Names Categorized "beloved"

This is a list of names in which the categories include beloved.
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AGAPETOS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of AGAPITO.
AGAPETUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Agapetos (see AGAPITO).
AGAPITO m Spanish, Italian
From the Late Latin name Agapitus or Agapetus, which was derived from the Greek name Αγαπητος (Agapetos) meaning "beloved". The name Agapetus was borne by two popes.
AHUVA f Hebrew
Means "beloved" in Hebrew.
AIMÉ m French
From Old French Amé, the masculine form of Amée (see AMY).
AIMÉE f French
French form of AMY.
AMADA f Spanish
Feminine form of AMADO.
AMADO m Spanish
Spanish form of AMATUS.
AMANDA f English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMANDUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Saint Amandus was a 5th-century bishop of Bordeaux. It was also borne by a 7th-century French saint who evangelized in Flanders.
AMATA f Late Roman
Feminine form of AMATUS.
AMATO m Italian
Italian form of AMATUS.
AMATUS m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "beloved". The 7th-century Saint Amatus was the first abbot of Remiremont Abbey.
AMÉ m Medieval French
Old French form of AIMÉ.
AMÉE f Medieval French
Old French form of AIMÉE.
AMI (2) f English
Variant of AMY.
AMIE f English
Variant of AMY.
AMY f English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ARMAS m Finnish
Means "beloved" in Finnish (an archaic poetic word).
ASTRID f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ASTRIDE f French
French variant of ASTRID.
ÁSTRÍÐR f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
ÁSTRÍÐUR f Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÁSTRÍÐR.
AYAULYM f Kazakh
Means "beloved" in Kazakh.
'AZIZ m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عزيز (see AZIZ).
AZIZ m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Uzbek
Means "powerful, respected, beloved", derived from Arabic عزّ ('azza) meaning "to be powerful" or "to be cherished". In Islamic tradition العزيز (al-'Aziz) is one of the 99 names of Allah. A notable bearer of the name was Al-'Aziz, a 10th-century Fatimid caliph.
AZİZE f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of AZIZ.
BRATUMIŁ m Polish (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and milu "gracious, dear".
CANAN f Turkish
Means "beloved" in Turkish.
CARA f English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARAMIA f Various
From the Italian phrase cara mia meaning "my beloved".
CARINA (1) f English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CHANDRAKANT m Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHARITY f English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DAFYDD m Welsh
Welsh form of DAVID. This name was borne by Dafydd ap Gruffydd, a 13th-century Welsh ruler, and Dafydd ap Gwilym, a 14th-century poet.
DÁIBHÍ m Irish
Irish form of DAVID.
DÀIBHIDH m Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of DAVID.
DAIVIDH m Scottish (Rare)
Gaelic variant of DAVID.
DALIMIL m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and milu meaning "gracious, dear".
DAUD m Indonesian, Arabic
Indonesian form of DAVID, and also an alternate transcription of Arabic داود (see DAWUD).
DAUID m Biblical Greek
Greek form of DAVID.
DAVETH m Cornish
Cornish form of DAVID.
DAVEY m English
Diminutive of DAVID.
DAVI m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of DAVID.
DÁVID m Hungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of DAVID.
DAVID m English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DAVIDA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of DAVID.
DAVIDE m Italian
Italian form of DAVID.
DAVIE m English, Scottish
Diminutive of DAVID.
DAVINA f English (British)
Feminine form of DAVID. It originated in Scotland.
DAVIS m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name DAVID. A famous bearer of the surname was Jefferson Davis (1808-1889), the only president of the Confederate States of America.
DAVIT m Georgian, Armenian
Georgian and Armenian form of DAVID.
DAVITI m Georgian
Georgian form of DAVID.
DAVUD m Persian
Persian form of DAVID.
DAW m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of DAVID.
DAWID m Polish, Biblical Hebrew
Polish form of DAVID, as well as the Biblical Hebrew form.
DAWOOD m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic داود (see DAWUD).
DAWUD m Arabic
Arabic form of DAVID.
DEWEY m Welsh
Welsh form of DAVID.
DEWI (1) m Welsh
From Dewydd, an old Welsh form of DAVID. Saint Dewi, the patron saint of Wales, was a 6th-century Welsh bishop.
DEWYDD m Welsh (Archaic)
Old Welsh form of DAVID.
DOVID m Yiddish
Yiddish form of DAVID.
DOVYDAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of DAVID.
DUDEL m Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of DAVID.
ELMO m English, German, Italian
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection". It is also a derivative of ERASMUS, via the old Italian diminutive Ermo. Saint Elmo, also known as Saint Erasmus, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron of sailors. Saint Elmo's fire is said to be a sign of his protection.
ERASMO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ERASMUS.
ERASMOS m Ancient Greek
Greek form of ERASMUS.
ERASMUS m Late Greek (Latinized)
Derived from Greek ερασμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.
ERASTUS m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Εραστος (Erastos) meaning "beloved". This was the name of an assistant of Paul mentioned in Acts and two epistles in the New Testament.
ERAZEM m Slovene
Slovene form of ERASMUS.
ERMO m Medieval Italian
Italian diminutive of ERASMUS.
ESMÉ m & f English (British)
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century. It is now more common as a feminine name.
EZIZ m Turkmen
Turkmen form of AZIZ.
FRIGE f Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of FRIGG.
FRIGG f Norse Mythology
Means "beloved" in Old Norse, ultimately derived from Indo-European *pri "to love". In Norse mythology she was the goddess of the earth, air and fertility, and the wife of Odin. Some scholars believe that she and the goddess Freya share a common origin.
FRÍÐA f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse cognate of FRIDA, also in part derived from Old Norse fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved".
GODELIEVE f Dutch
Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA.
GODELIVA f Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of GOTELEIB. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
GOTELEIB m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and leub "dear, beloved".
GÖZDE f Turkish
Means "favourite" in Turkish.
HABIB m Arabic
Means "beloved, darling" in Arabic.
HABIBA f Arabic
Feminine form of HABIB.
IDIDA f Biblical Latin
Form of JEDIDAH used in the Latin Old Testament.
IEDIDA f Biblical Greek
Form of JEDIDAH used in the Greek Old Testament.
JEDIDAH f Biblical
From Hebrew יָדִיד (yadid) meaning "beloved, friend". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of King Amon of Judah and the mother of Josiah.
JEDIDIAH m Biblical
Means "beloved of YAHWEH" in Hebrew, derived from יָדִיד (yadid) meaning "beloved, friend" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is a name given to Solomon by Nathan.
KAIPO m & f Hawaiian
Means "the sweetheart" from Hawaiian ka, a definite article, and ipo "sweetheart".
KANDA f Thai
Means "beloved" in Thai.
LEOBWIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements leub "dear, beloved" and win "friend", making it a cognate of LEOFWINE.
LEOFDÆG m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and flæd "beauty".
LEOFRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and sige "victory".
LEOFSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with stan "stone".
LEOFWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
LEWIN m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LIEVE f Dutch
Short form of GODELIEVE.
MARY f English, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
MILAN m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MIOMIR m Serbian
Derived from the element mio, a Serbian form of the Slavic element milu meaning "dear", combined with miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MOHANA m & f Hinduism
Means "bewitching, infatuating, charming" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form मोहन (an epithet of the Hindu gods Shiva, Krishna and Kama) and the feminine form मोहना.
MUDIWA f & m Southern African, Shona
Means "beloved" in Shona.
PHIL m English
Short form of PHILIP and various other names beginning with Phil, often a Greek element meaning "friend, dear, beloved".
PHILETUS m Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Greek name Φιλητος (Philetos) meaning "beloved". In the New Testament, Philetus is a heretic in the church at Ephesus.
PREDRAG m Serbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with a superlative prefix.
PRIYA f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali
Means "beloved" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a daughter of King Daksha.
RASTUS m English (Rare)
Short form of ERASTUS.
SHIVALI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "beloved of SHIVA (1)" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
SHRIVATSA m Indian, Hindi (Rare)
Means "beloved of Shri" from the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit वत्स (vatsa) meaning "beloved, dear". This is the name of a mark on Vishnu's chest.
TAAVET m Estonian
Estonian form of DAVID.
TAAVETTI m Finnish
Finnish form of DAVID.
TAAVI m Estonian, Finnish
Estonian and Finnish form of DAVID.
TAFFY m Welsh
Anglicized form of DAFYDD. It has been used a slang term for a Welshman.