Names Categorized "rare English"

This is a list of names in which the categories include rare English.
gender
usage
Aaren m & f English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of Aaron.
Acacia f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately derived from Greek ἀκή (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
Adair m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Edgar.
Adamina f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Adam.
Adena f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Adina 1.
Africa 1 f African American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
Alanis f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Alan. Canadian musician Alanis Morissette (1974-) was named after her father Alan. Her parents apparently decided to use this particular spelling after seeing this word in a Greek newspaper.
Aldous m English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
Alexandrina f Portuguese, English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Alexandra. This was the first name of Queen Victoria; her middle name was Victoria.
Algar m English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Alita f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Alethea.
Alphonzo m English (Rare)
Uncommon variant of Alfonso.
Alyx f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of Alex.
Amabel f English (Rare)
Medieval feminine form of Amabilis.
Amberlynn f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Amber using the popular name suffix lyn.
Amery m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Emery.
Amethyst f English (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
Amice f Medieval English
Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning "friend". This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon.
Amilia f English (Rare)
Variant of either Amalia or Emilia.
Amity f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
Amyas m English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of Amis. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Andrina f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Andrew.
Anemone f English (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
Angelle f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of Angel.
Anima 2 f English (Rare)
Means "soul, spirit" in Latin. In Jungian psychology the anima is an individual's true inner self, or soul.
Anise f English (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
Annora f English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of Honora.
Araminta f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
Arin f & m English (Rare)
Variant of Erin or Aaron.
Aster f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Latin from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star".
Astor m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
Astra f English (Rare)
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
Athelstan m English (Archaic)
Modern form of Æðelstan. This name was revived in Britain the latter half of the 19th century.
Auberon m English (Rare)
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably Alberich.
Aureole f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
Averill m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from the feminine given name Eoforhild.
Azura f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Azure.
Azure f English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
Balfour m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, originally from various place names, which meant "village pasture" in Gaelic.
Barret m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Barrett.
Beaumont m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
Beauregard m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
Berry 2 f English (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
Betony f English (Rare)
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
Bevis m English (Rare)
From an English surname that is possibly derived from the name of the French town Beauvais.
Blondie f English (Rare)
From a nickname for a person with blond hair. This is the name of the title character in a comic strip by Chic Young.
Blythe f & m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
Braidy m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Brady.
Brand m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of Brant.
Branda f English (Rare)
Perhaps a variant of Brandy or a feminine form of Brand.
Bryanne f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Brian.
Brynne f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of Bryn.
Bryony f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρύω (bryo) meaning "to swell".
Burgundy f English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
Caelan m & f English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caolán or Caoilfhionn.
Calanthe f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
Calanthia f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Calanthe.
Camellia f English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
Capricia f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Caprice.
Carlisa f English (Rare)
Combination of Carla and Lisa.
Cate f English (Rare)
Variant of Kate. A famous bearer is Australian actress Cate Blanchett (1969-).
Cedar f & m English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κέδρος (kedros).
Celandine f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
Charis f Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of Chares. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
Charnette f English (Rare)
Probably an invented name.
Chesley m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
Christabel f English (Rare)
Combination of Christina and the name suffix bel. This name occurs in medieval literature, and was later used in 1800 by Samuel Coleridge in his poem Christabel.
Chrysanta f English (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
Cindra f English (Rare)
Combination of Cindy and Sandra.
Clancy m Irish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh, which means "son of Flannchadh". The Irish name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
Clarity f English (Rare)
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".
Clematis f English (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλήμα (klema) meaning "twig, branch".
Clemency f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of Clemence. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
Collyn f & m English (Rare)
Variant of Colleen or Colin 2.
Comfort f English (African)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. It is now most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Coriander f English (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
Cree m & f English (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
Crispin m English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus, which was derived from the name Crispus. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
Cyan f & m English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κύανος (kyanos).
Cybill f English (Rare)
Variant of Sibyl. This name was borne by actress Cybill Shepherd (1950-), who was named after her grandfather Cy and her father Bill.
Cyprian m Polish, English (Rare)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus, which meant "from Cyprus". Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
Cyrilla f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Cyril.
Dacian m Romanian
Derived from Dacia, the old Roman name for the region that is now Romania and Moldova.
Daffodil f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
Daley m & f Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
Daly m & f Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Daley.
Darcey f English
Feminine variant of Darcy.
Dashiell m English (Rare)
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
Davida f English (Rare)
Feminine form of David.
Derby m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Darby.
Diantha f Dutch (Rare), English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
Digby m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of an English town, itself derived from a combination of Old English dic "dyke, ditch" and Old Norse byr "farm, town".
Divina f Spanish (Rare), English (Rare)
From Spanish divina or an elaboration of English divine, both meaning "divine, godlike".
Donelle f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Don.
Doria f English (Rare)
Possibly a feminine form of Dorian or an elaboration of Dora.
Dorris f English
Variant of Doris.
Duana f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Duane.
Dulcibella f English (Archaic)
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
Earleen f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Earl.
Ebba 2 f English (Rare)
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of King Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint named Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.
Edric m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "ruler". After the Norman Conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
Edytha f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Edythe.
Eireann f English (Rare), Irish (Rare)
From Éireann, the genitive case of Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
Elsdon m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Elli's valley" in Old English.
Epiphany f English (Rare)
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) that commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek ἐπιφάνεια (epiphaneia) meaning "manifestation".
Esmond m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
Eustace m English
English form of Eustachius or Eustathius, two names of Greek origin that have been conflated in the post-classical period. Saint Eustace, who is known under both spellings, was a 2nd-century Roman general who became a Christian after seeing a vision of a cross between the antlers of a stag he was hunting. He was burned to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods and is now regarded as the patron saint of hunters. Due to him, this name was common in England during the Middle Ages, though it is presently rare.
Eustacia f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Eustace.
Everard m English (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
Fancy f English (Rare)
From the English word fancy, which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαίνω (phaino) meaning "to show, to appear".
Flannery f & m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
Fleur f French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
Floella f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Flo.
Flower f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
Fortune m & f French, English (Rare)
Simply from the word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
Francene f English (Rare)
English variant of Francine.
Gae f English (Rare)
Variant of Gay.
Gaila f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Gail.
Gallagher m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of Gallchobhar".
Gardenia f English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
Gay f English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
Gladwin m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given name Glædwine.
Glanville m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was taken from a Norman place name, which possibly meant "domain of (a person named) Gland" in Old French.
Gloriana f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem The Faerie Queene (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
Glory f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
Goddard m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the Germanic given name Godehard.
Goodwin m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the given name Godwine.
Grahame m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Graham.
Gypsy f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
Hadyn m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Hayden.
Hamnet m English (Archaic)
Diminutive of Hamo. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play Hamlet.
Happy f & m English (Rare)
From the English word happy, derived from Middle English hap "chance, luck", of Old Norse origin.
Hartley m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English heort "hart, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Haze m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Hayes, sometimes used as a short form of Hazel.
Honey f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
Hyacinth 2 f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see Hyacinthus).
Idelle f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Ida.
Indigo f & m English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon) meaning "Indic, from India".
Isidora f Spanish, Serbian, Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Isidore. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
Jacinth f English (Rare)
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
Jennica f English (Rare)
Combination of Jennifer and Jessica.
Jervis m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Jarvis.
Jessamine f English (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see Jasmine), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
Joandra f English (Rare)
Combination of Joanne and Andrea 2.
Jolyon m English (Rare)
Medieval form of Julian. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his Forsyte Saga novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
Jonelle f English (Rare)
Feminine form of John.
Jonquil f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
Josephina f English (Rare)
Latinate variant of Joséphine.
July f English (Rare)
From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.
Julyan m English (Rare)
Medieval variant of Julian.
Kaety f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Kate.
Karena f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Karen 1, possibly influenced by Carina 1.
Karenza f Cornish
Variant of Kerensa.
Kelia f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name.
Kemp m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
Kerensa f Cornish
Means "love" in Cornish.
Kerenza f Cornish
Variant of Kerensa.
Kestrel f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
Kevyn m & f English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of Kevin.
Kym f English (Rare)
Variant of Kim 1.
Lake m & f English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
Lalia f English (Rare)
Short form of Eulalia.
Lallie f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Lalage.
Lark f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
Lauraine f English (Rare)
Variant of Lorraine influenced by the spelling of Laura.
Lavender f English (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
Leith m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, originally from the name of a Scottish town (now a district of Edinburgh), which is derived from Gaelic lìte "wet, damp". It is also the name of the river that flows though Edinburgh.
Lemoine m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "the monk" in French.
Leontyne f English (Rare)
Variant of Léontine. This name was borne by opera singer Leontyne Price (1927-).
Lewin m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Leofwine.
Leyton m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Layton.
Linnet f English (Rare)
Either a variant of Lynette or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.
Lolicia f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Lola.
Lotus f English (Rare)
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτός (lotos). In Greek and Roman mythology the lotus tree was said to produce a fruit causing sleepiness and forgetfulness.
Lovel m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Lowell.
Luanna f English (Rare)
Either a combination of Lou and Anna or a variant of Luana.
Luvenia f English
Possibly a form of Lavinia. It has been used in America since the 19th century.
Lynna f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Lynn.
Mabella f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Mabel.
Madelina f English (Rare)
Latinate form of Madeline.
Maitland m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a Norman French place name possibly meaning "inhospitable".
Malandra f English (Rare)
Invented name using the popular name suffix andra, from names such as Sandra or Alexandra.
Malone m & f English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Mariabella f English (Rare)
Combination of Maria and Bella.
Maris 2 f English (Rare)
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
Maybelline f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Mabel. This is an American cosmetics company, which was named after the founder's sister Mabel in 1915.
Melantha f English (Rare)
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as Melanie or Melissa) with the suffix antha (from Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play Marriage a la Mode (1672).
Melesina f English (Rare)
Perhaps a form of Millicent. It was borne by the Irish writer and socialite Melesina Trench (1768-1827).
Mercia f English (Rare)
Latinate form of Mercy. This was also the name of an old Anglo-Saxon kingdom, though it has a different origin.
Merit 1 m English (Rare)
Either a variant of Merritt or else simply from the English word merit, ultimately from Latin meritus "deserving".
Merletta f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Merle.
Mikhaila f English (Rare)
Variant of Michaela, possibly influenced by the spelling of Mikhail.
Minty f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Araminta.
Mirabelle f French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Modesty f English (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
Nolene f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Nola.