Names Categorized "green"

This is a list of names in which the categories include green.
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ABILENEfEnglish
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament. It is probably from Hebrew אָבֵל ('avel) meaning "meadow, grassy area". It has occasionally been used as a given name in modern times.
ACACIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".
ÆSCmAnglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
AINA (3)fJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
ALLONmBiblical
Means "oak" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
ALON (1)mHebrew
Means "oak tree" in Hebrew.
ALONAfHebrew
Feminine form of ALON (1).
ALTWIDUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Derived from the Germanic elements ald "old" and witu "forest".
AMIR (2)mHebrew
Means "treetop" in Hebrew.
AMIRA (2)fHebrew
Feminine form of AMIR (2).
ANARGULfKazakh
Means "blooming pomegranate tree" in Kazakh.
AOIf & mJapanese
From Japanese (aoi) meaning "hollyhock, althea" or an adjectival form of (ao) meaning "green, blue". Other kanji with the same reading can form this name as well.
ARVIDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ASCELINmAncient Germanic
Derived from a diminutive of the Germanic element asc meaning "ash tree".
ASCOmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element asc meaning "ash tree".
ASHm & fEnglish
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEAfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEIGHfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLIEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLYNfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
ASHTONm & fEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASKmNorse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
ASKRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of ASK.
ASSEmFrisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element asc meaning "ash tree" or ans meaning "god".
ASWATHImIndian, Malayalam
From Sanskrit अशवत्थ (ashvattha) meaning "sacred fig tree".
AYLA (1)fHebrew
Variant transcription of ELAH.
ĄŽUOLASmLithuanian
Means "oak tree" in Lithuanian.
BAIm & fChinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
BASIL (1)mEnglish
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BAYARDmLiterature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
BENTLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BERYLfEnglish
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BÍCHfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bích) meaning "bluish green".
BJÖRKfIcelandic
Means "birch tree" in Icelandic.
BLERTAfAlbanian
Derived from Albanian blertë meaning "green".
BORmSlovene
Short form of names containing bor, such as BORISLAV or BORIS. It is also a South Slavic word meaning "pine tree".
BORÓKAfHungarian
Means "juniper" in Hungarian.
CEDARf & mEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
CELYNmWelsh
Means "holly" in Welsh.
CHALCHIUHTICUEfAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl. She was the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
CHESLEYmEnglish
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
CHLOEfEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHLOÉfFrench
French form of CHLOE.
CHLORISfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek χλωρος (chloros) meaning "pale green". Chloris, in Greek mythology, was a minor goddess of vegetation.
CLOEfSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of CHLOE.
CLOÉfPortuguese, French
Portuguese form and French variant of CHLOE.
CLOVERfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COCHISEmNative American, Apache
From Apache chis meaning "oak, wood". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
CORIANDERfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
CYANf & mEnglish (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
DAIKImJapanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "tree" or (ki) meaning "valuable". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
DALLASm & fEnglish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864).
DARA (1)mIrish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARACHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARAGHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARDANmAlbanian
From the name of the Dardani, an Illyrian tribe who lived on the Balkan Peninsula. Their name may derive from an Illyrian word meaning "pear". They were unrelated to the ancient people who were also called the Dardans who lived near Troy.
DARDANAfAlbanian
Feminine form of DARDAN.
DARRAGHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DEFORESTmEnglish
From a French surname meaning "from the forest". It was originally given in honour of American author John Deforest (1826-1906).
DEKELmHebrew
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew.
DELANOmEnglish
From a surname, recorded as de la Noye in French, indicating that the bearer was from a place called La Noue (ultimately Gaulish meaning "wetland, swamp"). It has been used in honour of American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), whose middle name came from his mother's maiden name.
DIKLAm & fHebrew
Variant transcription of DIKLAH.
DIKLAHm & fHebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "palm grove" in Hebrew or Aramaic. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Joktan. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name.
DOUBRAVKAfCzech
Czech feminine form of DUBRAVKO.
DUBRAVKAfCroatian, Serbian
Feminine form of DUBRAVKO.
DUBRAVKOmCroatian, Serbian
From the old Slavic word dubrava meaning "oak grove".
EBONYfEnglish
From the English word ebony for the black wood which comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
EGLĖfLithuanian
Means "spruce tree" in Lithuanian. In a Lithuanian legend Eglė was a young woman who married a sea snake.
ELAHf & mHebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "oak tree" or "terebinth tree" in Hebrew. This was the name of the fourth king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. He was murdered by Zimri, who succeeded him. In modern Hebrew this is typically a feminine name.
ELONmBiblical
Means "oak" in Hebrew. This was the name of one of the ruling judges of the Israelites according to the Old Testament.
ELOWENfCornish
Means "elm tree" in Cornish. This is a recently coined Cornish name.
ELWOODmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "elder tree forest" in Old English.
EMBLAfNorse Mythology, Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.
EMERALDfEnglish (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
EOGHANmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "born from the yew tree" in Irish, though it is possibly derived from EUGENE. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages.
EREZmHebrew
Means "cedar" in Hebrew.
ERWANmBreton
Breton form of IVO (1) or YVES.
ERWANNmBreton
Variant of ERWAN.
ESEmFrisian
Possibly a Frisian form of ANSO.
ESMERALDAfSpanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
EUANmScottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EVETTEfEnglish
Variant of YVETTE.
EVONNEfEnglish
Variant of YVONNE.
EWANmScottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EWENmScottish
Variant of EWAN.
FAIRUZfArabic
Variant transcription of FAYRUZ.
FAIRUZAfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FARLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "fern clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of this name is Canadian author Farley Mowat (1921-).
FAYRUZfArabic
Means "turquoise (the gemstone)" in Arabic, ultimately of Persian origin.
FERNfEnglish
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
FERNEfEnglish
Variant of FERN.
FERUZAfUzbek
Uzbek form of FIRUZEH.
FIROOZEHfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FIROUZEHfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FIROZmPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZ.
FİRUZƏfAzerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of FIRUZEH.
FIRUZAfTajik, Uzbek, Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani, Tajik, Uzbek and Azerbaijani form of FIRUZEH.
FİRUZEfTurkish
Turkish form of FIRUZEH.
FIRUZEHfPersian
Means "turquoise (the gemstone)" in Persian. Alternatively, it may be a feminine form of FIRUZ.
FORESTmEnglish
Variant of FORREST, or else directly from the English word forest.
FORRESTmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie 'Forrest Gump' (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
GARRICKmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GIADAfItalian
Italian form of JADE.
GINEVRAfItalian
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GRESHAMmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "grazing homestead" in Old English.
HAREGEWOINfEastern African, Amharic
Means "grape vine" in Amharic.
HARUNAfJapanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "spring" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HAZEfEnglish (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
HAZELfEnglish
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HIDEKImJapanese
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, outstanding" or (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" combined with (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HINAfJapanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HIROKImJapanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
HIROSHImJapanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations which are read the same way.
HOLLIEfEnglish
Variant of HOLLY.
HOLLISm & fEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
HOLLYfEnglish
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HUNTERm & fEnglish
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
ILANmHebrew
Means "tree" in Hebrew.
ILANAfHebrew
Feminine form of ILAN.
ILANITfHebrew
Feminine form of ILAN.
IRATIfBasque
Means "fern field" in Basque.
IRVINmEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRVINGmEnglish, Scottish, Jewish
From a Scottish surname which was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah. A famous bearer was the Russian-American songwriter and lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), whose birth name was Israel Beilin.
ITHAMARmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אִיתָמָר ('Itamar) meaning "date palm island". This is the name of a son of Aaron in the Old Testament.
ITSUKImJapanese
From Japanese (itsuki) meaning "tree", using the kanji's nanori reading. Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
IVA (1)fBulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Means "willow tree" in South Slavic.
IVA (3)fCzech
Feminine form of IVO (1).
IVESmHistory
English form of YVES, used to refer to Saint Ives (also called Ivo) of Huntingdonshire, a semi-legendary English bishop.
IVETfBulgarian
Bulgarian form of YVETTE.
IVETAfCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of YVETTE.
IVETTEfSpanish
Spanish form of YVETTE.
IVO (1)mGerman, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
IVONNEfSpanish, German, Dutch
Spanish, German and Dutch variant of YVONNE.
IWOmPolish
Polish form of IVO (1).
IWONAfPolish
Polish feminine form of YVON.
JADA (1)fEnglish
Possibly an elaborated form of JADE. This name came into general use in the 1960s, and was popularized in the 1990s by actress Jada Pinkett Smith (1971-).
JADEf & mEnglish, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JASMINEfEnglish, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JAVORmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "maple tree" in South Slavic.
JELAfSerbian, Croatian, Slovak
Short form of JELENA or JELISAVETA. It also means "fir tree" in Serbian and Croatian.
JELENAfSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JELKAfSlovene, Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of JELENA. It also means "fir tree" in Slovene.
JI-MINf & mKorean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JUNIPERfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUNÍPEROmVarious
This was the name assumed by the 18th-century Spanish Franciscan monk Miguel José Serra, a missionary to California. He named himself after one of Saint Francis's companions, who was named from Latin iuniperus "juniper".
KAEDEf & mJapanese
From Japanese (kaede) meaning "maple" or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
KAHURANGIf & mMaori
From the name of a type of green gemstone found in New Zealand, meaning "sky blue" in Maori.
KALINmBulgarian
Masculine form of KALINA.
KALINAfBulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.
KAZUKImJapanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
KEKOAmHawaiian
Means "the warrior" from Hawaiian ke, a definite article, and koa "warrior, koa tree".
KELLYm & fIrish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KEZIAfBiblical
Variant of KEZIAH.
KEZIAHfBiblical
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KIEFERmEnglish (Modern)
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
KIRIfMaori
Means "skin of a tree or fruit" in Maori. This name has been brought to public attention by New Zealand opera singer Kiri Te Kanawa (1944-).
KIZZIEfEnglish
Diminutive of KEZIAH.
KIZZYfEnglish
Diminutive of KEZIAH. This particular spelling was repopularized in the late 1970s by a character in the book and miniseries 'Roots'.
KOAmHawaiian
Means "warrior, koa tree" in Hawaiian.
LAURELfEnglish
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAVONNEfEnglish
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name YVONNE.
LAYTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement with a leek garden" in Old English.
LEGOLASmLiterature
Means "green leaves" in Sindarin, from laeg "green" combined with go-lass "collection of leaves". In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Legolas is the son of the elf lord Thranduil and a member of the Fellowship of the Ring.
LESmEnglish
Short form of LESLIE or LESTER.
LESLEYf & mEnglish
Variant of LESLIE.
LESLIEf & mEnglish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LESSIEfEnglish
Diminutive of names containing the sound les, such as LESLIE.
LI (1)f & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "reason, logic", () meaning "stand, establish", () meaning "black, dawn", () meaning "power, capability, influence" (which is usually only masculine) or () meaning "beautiful" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
LIMm & fChinese
Hokkien Chinese form of LIN.
LINm & fChinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest" or (lín) meaning "fine jade, gem". Other characters can also form this name.
LINA (1)fArabic
Means either "palm tree" or "tender" in Arabic.
LINDENmEnglish
From a German surname which was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINDONmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LYNDON.
LINFORDmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from place names meaning either "flax ford" or "linden tree ford" in Old English.
LINGf & mChinese
From Chinese (líng) meaning "spirit, soul", (líng) meaning "bell, chime", or other Chinese characters which are pronounced similarly.
LINTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
LINWOODmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LLINOSfWelsh
Means "linnet, finch" in Welsh. The linnet (species Linaria cannabina) is a small European bird in the finch family.
LYNDONmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
MADARAfLatvian
From the Latvian name for a type of flowering plant, known as cleavers or bedstraw in English.
MARJOLAINEfFrench
Means "marjoram" in French. Marjoram is a minty herb.
MARJOLEINfDutch
Dutch form of MARJOLAINE.
MARJOLIJNfDutch
Dutch form of MARJOLAINE.
MEADOWfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MELIAfGreek Mythology
Means "ash tree" in Greek, a derivative of μελι (meli) "honey". This was the name of a nymph in Greek myth, the daughter of the Greek god Okeanos.
MIDORIfJapanese
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which have the same pronunciation.
MINTTUfFinnish
Means "mint" in Finnish.
MORIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
MOSTYNmWelsh
From a Welsh place name which means "moss town" in Old English.
MUm & fChinese
From Chinese () meaning "admire, desire", () meaning "tree, wood", or other characters with similar pronunciations.
NANA (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and/or (na), a phonetic character. The characters can be in either order or the same character can be duplicated, as indicated by the symbol . Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also be used to form this name.
NANAKOfJapanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
NANAMIfJapanese
From Japanese (nana) meaning "seven" and (mi) meaning "sea". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
NAOKImJapanese
From Japanese (nao) meaning "straight" and (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of different kanji with the same pronunciations.
NASHmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015). The name was popularized in the 1990s by the television series 'Nash Bridges'.
NATSUKIfJapanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NATSUMIfJapanese
From Japanese (natsu) meaning "summer" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsumi) meaning "pick, pluck". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NGAIOfMaori
Maori name which is derived from the name of a type of tree, also called the mousehole tree. This name was borne by New Zealand crime writer Dame Ngaio Marsh (1895-1982).
NGỌCf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (ngọc) meaning "jade, precious stone, gem".
NOLLmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of OLIVER.
NTSUABfHmong
Means "green" in Hmong.
ODHARNAITfIrish
Means "little pale green one", derived from Irish odhra "pale green, sallow" combined with a diminutive suffix.
ODHRÁNmIrish
Means "little pale green one", derived from Irish odhra "pale green, sallow" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a saint who travelled with Saint Columba through Scotland.
ODRANmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OGDENmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "oak valley" in Old English. A famous bearer was the humourous American poet Ogden Nash (1902-1971).
OIHANAfBasque
Means "forest" in Basque.
OLImEnglish
Short form of OLIVER.
OLIVAfLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "olive". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Brescia.
OLIVEfEnglish, French
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVÉRmHungarian
Hungarian form of OLIVER.
OLIVERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIERmFrench, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OLIVIEROmItalian
Italian form of OLIVER.
OLIWERmPolish (Rare)
Polish form of OLIVER.
OLLIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
ORANmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
ORENmHebrew
Means "pine tree" in Hebrew.
ORNA (1)fIrish
Anglicized form of ODHARNAIT.
ORNA (2)fHebrew
Feminine form of OREN.
ORNATfIrish
Anglicized form of ODHARNAIT.
ORNELLAfItalian
Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel 'La Figlia di Jorio' (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".
ORRINmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OTARmGeorgian
Derived from Turkic otar meaning "pasture, meadow".
OWEN (2)mIrish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
PALLABmBengali
Bengali form of PALLAV.
PALLAVmIndian, Hindi
Means "budding leaf, shoot" in Sanskrit.
PALMERmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "pilgrim". It is ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PALMIROmItalian
Means "pilgrim" in Italian. In medieval times it denoted one who had been a pilgrim to Palestine. It is ultimately from the word palma meaning "palm tree", because of the custom of pilgrims to bring palm fronds home with them. The name is sometimes given to a child born on Palm Sunday.
PERRYmEnglish
From a surname which is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of HERRY". A famous bearer of the surname was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PHYLLISfGreek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
PIHLAfFinnish
Derived from Finnish pihlaja meaning "rowan tree".
PILOQUTINNGUAQfNative American, Greenlandic
Means "little leaf" in Greenlandic.
PINJAfFinnish
Means "stone pine" in Finnish.
QINGf & mChinese
From Chinese (qīng) meaning "blue, green, young", as well as other characters pronounced in a similar way.
RANDAfArabic
Means "scented tree" in Arabic.
RAYHANAfArabic
Means "basil" in Arabic. This was the name of a wife of the Prophet Muhammad.
REIfJapanese
From Japanese (rei) meaning "bell", (rei) meaning "beautiful, lovely" or (rei) meaning "the tinkling of jade". This name can also be formed by other kanji with the same pronunciation.
REYHANfTurkish, Uyghur
Turkish and Uyghur form of RAYHANA.
REYHANGULfUyghur
Uyghur elaboration of REYHAN using the suffix گۇل (gul) meaning "flower, rose".
RIADmArabic
Means "meadows, gardens", from the plural of Arabic روضة (rawdah).
RIAZmArabic
Variant transcription of RIAD.
RIHANNAfArabic
Variant transcription of RAYHANA.
RINA (4)fJapanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (na), a phonetic character, or (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
ROSEMARYfEnglish
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
SAGEf & mEnglish (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SELBYm & fEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SHELBYm & fEnglish
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
SHERWOODmEnglish
From an English place name (or from a surname which was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SILASmEnglish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SILOUANOSmBiblical Greek
Form of SILVANUS used in the Greek New Testament.
SILVANAfItalian
Italian feminine form of SILVANUS.
SILVANOmItalian
Italian form of SILVANUS.
SILVANUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVESTERmDutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVESTRmCzech
Czech form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTREmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTROmItalian
Italian form of SILVESTER.
SÍLVIAfPortuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of SILVIA.
SILVIAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SILVIEfCzech
Czech form of SILVIA.
SILVIUSmLate Roman, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SILVIYAfBulgarian
Bulgarian form of SILVIA.
SLYmEnglish
Short form of SYLVESTER. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a well-known bearer of this nickname.
SØLVIfNorwegian
Norwegian variant of SOLVEIG. It is also used as a short form of SILVIA.
SORRELfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".