlvir m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Olve.
Osmond m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
Osmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Osmond.
Pharamond m Literature, French (Rare)
French form of Faramund used by Shakespeare in Henry V (1599).
Raimonda f Italian
Italian feminine form of Raymond.
Raimunde f German (Rare)
German feminine form of Raymond.
Ramóna f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Ramona.
Ramona f Spanish, Romanian, English
Feminine form of Ramón. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel Ramona (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.
Raymond m English, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
Raymonde f French
French feminine form of Raymond.
Réamonn m Irish
Irish form of Raymond.
Redmond m Irish
Anglicized form of Réamonn.
Redmund m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Réamann.
Rosamond f English
Variant of Rosamund, in use since the Middle Ages.
Rosamund f English (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
Rosemonde f French
French form of Rosamund.
Rosmunda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Rosamund.
Salman m Arabic
Means "safe", derived from Arabic سَلِمَ (salima) meaning "to be safe".
Salvius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name derived from Latin salvus meaning "safe". This was the family name of the short-lived Roman emperor Otho. It was also borne by several early saints.
Salvo m Italian
Variant of Salvio (see Salvius) or directly from Italian salvo meaning "safe".
Seward m English
From a surname that was itself derived from the Old English given name Sigeweard.
Shamira f Hebrew
Means "guardian, protector" in Hebrew.
Sharma m Indian, Hindi
Means "protection, comfort, joy" in Sanskrit.
Sharmila f Tamil, Indian, Marathi
Means "protection, comfort, joy" in Sanskrit.
Si-U m Korean
From Sino-Korean (si) meaning "begin, start" combined with (u) meaning "divine intervention, protection" or (u) meaning "rain". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
Si-Woo m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 시우 (see Si-U).
Þórbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's protection", from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Torborg f Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Swedish and Norwegian form of Þórbjǫrg.
Uilleag m Irish
Either an Irish form of the Old Norse name Hugleikr, or else a diminutive of Uilliam.
Ulick m Irish
Anglicized form of Uilleag.
Vahan m Armenian
Means "shield" in Armenian.
Veremund m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Germanic name, probably Waramunt, derived from war "vigilant, cautious" and mund "protection". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Galicia (from the Germanic tribe of the Suebi). It was later the name of kings of Asturias and León, though their names are usually spelled in the Spanish form Bermudo.
Verner m Danish, Swedish
Scandinavian form of Werner.
Vilhelmi m Finnish (Rare)
Finnish form of William.
Vilhelmiina f Finnish
Finnish feminine form of William.
Vilhelmina f Swedish (Rare), Lithuanian
Swedish and Lithuanian feminine form of William.
Vilhjálmur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of William.
Vishnu m Hinduism, Indian, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Marathi
Probably means "all-pervasive" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Vishnu is the protector and preserver of the universe, usually depicted as four-armed and blue-skinned. By some Hindus he is regarded as the supreme god.
Waramunt m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Veremund.
Ward 1 m English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
Warin m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element warin meaning "guard, protect".
Warinhari m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Werner.
Wazo m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wad meaning "to go" or warin meaning "guard, protect".
Werner m German, Dutch
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army". A famous bearer was the German physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976).
Wessel m Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive of Werner.
Wetzel m German (Rare)
Diminutive of Werner.
Wigmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wymond.
Wilhelm m German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of William. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
Wilhelmina f Dutch, German (Rare), English
Dutch and German feminine form of Wilhelm. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).
Wilhelmine f German
German feminine form of Wilhelm.
William m English
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". An early saint by this name was the 8th-century William of Gellone, a cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).... [more]
Wymond m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".