Names Categorized "sizes"

This is a list of names in which the categories include sizes.
gender
usage
Aava f Finnish
Means "wide, open" in Finnish.
Agung m Indonesian
Means "great, large" in Indonesian.
Amit 1 m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Odia, Punjabi, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Means "immeasurable, infinite" in Sanskrit.
Amita f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Feminine form of Amit 1.
Anima 1 f Indian, Hindi
Means "minuteness" from Sanskrit अणिमन (animan). In yoga texts, this is the name of the ability to make oneself infinitely small so to be invisible.
Anzo m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ant meaning "giant".
Aodhán m Irish
From the Old Irish name Áedán meaning "little fire", a diminutive of Áed (see Aodh). This name was borne by a 6th-century king of Dál Riata. It was also the name of a few early Irish saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Ferns and a 7th-century bishop of Lindisfarne.
Attila m History, Hungarian, Turkish
Possibly means "little father" from Gothic atta "father" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 5th-century leader of the Huns, a nomadic people from Central Asia who had expanded into Eastern Europe by the 4th century. Attila was the name given to him by his Gothic-speaking subjects in Eastern Europe; his real name may have been Avithohol.
Blaanid f Manx
Manx form of Bláthnat.
Bláithín f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Bláthíne.
Blanid f Irish
Anglicized form of Bláthnat.
Bláthnaid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Bláthnat.
Bláthnat f Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from Irish bláth "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
Boris m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German, French
From a Bulgar Turkic name, also recorded as Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his realm to Christianity and is thus regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church. To the north in Kievan Rus it was the name of another saint, a son of Vladimir the Great who was murdered with his brother Gleb in the 11th century. His mother may have been Bulgarian.... [more]
Brynmor m Welsh
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Cáel m Irish Mythology
From Old Irish cáel meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
Caligula m History
Means "little boot" in Latin. This was a nickname for the 1st-century Roman emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus given to him in his youth by his father's soldiers.
Caoilfhionn f Irish
Derived from the Old Irish elements cáel "slender" and finn "fair, white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
Caolán m Irish
From Irish caol meaning "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
Celsus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "tall" in Latin. This was the name of a 2nd-century philosopher who wrote against Christianity. It was also borne by an early saint martyred with Nazarius in Milan.
Chiranjeevi m Indian, Hindi, Telugu
Alternate transcription of Hindi चिरंजीवी or Telugu చిరంజీవి (see Chiranjivi).
Chiranjivi m Indian, Hindi, Telugu
Means "long-lived, infinite" in Sanskrit.
Chiumbo m Eastern African, Mwera
Means "small" in Mwera.
Cosette f French, Literature
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
Courtney f & m English
From an aristocratic English surname that was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose".... [more]
Da m & f Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "achieve, arrive at, intelligent" (which is usually only masculine), () meaning "big, great, vast, high", or other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Dae-Jung m Korean
From Sino-Korean (dae) meaning "big, great, vast, large, high" combined with (jung) meaning "middle". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well. A notable bearer was South Korean president Kim Dae-jung (1924-2009).
Dae-Seong m Korean
From Sino-Korean (dae) meaning "big, great, vast, large, high" combined with (seong) meaning "completed, finished, succeeded". Other combinations of hanja characters can also form this name.
Daichi m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (chi) meaning "earth, land" or (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Daigo m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with combined with (go) meaning "enlightenment" or (go) meaning "I, me". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Daiki m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "tree" or (ki) meaning "valuable". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Daisuke m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" and (suke) meaning "help". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Eloise f English
From the Old French name Héloïse, which was probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil meaning "hale, healthy" and wid meaning "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ἥλιος (helios) meaning "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne by the 12th-century French scholar and philosopher Héloïse. Secretly marrying the theologian Peter Abelard at a young age, she became a nun (and eventually an abbess) after Abelard was violently castrated by order of her uncle Fulbert.... [more]
Féchín m Old Irish
Means "little raven" from Old Irish fiach "raven" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint of the 7th century, the founder of the monastery at Fore. He died of the yellow plague.
Fishel m Yiddish
Means "little fish" in Yiddish, a diminutive of פֿיש (fish) meaning "fish".
Grant m English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
Gwynfor m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with maur meaning "great, large". This name was created in the 19th century.
Hadewidis f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu meaning "battle, combat" and wid meaning "wide".
Haifa f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هيفاء (see Hayfa).
Ha-Jun m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ha) meaning "summer, great, grand" combined with (jun) meaning "approve, permit". This name can be formed by other hanja characters as well.
Hawise f Medieval English
English form of a medieval French name appearing in various spellings such as Haueis or Haouys, which were derived from Hadewidis. The name was borne by a number of Norman and Anglo-Norman noblewomen from the 11th to 13th centuries.
Hayfa f Arabic
Means "slender" in Arabic.
Herenui f Tahitian
From Tahitian here "loved, dear" and nui "big".
Hiroki m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Hiroto m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" or (hiro) meaning "command, esteem" combined with (to) meaning "person", (to) meaning "soar, glide" or (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation. Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Hong m & f Chinese
From Chinese (hóng) meaning "rainbow", (hóng) meaning "enlarge, expand, great" (which is usually only masculine) or 鸿 (hóng) meaning "wild swan, great, vast" (also usually only masculine). Other characters can also form this name.
Hourig f Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Հուրիկ (see Hurik).
Hoyt m English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English hoit "stick", originally a nickname for a thin person.
Hurik f Armenian
Means "small fire" in Armenian.
Japheth m Biblical
From the Hebrew name יֶפֶת (Yefet) meaning "enlarged". In the Old Testament he is one of the three sons of Noah, along with Shem and Ham. He was the ancestor of the peoples of Europe and Northern Asia.
Joktan m Biblical
Means "small" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of Eber in the Old Testament.
Ju f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "chrysanthemum" (which is usually only feminine) or () meaning "big, enormous" (usually only masculine), besides other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Keelan m Irish
Anglicized form of Caolán.
Keelin f Irish
Anglicized form of Caoilfhionn.
Keely f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe, itself derived from the given name Caoladhe, from Irish caol "slender".
Kelvin m English
From the name of a Scottish river, perhaps meaning "narrow water". As a title it was borne by the Irish-Scottish physicist William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), who acquired his title from the river.
Kenta m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" and (ta) meaning "thick, big, great", as well as other kanji combinations having the same pronunciation.
Kentarō m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong", (ta) meaning "thick, big, great" and () meaning "son". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Ketut m & f Balinese
Possibly from a Balinese word meaning "small banana". This name is traditionally given to the fourth child.
Koharu f Japanese
From Japanese (ko) meaning "small" or (ko) meaning "heart" combined with (haru) meaning "spring". The compound word 小春 means "late summer". Other combinations of kanji characters can form this name as well.
Koppány m Hungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "great, tall".
Kōta m Japanese
From Japanese () meaning "peace" and (ta) meaning "thick, big, great". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Landon m English
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
Lomán m Irish
Variant of Lommán.
Lommán m Old Irish
Means "little bare one", derived from Old Irish lomm "bare" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a nephew of Saint Patrick.
Lonán m Irish, Old Irish
Means "little blackbird", derived from Old Irish lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several early saints.
Lorcán m Irish
Means "little fierce one", derived from Old Irish lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Lorcán was a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
Lorccán m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Lorcán.
Luminița f Romanian
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Mahatma m History
From the Indian title महात्मा (Mahatma) meaning "great soul", derived from Sanskrit महा (maha) meaning "great" and आत्मन् (atman) meaning "soul, spirit, life". This title was given to, among others, Mohandas Karamchand, also known as Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948).
Maimu f Estonian
Means "little" in Estonian. This is the name of a girl in the story Maimu (1889) by the Estonian writer August Kitzberg.
Manjusha f Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "small box, small chest" in Sanskrit.
Mikkel m Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of Michael. It can also derive from the Scandinavian root mikill meaning "enormous".
Mitchell m English
From an English surname, itself derived from the given name Michael or in some cases from Middle English michel meaning "big, large".
Morven f Scottish
From the name of a region in western Scotland, also called Morvern or in Gaelic A' Mhorbhairne, meaning "the big gap". This is the location of Fingal's kingdom in James Macpherson's 18th-century poems.
Naomhán m Irish
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Ningal f Sumerian Mythology
Means "great lady", from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and 𒃲 (gal) meaning "big, great". This was the name of a goddess of reeds in Sumerian mythology. She was the daughter of Enki and the wife of Nanna.
Nizar m Arabic
Perhaps from Arabic نزير (nazir) meaning "little".
Odharnait f Irish (Rare)
Derived from odar "dun-coloured, greyish brown, tan" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
Odran m Irish
Anglicized form of Odhrán.
Oisín m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Old Irish oss "deer, stag" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhaill and the narrator in many of his tales.
Ōkuninushi m Japanese Mythology
Means "master of the great country", from Japanese (ō) meaning "big, great", (kuni) meaning "country, land" and (nushi) meaning "master". In Japanese myth he was the divine ruler of the lands, until the gods of the heavens seized control and he retreated to the unseen world.
Onangwatgo m Indigenous American, Oneida (Anglicized)
Means "big medicine" in Oneida, from onúhkwaht "medicine" and the suffix -koó "big, great". This was the name of a chief of the Oneida people, also named Cornelius Hill (1834-1907).
Oran m Irish
Anglicized form of Odhrán.
Orna 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Odharnait.
Ornat f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Odharnait.
Paul m English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
Piloqutinnguaq f Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "little leaf" in Greenlandic, from piloqut "leaf" and the diminutive suffix -nnguaq.
Pocahontas f Indigenous American, Powhatan (Anglicized)
Means "little playful one" in Powhatan, an Algonquian language. This was the nickname of a 17th-century Powhatan woman, a daughter of the powerful chief Wahunsenacawh. She married the white colonist John Rolfe and travelled with him to England, but died of illness before returning.
Qays m Arabic
Means "measurement" in Arabic. This was the real name of Majnun, the lover of Layla, in Nizami Ganjavi's 12th-century poem Layla and Majnun.
Quinlan m & f English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoindealbháin, itself from the given name Caoindealbhán (Old Irish Caíndelbán).
Riordan m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Ríoghbhárdáin), which was derived from the given name Rígbarddán.
Rochelle f English
From the name of the French city La Rochelle, meaning "little rock". It first became commonly used as a given name in America in the 1930s, probably due to the fame of actress Rochelle Hudson (1914-1972) and because of the similarity to the name Rachel.
Rónán m Irish, Old Irish
Means "little seal", derived from Old Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early Irish saints, including a pilgrim to Brittany who founded the hermitage at Locronan in the 6th century.
Ronan m Breton, Irish, French, English (Modern)
Breton and Anglicized form of Rónán.
Russ m English
Short form of Russell.
Russel m English
Variant of Russell.
Russell m English
From an English surname, of Norman origin, meaning "little red one" (a diminutive of Old French rous "red"). A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.... [more]
Ryan m English
From a common Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Riain. This patronymic derives from the given name Rian, which is of uncertain meaning. It is traditionally said to mean "little king", from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix.... [more]
Ryōta m Japanese
From Japanese (ryō) meaning "cool, refreshing", (ryō) meaning "clear" or (ryō) meaning "good" combined with (ta) meaning "thick, big, great". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
Sayuri f Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "small" and 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations.
Seanán m Irish
Modern Irish form of Senán.
Senán m Irish, Old Irish
Means "little old one", derived from Old Irish sen "old" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Senán was a 6th-century monk who founded the monastery on Inis Cathaigh.
Senan m Irish
Anglicized form of Senán.
Senga f Scottish
Sometimes explained as an anagram of Agnes, but more likely derived from Gaelic seang "slender".
Sirpa f Finnish
Derived from Finnish sirpale meaning "small piece, fragment".
Sōta m Japanese
From Japanese () meaning "sudden, sound of the wind" and (ta) meaning "thick, big, great". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
Sota m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 颯太 (see Sōta).
Souta m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 颯太 (see Sōta).
Tai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (tài) meaning "very, extreme" or other characters pronounced in a similar way.
Taichi m Japanese
From Japanese (ta) meaning "thick, big, great" and (ichi) meaning "one", in addition to other combinations of kanji that are pronounced the same way.
Taiki m Japanese
From Japanese (tai) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Takahiro m Japanese
From Japanese (taka) meaning "valuable" or (taka) meaning "filial piety" combined with (hiro) meaning "big, great" or (hiro) meaning "prosperous". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Talita f Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Talitha, popular in Brazil.
Talitha f Biblical
Means "little girl" in Aramaic. The name is taken from the phrase talitha cumi meaning "little girl arise" spoken by Jesus in order to restore a young girl to life (see Mark 5:41).
Tamir m Hebrew
Means "tall" in Hebrew.
Tanu f Indian, Hindi
Means "slender" in Sanskrit.
Tanvi f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "slender woman" in Sanskrit.
Tao m Chinese
From Chinese (tāo) meaning "large waves", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Taro m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 太郎 (see Tarō).
Tarō m Japanese
From Japanese (ta) meaning "thick, big, great" and () meaning "son". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Tarou m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 太郎 (see Tarō).
Taylan m Turkish
Means "tall" in Turkish.
Trevor m Welsh, English
From a Welsh surname, originally taken from the name of towns in Wales meaning "big village", derived from Middle Welsh tref "village" and maur "large". As a given name it became popular in the United Kingdom in the middle of the 20th century, then caught on in the United States in the 1960s.
Urvi f Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "wide" in Sanskrit.
Vaughn m English
From a Welsh surname, a variant of Vaughan.
Vibol m Khmer
Means "abundant, vast" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit विपुल (vipula).
Vida 1 m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Wido or Vitus.
Vidar m Norwegian, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Víðarr, which was possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, Ragnarök, it is said he will avenge his father's death by slaying the wolf Fenrir.
Vishal m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Bengali
Means "wide, broad, spacious" in Sanskrit.
Víðarr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Vidar.
Wei m & f Chinese
From Chinese (wēi) meaning "power, pomp", (wēi) meaning "high, lofty, towering" or (wěi) meaning "great, robust, extraordinary". As a feminine name it can come from (wēi) meaning "small" or (wēi) meaning "fern". This name can be formed by other Chinese characters besides those shown here.
Wido m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element witu "wood" or wit "wide". From early times this name has been confused with the Latin name Vitus.
Xia m & f Chinese
From Chinese (xià) meaning "summer, great, grand", (xiá) meaning "rosy clouds", or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Yamato m Japanese
From Yamato, an ancient name for Japan. It can also refer to the Yamato period in Japanese history, which lasted into the 8th century. The individual kanji are meaning "great" and meaning "harmony".
Yeray m Spanish (Canarian)
Canarian Spanish name of recent origin, possibly from a Guanche word or place name meaning "big, grand".
Youta m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 陽太 (see Yōta).