Names Categorized "the loud house characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include the loud house characters.
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ALBERTmEnglish, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
BLAKEmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BOBBIEf & mEnglish
Variant of BOBBY. As a feminine name it can be a diminutive of ROBERTA or BARBARA.
BOBBYmEnglish
Diminutive of BOB. Hockey greats Bobby Hull (1939-) and Bobby Orr (1948-) have borne this name.
CARLOSmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLES.
CARLOTAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLOTTE.
CAROL (1)f & mEnglish
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CHADmEnglish
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHARLESmEnglish, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHAZmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CLIFFmEnglish
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLYDEmEnglish
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, which is of unknown origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858.
FRIDAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
HAROLDmEnglish
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HOWARDmEnglish
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
JORDANm & fEnglish, French, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
LALOmSpanish
Diminutive of EDUARDO.
LANAfEnglish, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LENIfGerman
German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA.
LIAMmIrish, English
Irish short form of WILLIAM.
LILYfEnglish
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINCOLNmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from the name of a city in England, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
LISAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LOLAfSpanish, English
Diminutive of DOLORES.
LORIfEnglish
Diminutive of LAURA or LORRAINE.
LUCYfEnglish
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LUNAfRoman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LYNNf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from Welsh llyn "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls. In some cases it may be thought of as a short form of LINDA or names that end in lyn or line.
MAGGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARIAf & mItalian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
PENELOPEfGreek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
POLLYfEnglish
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
RENEEfEnglish
English form of RENÉE.
RITAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROCKYmEnglish
Diminutive of ROCCO or other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie 'Rocky' (1976) and its five sequels.
RONNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
RUSTYmEnglish
From a nickname which was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
RUTH (1)fEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
SAM (1)m & fEnglish
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SERGIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SERGIUS.
STELLA (1)fEnglish, Italian, Dutch, German
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
TABBYfEnglish
Diminutive of TABITHA.
WALTmEnglish
Short form of WALTER.
WHITNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
ZACHmEnglish
Short form of ZACHARY.