Names Categorized "rulers"

This is a list of names in which the categories include rulers.
gender
usage
Ælfric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "ruler".
Æðelric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "ruler". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
Æthelweald m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and weald "power, ruler".
Akbar m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Pashto, Indonesian, Indian (Muslim)
Means "greater, greatest" in Arabic. This was the name of a 16th-century Mughal ruler who expanded the empire to include most of India.
Alikhan m Kazakh
Combination of the name Ali 1 and the Turkic title khan, which means "ruler, leader".
Américo m Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of Amerigo.
Antipater m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Ἀντίπατρος (Antipatros), which meant "like the father" from Greek ἀντί (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and πατήρ (pater) meaning "father" (genitive πατρός). This was the name of an officer of Alexander the Great who became the regent of Macedon during Alexander's absence.
Athanaric m Ancient Germanic
From the Gothic name Athanareiks, derived from the Germanic element athana meaning "year" combined with ric meaning "ruler, mighty". Athanaric was a 4th-century ruler of the Visigoths.
Baishan m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "knife" in Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Tchihende Apache.
Baldarich m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Baldric.
Baldric m English (Archaic)
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and ric "ruler, mighty". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it was common in the Middle Ages.
Cahal m Irish
Anglicized form of Cathal.
Catahecassa m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee warrior and chief.
Cengiz m Turkish
Turkish form of Genghis.
Chingis m Mongolian
Mongolian form of Genghis.
Conall m Irish, Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "rule of a wolf", from Old Irish "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and fal "rule". This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
Connell m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill, a derivative of the given name Conall.
Cowessess m Indigenous American, Ojibwe (Anglicized)
From an Ojibwe or Cree name recorded as Kiwisance, said to mean "little child", possibly related to Ojibwe gwiiwizens meaning "boy" or Cree ᐊᐋᐧᓯᐢ (awâsis) meaning "child". This was the name of a late 19th-century chief of a mixed band of Plains Cree and Saulteaux people.
Dedrick m African American
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Diederik.
Derek m English
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of Theodoric. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.
Diederik m Dutch
Dutch form of Theodoric.
Eadwald m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weald "power, ruler". This was the name of an 8th-century king of East Anglia.
Edvaldo m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Possibly a Portuguese form of Eadwald.
Elric m Medieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names Ælfric or Æðelric. Both were rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
Emmerich m German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning "ruler". The first element may be ermen "whole, universal" (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal "work, labour" (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim "home" (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.
Emrik m Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of Emmerich.
Ermenrich m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and ric "ruler, mighty". Ermenrich (also often called Ermanaric) was a 4th-century Gothic king.
Ēvalds m Latvian
Latvian form of Ewald.
Ewald m German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name that was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
Ewoud m Dutch
Dutch form of Ewald.
Ewout m Dutch
Dutch form of Ewald.
Federica f Italian
Italian feminine form of Frederick.
Frederick m English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
Frederico m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Frederick.
Frédérique f French
French form of Frederica.
Friduric m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Frederick.
Fridwald m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Friedhold.
Friedhold m German (Rare)
Means "peaceful ruler", derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and wald "rule".
Genghis m History
From the title Genghis (or Chinggis) Khan, meaning "universal ruler", which was adopted by the Mongol Empire founder Temujin in the late 12th century. Remembered both for his military brilliance and his brutality towards civilians, he went on to conquer huge areas of Asia and Eastern Europe.
Godric m Anglo-Saxon
Means "god's ruler", derived from Old English god combined with ric "ruler, mighty". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman Conquest.
Gumarich m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements guma meaning "man" and ric meaning "ruler, mighty".
Harold m English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman Conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
Harriet f English
English form of Henriette, and thus a feminine form of Harry. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. Famous bearers include the Americans Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, and the abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913).
Harry m English
Medieval English form of Henry. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and names beginning with Har. Famous bearers include the American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972), who was named after his uncle Harrison, and the British royal Prince Harry (1984-), who is actually named Henry. It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
Hel f Norse Mythology
In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Loki. She got her name from the underworld, also called Hel, where she ruled, which meant "to conceal, to cover" in Old Norse (related to the English word hell).
Helmold m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements helm "helmet" and wald "rule".
Hendrina f Dutch
Feminine form of Hendrik.
Hendry m Scots
Scots form of Henry.
Henrietta f English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish
Latinate form of Henriette. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
Henriette f French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of Henri.
Hokolesqua m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "cornstalk" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief.
Hormizd m Persian Mythology, Ancient Persian
Middle Persian form of Ahura Mazda. This name was borne by several rulers of the Sasanian Empire. It was also borne by a Christian saint who was martyred in Persia in the 5th century.
Hrœrekr m Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Hroderich (see Roderick).
Iarlaithe m Old Irish
From an Old Irish element of unknown meaning combined with flaith "ruler, sovereign". Saint Iarlaithe was the founder of a monastery at Tuam in the 6th century.
Imrich m Slovak
Slovak form of Emmerich.
Imriška f Slovak
Slovak feminine form of Emmerich.
Ishani f Indian, Hindi
Means "ruling, possessing" in Sanskrit.
Jae-Seong m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jae) meaning "located at, exist" or (jae) meaning "kill, rule" combined with (seong) meaning "completed, finished, succeeded" or (seong) meaning "sincere, honest, true". Other hanja combinations are possible.
Jagadisha m Hinduism
Means "ruler of the world" from Sanskrit जगत् (jagat) meaning "world" and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
Jarlath m Irish
Anglicized form of Iarlaithe.
Kaneonuskatew m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
Means "he who walks on four claws" in Cree, derived from ᓀᐅᐧ (newo) "four" and the root ᐊᐢᑲᓯᕀ (askasiy) "claw". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan, also known as George Gordon.
Kawacatoose m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᑲᐋᐧᐦᑲᑐᐢ (Kawâhkatos) meaning "poor man, weak from hunger". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan.
Kendra f English
Feminine form of Ken 1 or Kendrick.
Kendrick m English
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of Henry".... [more]
Kentigern m History (Ecclesiastical)
From a Brythonic name in which the second element is Celtic *tigernos "lord, ruler". The first element may be *kentus "first" or * "dog, hound" (genitive *kunos). This was the name of a 6th-century saint from the Kingdom of Strathclyde. He is the patron saint of Glasgow.
Khubilai m Medieval Mongolian
Mongolian form of Kublai.
Kisecawchuck m Indigenous American, Cree (Anglicized)
From Cree ᑮᓯᑳᐊᐧᒑᕁ (Kîsikâawcâhk) meaning "day star", derived from ᑮᓯᑳᐤ (kîsikâw) "day" and ᐊᑖᕁ (atâhk) "star". This was the name of a 19th-century Plains Cree chief in Saskatchewan.
Kublai m History
From the Mongolian name Khubilai, of unknown meaning. This was the name of a 13th-century grandson of Genghis Khan (being the son of his son Tolui), and the fifth ruler of the Mongol Empire. He is also considered the first ruler of the Chinese Yuan dynasty.
Ladislao m Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of Vladislav.
Leofric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "ruler, mighty".
Lothair m History
English form of Lothar.
Louhi f Finnish Mythology
Variant of Loviatar. In Finnish mythology Louhi was another name of the death goddess Loviatar. She appears in the Finnish epic the Kalevala as a witch ruling the northern area known as Pohjola. She is the primary antagonist to the hero Väinämöinen.
Lycus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
Mahpiya m & f Indigenous American, Sioux
From Dakota or Lakota maȟpíya meaning "cloud, sky". This is the first part of the names of the Dakota chief Mahpiya Wicasta (1780-1863), known as Cloud Man, and the Lakota chiefs Mahpiya Luta (1822-1909), known as Red Cloud, and Mahpiya Iyapato (1838-1905), known as Touch the Clouds.
Maquinna m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
From Nuu-chah-nulth Mukwina, possibly meaning "possessor of pebbles". This was the name of a late 18th-century chief of the Mowachaht people.
Mictlantecuhtli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "lord of Mictlan" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the skeletal ruler of Mictlan, the realm of the dead, with his wife Mictecacihuatl.
Mircea m Romanian
Romanian form of Mirče. This name was borne by a 14th-century ruler of Wallachia.
Mojmír m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements moji meaning "my" and miru meaning "peace" or "world". This was the name of a 9th-century ruler of Moravia.
Mukesha m Hinduism
Means "ruler of Muka" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Shiva, given to him because he killed Muka, a demon in the form of a wild boar.
Muscowequan m Indigenous American, Ojibwe (Anglicized)
From Ojibwe Maskawigwan meaning "hard quill", derived from mashkawaa "hard" and gaaway "quill". This was the name of a 19th-century Saulteaux chief.
Naiche m Indigenous American, Apache
Means "mischief maker" in Apache. This name was borne by a 19th-century Chiricahua Apache chief, the son of Cochise.
Nonhelema f Indigenous American, Shawnee
Possibly means "not a man" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief, the sister of Hokolesqua.
Noriaki m Japanese
From Japanese (nori) meaning "law" or (nori) meaning "rule, ceremony" combined with (aki) meaning "bright, light, clear". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Norma f English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera Norma (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of Norman.
Odeserundiye m Indigenous American, Mohawk
Possibly means "lightning has struck" in Mohawk. This was the name of an 18th-century Mohawk chief, also called John Deseronto.
Órlaith f Irish, Old Irish
Means "golden ruler", from Old Irish ór "gold" combined with flaith "ruler, sovereign, princess". This name was borne by several medieval Irish royals, including a sister of the king Brian Boru.
Oswald m English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
Potsʉnakwahipʉ m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "male bison back" in Comanche, derived from potsʉ "male bison" and kwahi "back (body part)". This name was borne by a 19th-century war chief of the Penateka Comanche, also called Buffalo Hump.
Quanah m Indigenous American, Comanche (Anglicized)
From Comanche kwana meaning "fragrant, smelly". Quanah Parker (1845-1911) was a 19th-century chief of the Kwahadi Comanche.
Reginald m English
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of Reynold.
Reynold m English
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
Richard m English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave ruler", derived from the Germanic elements ric "ruler, mighty" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
Ricmod f & m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ric "ruler, mighty" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
Rigmor f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Scandinavian form of Ricmod.
Romuald m French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements hrom meaning "fame" and wald meaning "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century Italian saint who founded the Camaldolese order.
Romualda f Lithuanian, Polish
Feminine form of Romuald.
Ruarc m Irish
From Old Irish Ruarcc. It was possibly an early borrowing from the Old Norse name Hrœrekr. Alternatively it might be derived from Old Irish elements such as rúad "red" and arg "hero, champion". This was the name of a 9th-century king of Leinster.
Seraiah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "Yahweh is ruler" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament, including the father of Ezra.
Skenandoa m Indigenous American, Oneida (Anglicized)
Possibly from Oneida oskanutú meaning "deer". This was the name of an 18th-century Oneida chief. According to some sources the Shenandoah River in Virginia was named after him, though the river seems to have borne this name from before his birth. It is possible that he was named after the river, or that the similarity in spellings is a coincidence.
Svatopluk m Czech
Means "blessed people", derived from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and pulku "people, host, army". Svatopluk the Great was a 9th-century ruler of Great Moravia, a region centered around the modern Czech Republic and Slovakia.
Tatanka m Indigenous American, Sioux (Anglicized)
From Lakota tȟatȟáŋka meaning "male bison". This was the first part of the name of the Lakota holy man and chief Tatanka Iyotake (1831-1890), usually translated into English as Sitting Bull.
Tau m Southern African, Tswana, Sotho
Means "lion" in Tswana and Sotho. Tau was the name of the last ruler of the Rolong in South Africa (18th century).
Tessouat m Indigenous American, Algonquin
Meaning unknown. This was the name of several 17th-century Algonquin chiefs.
Theodoric m History
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
Theutrich m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Theodoric.
Þiudreiks m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Gothic) form of Theodoric.
Toal m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Túathal.
Tosahwi m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "white knife" in Comanche, derived from tosa- "white" and wihi "knife". This name was borne by a 19th-century Penateka Comanche chief.
Túathal m Old Irish
Means "ruler of the people", from Old Irish túath "people, country" and fal "rule". This was the name of a few Irish kings, including the legendary Túathal Techtmar.
Uhtric m Anglo-Saxon (Hypothetical)
Derived from the Old English elements uhta "pre-dawn" and ric "ruler, mighty".
Ulric m English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf ruler". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of Ulrich.
Valda f Latvian
Feminine form of Valdis.
Valdis m Latvian
Short form of Voldemārs and other Latvian names containing the Germanic/Baltic element wald "rule".
Valter m Italian, Swedish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Form of Walter used in several languages.
Vladana f Serbian, Czech
Feminine form of Vladan.
Vladislav m Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
Vlastimir m Serbian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and miru meaning "peace, world".
Vukašin m Serbian
Derived from Serbian vuk meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian ruler.
Wahunsenacawh m Indigenous American, Powhatan
Meaning unknown. This name was borne by a 17th-century chief of the Powhatan people. He was also known as Powhatan, as a result of confusion between his name and his birthplace.
Waldeburg f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Walburga.
Waldedrudis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Waltraud.
Waldo 2 m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". This was the name of an 8th-century abbot of Reichenau. It was also borne by the 12th-century French merchant Peter Waldo, who founded the religious order of the Waldensians.
Waldobert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint (called Valbert or Gaubert in French).
Waltraud f German
From the Germanic element wald "power, ruler" or walha "foreign" combined with thrud "strength".
Wapasha m Indigenous American, Sioux
Means "red leaf" in Dakota, from waȟpé "leaf" and šá "red". This was the name of several Dakota chiefs.
Wawatam m Indigenous American, Ojibwe
Possibly means "little goose" in Ojibwe. This was the name of an 18th-century chief of the Ottawa people.
Wickaninnish m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in Nuu-chah-nulth. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
Widald m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and wald "power, rule".
Witold m Polish
Polish form of Vytautas. Alternatively it could be derived from the Germanic name Widald.
Wob m Frisian
Frisian diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wald meaning "rule".
Wobbe m & f Frisian
Variant and feminine form of Wob.
Wubbe m Frisian, Dutch
Variant of Wob.
Wulfric m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Ulric.
Xerxes m History
Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha, which meant "ruler over heroes". This was a 5th-century BC king of Persia, the son of Darius the Great. He attempted an invasion of Greece, which ended unsuccessfully at the battle of Salamis.
Yijun m & f Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "joy, harmony" combined with (jūn) meaning "king, ruler". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
Ziemowit m Polish
From an old Slavic name derived from the elements sem "family" and vit "lord, master". This was the name of a legendary Piast prince of Poland. It was also borne by several other Piast rulers.
Zoilus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ζωΐλος (Zoilos), derived from ζωή (zoe) meaning "life". This name was borne by a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher known as a critic of Homer, and also by two Indo-Greek kings. Saint Zoilus was martyred at Córdoba, Spain during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.