Names Starting with A

gender
usage
Ashfaq m Arabic
Means "compassions, kindness" in Arabic.
Åshild f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Áshildr, derived from the elements áss "god" and hildr "battle".
Áshildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åshild.
Ashish m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
From Sanskrit आशिष (ashisha) meaning "prayer, blessing".
Ashkii m Indigenous American, Navajo
Means "boy" in Navajo.
Ashlea f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashlee f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashleigh f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashley f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. It reached its height of popularity in America in 1987, but it did not become the highest ranked name until 1991, being overshadowed by the likewise-popular Jessica until then. In the United Kingdom it is still more common as a masculine name.
Ashlie f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashling f Irish
Anglicized form of Aisling.
Ashlyn f English (Modern)
Combination of Ashley and the popular name suffix lyn.
Ashmedai m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Hebrew form of Asmodeus found in the Talmud.
Ashoka m Sanskrit
Means "without sorrow" in Sanskrit. This name was borne by Ashoka the Great, a 3rd-century BC emperor of India.
Ashraqat f Arabic
Means "brightness" in Arabic.
Ashtad f Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬱𐬙𐬁𐬙 (Arshtāt) meaning "justice, honesty, rightness", derived from 𐬀𐬴𐬀 (asha) meaning "truth, order". This was the name of a Yazata (a holy being) in Zoroastrianism.
'Ashtart f Semitic Mythology
Phoenician form of Ashtoreth.
Ashton m & f English (Modern)
From an English surname, itself derived from a place name meaning "ash tree town" in Old English. This was a rare masculine name until the 1980s, when it gradually began becoming more common for both genders. Inspired by the female character Ashton Main from the 1985 miniseries North and South, parents in America gave it more frequently to girls than boys from 1986 to 1997. Since then it has been overwhelmingly masculine once again, perhaps due in part to the fame of the actor Ashton Kutcher (1978-).
Ashtoreth f Biblical, Semitic Mythology
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar.
Ashtyn f & m English (Modern)
Variant of Ashton.
Ashur m Semitic Mythology
From the name of the city of Ashur, the capital of the Assyrian Empire, which is of unknown meaning. Ashur was the patron deity of the city and the chief god of Assyria.
Ashura f Eastern African, Swahili
From the name of an Islamic holy day that commemorates the death of Husayn ibn Ali. It is so named because it falls on the tenth day of Muharram, deriving from Arabic عشرة ('asharah) meaning "ten".
Ashurbanipal m Ancient Assyrian (Anglicized)
From Akkadian Ashur-bani-apli meaning "Ashur is creator of a son". This was the name of one of the final kings of the Assyrian Empire, reigning late in the 7th century BC. He appears in the Old Testament under the name Asnappar.
Ashwin m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit अश्विन् (ashvin) meaning "possessed of horses". The Ashvins are twin Hindu gods of the sunrise and sunset.
Asia 1 f English (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
Asia 2 f Polish
Polish diminutive of Joanna.
Asier m Basque
Means "the beginning", from Basque hasi.
Asif m Arabic
Possibly means "forgiveness" in Arabic.
Asih f Indonesian
Variant of Kasih.
Asil m Turkish
Means "noble" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic أصيل (asil).
Asım m Turkish
Turkish form of Asim 1.
Asim 1 m Arabic
Means "protector" in Arabic.
Asim 2 m Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "boundless, limitless" in Sanskrit.
Asiri f Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "smile" in Quechua.
Asiya f Arabic
Possibly from Arabic أسي (asy) meaning "distressed, grieved". According to Islamic tradition this was the name of the wife of the pharaoh at the time of Moses. She took care of the infant Moses and later accepted monotheism.
Asiye f Turkish
Turkish form of Asiya.
Asja f Bosnian
Bosnian form of Asiya.
Ask m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
Ásketill m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse áss "god" and ketill "cauldron, helmet".
Asklepiades m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name that was derived from the name of the Greek god Asklepios combined with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). It was borne by several Greek physicians.
Asklepios m Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. Asklepios (Aesculapius to the Romans) was the god of healing and medicine in Greek mythology. He was the son of Apollo and Coronis.
Askr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Ask.
Aslan m Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian, Literature
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
Aslanbek m Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Derived from Turkish aslan meaning "lion" combined with the Turkic military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
Áslaug f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Aslaug.
Aslaug f Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "vowed, promised, bound in oath".
Aslı f Turkish
Means "genuine, real" in Turkish.
Aslög f Swedish (Rare)
Swedish form of Aslaug.
Asløg f Danish (Rare)
Danish form of Aslaug.
Əsma f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Asma.
Asma f Arabic, Urdu, Bengali
Means "supreme" in Arabic.
Asmaa f Arabic
Means "appellations, names" in Arabic. This was the name of a daughter of Abu Bakr, the first caliph of the Muslims.
Asma'u f Western African, Hausa
Hausa form of Asma.
Asmodaios m Biblical Greek
Greek form of Asmodeus found in the Book of Tobit.
Asmodeus m Biblical, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Greek Ἀσμοδαῖος (Asmodaios) and Hebrew אשְׁמְדּאי ('Ashmed'ai), probably from Avestan 𐬀𐬉𐬱𐬆𐬨𐬀 (aēshəma) meaning "wrath" and 𐬛𐬀𐬉𐬎𐬎𐬀 (daēuua) meaning "demon". In the apocryphal Book of Tobit this is the name of a demon who successively kills seven of Sarah's husbands on their wedding nights. He also appears in the Talmud.
Åsmund m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ásmundr, derived from the elements áss "god" and mundr "protection" (a cognate of Osmond).
Ásmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åsmund.
Ásmundur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Åsmund.
Asnappar m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From אָסְנַפַּר ('Asnappar), the Hebrew form of Ashurbanipal. This name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the Assyrian king.
Åsne f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ásný, derived from the elements áss "god" and nýr "new".
Ásný f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åsne.
Aspasia f Ancient Greek, Greek
Derived from Greek ἀσπάσιος (aspasios) meaning "welcome, embrace". This was the name of the lover of Pericles (5th century BC).
Aspen f English (Modern)
From the English word for a variety of deciduous trees in the genus Populus, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
Asra f Arabic
Means "travel at night" in Arabic. It is related to Isra.
Asse m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the elements asc meaning "ash tree" or ansi meaning "god".
Assia f Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic آسيا or آسية (see Asiya) chiefly used in Northern Africa.
Assol f Russian (Rare), Literature
From the 1923 Russian novel Scarlet Sails by Alexander Grin, adapted into a 1961 Soviet movie. In the story, Assol is a young girl who is told by a prophetic old man that she will one day marry a prince. The meaning of the name is not uncertain, but it has been suggested that it was inspired by the Russian question а соль (a sol) meaning "and the salt?".
Assumpció f Catalan
Catalan cognate of Asunción.
Assumpta f Irish
Latinate form of Assunta, used especially in Ireland.
Assunção f Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of Asunción.
Assunta f Italian
Means "taken up, received, assumed" in Italian, referring to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
Ásta f Old Norse, Icelandic
Short form of Ástríðr. It nearly coincides with Icelandic ást meaning "love".
Asta f Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Short form of Astrid.
Astaroth m Literature
From Ashtaroth, the plural form of Ashtoreth used in the Bible to refer to Phoenician idols. This spelling was used in late medieval demonology texts to refer to a type of (masculine) demon.
Aster f & m English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Latin from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star".
Asteria f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Asterios (see Asterius). In Greek mythology Asteria was a daughter of the Titans Phoebe and Coeus.
Asterius m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀστέριος (Asterios) meaning "starry", a derivative of ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star". This is the name of several figures from Greek mythology. It was also borne by a few early saints.
Asterix m Popular Culture
The name of a Gaulish hero (Astérix in the original French) in a comic book series of the same name, debuting 1959. His name is a pun based on French astérisque meaning "asterisk, little star" but appearing to end with the Gaulish element rix meaning "king" (seen for example in the historical figure Vercingetorix). All male Gauls in the series have humorous names ending with -ix.
Aştî f & m Kurdish
Means "peace, tranquility" in Kurdish.
Aston m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name Æðelstan.
Astor m English (Rare)
From a German and French surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk". The wealthy and influential Astor family, prominent in British and American society, originated in the Italian Alps.
Astoria f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Astor. This is also the name of several American towns, after the businessman John Jacob Astor.
Astra f English (Rare)
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
Astraea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀστραία (Astraia), derived from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
Astrape f Greek Mythology
Means "lightning" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of lightning, an attendant of Zeus.
Astri f Norwegian
Variant of Astrid.
Astrid f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French, English
Modern Scandinavian form of Ástríðr. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking. It was also borne by a Swedish princess (1905-1935) who became the queen of Belgium as the wife of Leopold III.
Astride f French
French variant of Astrid.
Astrit m Albanian
Means "green whip snake, dragon" in Albanian.
Ástríðr f Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
Ástríður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ástríðr.
Astrophel m Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star" and φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella.
Asuka f & m Japanese
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
Asuman f Turkish
Means "sky" in Turkish.
Asun f Spanish
Short form of Asunción.
Asunción f Spanish
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
Ásvaldr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements áss "god" and valdr "ruler" (a cognate of Oswald).
Aswathi m Indian, Malayalam
From Sanskrit अशवत्थ (ashvattha) meaning "sacred fig tree".
Asya 2 f Turkish
Means "Asia (continent)" in Turkish.
Asylym f Kazakh
Means "my dear" in Kazakh, derived from асыл (asyl) meaning "precious, noble" and the possessive suffix ым (ym) meaning "my".
Ata 1 m Turkish
Means "ancestor" in Turkish.
Ata 2 m Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
Ātaahua f Maori
Means "beautiful" in Maori.
Atabek m Kazakh, Kyrgyz
From the Turkic noble title atabeg, derived from ata meaning "father, ancestor" and beg meaning "chieftain, master".
Atahualpa m Indigenous American, Quechua (Anglicized)
From Quechua Atawallpa meaning "fortunate hen", from ataw meaning "fortunate, lucky" and wallpa meaning "hen". This was the name of the last sovereign Inca emperor. He was executed by the Spanish in 1533.
Atajan m Turkmen
From Turkmen ata meaning "father, ancestor" combined with the suffix jan meaning "dear, darling" (of Persian origin).
Atalanta f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἀταλάντη (Atalante) meaning "equal in weight", derived from ἀτάλαντος (atalantos), a word related to τάλαντον (talanton) meaning "a scale, a balance". In Greek legend she was a fast-footed maiden who refused to marry anyone who could not beat her in a race. She was eventually defeated by Hippomenes, who dropped three golden apples during the race causing her to stop to pick them up.
Atalia f Hebrew
Modern Hebrew transcription of Athaliah.
Atallah m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عطا الله (see Ataullah).
Atalyah f & m Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of Athaliah.
Atanas m Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Athanasius.
Atanasij m Macedonian
Macedonian form of Athanasius.
Atanasija f Serbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian feminine form of Athanasius.
Atanasije m Serbian
Serbian form of Athanasius.
Atanasio m Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of Athanasius.
Atara f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew עֲטָרָה (see Atarah).
Atarah f Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "crown" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Atarah is a minor character, the wife of Jerahmeel.
Ataullah m Arabic
Means "gift of Allah" from Arabic عطاء ('ata) meaning "gift" combined with الله (Allah).
Atefeh f Persian
Persian form of Atifa.
Atenea f Spanish
Spanish form of Athena.
Aþalaberhtaz m Old Germanic (Hypothetical)
Proto-Germanic reconstruction of Adalbert and Æþelbeorht.
Aþalafuns m Gothic (Hypothetical)
Possible Gothic form of Alfonso.
Aþalawulfaz m Old Germanic (Hypothetical)
Proto-Germanic reconstruction of Adalwolf, Aþawulfs and Æðelwulf.
Aðalbjörg f Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Athaliah f & m Biblical
Possibly means "Yahweh is exalted" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is both a feminine and masculine name. It was borne by the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, who later came to rule Judah as a queen.
Aðalsteinn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and steinn "stone".
Athan m Greek
Short form of Athanasios.
Athanaric m Gothic (Anglicized)
From the Gothic name *Aþanareiks, derived from the element aþn meaning "year" combined with reiks meaning "ruler, king". Athanaric was a 4th-century ruler of the Visigoths.
Athanas m Ancient Greek
Short form of Athanasios (see Athanasius).
Athanase m French
French form of Athanasius.
Athanasi m Medieval Slavic
Old Slavic form of Athanasius.
Athanasia f Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Athanasios (see Athanasius).
Athanasius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Ἀθανάσιος (Athanasios) meaning "immortal", from Greek (a), a negative prefix, combined with θάνατος (thanatos) meaning "death". Saint Athanasius was a 4th-century bishop of Alexandria who strongly opposed Arianism.
Athaulf m Gothic (Modernized)
Contemporary spelling of the Gothic name *Aþawulfs, derived from the elements aþals "nobility" and wulfs "wolf" (making it a cognate of Adolf). Alternatively, the first element could be atta "father". This was the name of a 5th-century king of the Visigoths.
Aþawulfs m Gothic (Hypothetical)
Possible Gothic form of Athaulf.
Athelstan m English (Archaic)
Modern form of Æðelstan. This name was revived in Britain the latter half of the 19th century.
Athena f Greek Mythology, English
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.... [more]
Athénaïs f French
French form of Athenais.
Athenais f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name that was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Athena.
Athenodoros m Ancient Greek
Means "gift of Athena" from the name of the god Athena combined with Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift".
Athina f Greek
Modern Greek form of Athena.
Athol m & f Scottish
From Atholl, the name of a district in Scotland, from Scottish Gaelic Athall, possibly derived from Old Irish ath Fhotla "new Ireland".
Atieno f Eastern African, Luo
Feminine form of Otieno.
Atif m Arabic
Means "affection, kindness" in Arabic.
Atifa f Arabic
Feminine form of Atif.
Atila m Turkish
Turkish variant of Attila.
Atílio m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Attilius (see Attilio).
Atilio m Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish form of Attilius (see Attilio).
Atilius m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Attilio.
Atilla m Turkish
Turkish variant of Attila.
Atiya m & f Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
Atlas m Greek Mythology
Possibly means "enduring" from Greek τλάω (tlao) meaning "to endure". In Greek mythology he was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
Atle m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Atli.
Atli m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Attila, used in the Norse Völsungasaga to refer to a fictional version of Attila the Hun.
Aton m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jtn meaning "solar disk". Aton was an Egyptian god of the sun, depicted as a solar disk with long rays extending downwards. The worship of Aton was especially extensive during the 14th-century BC reign of the pharaoh Akhenaton, who proclaimed Aton was the only god.
Atossa f Old Persian (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Old Persian *𐎢𐎫𐎢𐎰 (Utautha) meaning "well granting". It was notably borne by the eldest daughter of Cyrus the Great, who married Darius the Great in the 6th century BC.
Atousa f Persian
Modern Persian form of Atossa.
Atreus m Greek Mythology
Means "fearless", derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and τρέω (treo) meaning "to fear, to flee". In Greek mythology, Atreus was a king of Mycenae and the father of Agamemnon and Menelaus.
Atropos f Greek Mythology
Means "inevitable, inflexible" in Greek, derived from the negative prefix (a) combined with τρόπος (tropos) meaning "direction, manner, fashion". Atropos was one of the three Fates or Μοῖραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. When her sister Lachesis decided that a person's life was at an end, Atropos would choose the manner of death and cut the person's life thread.
Atse m Frisian
Variant of Ade 2.
Atsuko f Japanese
From Japanese (atsu) meaning "warm", (atsu) meaning "deep, true, sincere" or (atsu) meaning "honest" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Atsushi m Japanese
From Japanese (atsushi) meaning "pure" or (atsushi) meaning "kindness, honesty". This name can also be formed from other kanji or kanji combinations.
Atte m Finnish
Finnish diminutive of Antero and other names beginning with A.
Atticus m Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
Attikos m Ancient Greek
Greek form of Atticus.
Attila m History, Hungarian, Turkish
Probably means "little father" from Gothic atta "father" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 5th-century leader of the Huns, a nomadic people from Central Asia who had expanded into Eastern Europe by the 4th century. Attila was likely the name given to him by his Gothic-speaking subjects in Eastern Europe; his real name may have been Avitohol.
Attilio m Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Atilius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. Marcus Atilius Regulus was a Roman consul and hero of the First Punic War.
Atuf m Arabic
Means "loving" in Arabic.
Atum m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jtm or tmw, derived from tm meaning "completion, totality". This was the name of an Egyptian creator god. He was first prominently worshipped in Heliopolis during the Old Kingdom.
Auberi m Medieval French
Old French form of Aubrey.
Auberon m Literature
From a diminutive form of Auberi, an Old French form of Alberich. It is the name of the fairy king in the 13th-century epic Huon de Bordeaux.
Aubert m French
French variant of Albert.
Aubin m French
French form of Albinus.
Aubree f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Aubrey.
Aubrey m & f English
From Auberi, an Old French form of Alberich brought to England by the Normans. It was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
Aubrianna f English (Modern)
Combination of Aubrey and Anna.
Aubrielle f English (Modern)
Combination of Aubrey and the popular name suffix elle.
Aucaman m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche, from awka- "wild" and mañke "condor".
Aud f Norwegian
Norwegian form of Auðr.
Auda f Germanic
Feminine form of Audo (see Otto).
Audamar m Germanic
Old German form of Otmar.
Audaweniz m Old Germanic (Hypothetical)
Proto-Germanic reconstruction of Eadwine and Audowin.
Aude f French
French feminine form of Aldo.
Audhild f Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements auðr "wealth, fortune" and hildr "battle".
Audie m & f English
In the case of the famed American soldier Audie Murphy (1925-1971), it is of uncertain meaning. As a feminine name, it can be a diminutive of Audrey.
Audley m English
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning "Ealdgyð's clearing" in Old English.
Audo m Germanic
Old German form of Otto.
Audoin m Lombardic (Latinized)
From Audoinus, the Latin form of the Germanic names Audowin or Aldwin. Audoin (or Auduin or Alduin) was a 6th-century king of the Lombards.
Audowin m Germanic
Derived from the Old Frankish element aud, Old High German ot meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with wini meaning "friend". This is a cognate of Edwin.
Audra 1 f Lithuanian
Means "storm" in Lithuanian.
Audra 2 f English
Variant of Audrey, used since the 19th century. It jumped in popularity in the United States after the debut of the television series The Big Valley (1965-1969), which featured the character Audra Barkley.
Audrey f English, French
Medieval diminutive of Æðelþryð. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also used by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
Audun m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Auðun.
August m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of Augustus. This was the name of three Polish kings.... [more]
Augusta f Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Augustus. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
Augustas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Augustus.
Auguste 1 m French
French form of Augustus.
Auguste 2 f German
German variant of Augusta.
Augustė f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Augusta.
Augustijn m Dutch (Rare)
Dutch form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Augustín m Slovak
Slovak form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Augustin m French, Romanian, Czech, German (Rare)
Form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1) in several languages.
Augustina f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Augustinas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Augustine 1 m English
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name Augustus. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.
Augustine 2 f French
French feminine form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Augusto m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Augustus.
Augusts m Latvian
Latvian form of Augustus.
Augustus m Ancient Roman, Dutch (Rare)
Means "exalted, venerable", derived from Latin augere meaning "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. In 26 BC the senate officially gave him the name Augustus, and after his death it was used as a title for subsequent emperors. This was also the name of three kings of Poland (August in Polish).
Augustyn m Polish
Polish form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Auke m Frisian
Possibly a Frisian diminutive of Augustinus or Aurelius.
Aukusti m Finnish
Finnish form of Augustus.
Aulay m Scottish
Anglicized form of Amhlaidh.
Auli f Finnish
Short form of Aulikki.
Aulikki f Finnish
Feminine form of Aulis.
Aulis m Finnish
Means "willing, helpful" in Finnish.
Aulus m Ancient Roman
Possibly from Latin avulus meaning "little grandfather", though it could be from the Etruscan name Aule, which was possibly derived from avils meaning "years". This was a Roman praenomen, or given name. Folk etymology connects it to Latin aula meaning "palace".
Aune f Finnish
Finnish form of Agnes.
Aura f English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
Aurangzeb m History
Means "honouring the throne" in Persian. This was the name of a 17th-century Mughal emperor of India.
Áurea f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Aurea.
Aurea f Late Roman
Late Latin name that was derived from aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
Aurél m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Aurelius.
Aurel m Romanian, German (Rare)
Romanian and German form of Aurelius.
Aurèle m French
French form of Aurelius.
Aurélia f Slovak, Hungarian, Portuguese, French
Slovak, Hungarian and Portuguese feminine form of Aurelius, as well as a French variant of Aurélie.
Aurelian m Romanian, History
Romanian form of Aurelianus, as well as the usual English form when referring to the Roman emperor.
Aureliano m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Aurelianus.
Aurelianus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was originally derived from the Roman family name Aurelius. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor (Lucius Domitius Aurelianus) who reconquered the breakaway Gallic and Palmyrene Empires.
Aurélie f French
French feminine form of Aurelius.
Aurélien m French
French form of Aurelianus.
Aurelija f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Aurelia.
Aurelijus m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Aurelius.
Aurélio m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Aurelius.
Aurelio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Aurelius.
Aurelius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from Latin aureus meaning "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
Aureliusz m Polish
Polish form of Aurelius.
Aureole f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
Aurica f Romanian
Romanian diminutive of Aurelia.
Aurică m Romanian
Romanian diminutive of Aurel.
Aurobindo m Bengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of Aravind.
Auroora f Finnish
Finnish variant of Aurora.
Aurora f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Romanian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
Aurore f French
French form of Aurora.
Ausma f Latvian
Means "dawn" in Latvian.
Aušra f Lithuanian
Means "dawn" in Lithuanian.
Austėja f Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Means "to weave" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of bees.
Auster m Roman Mythology
Means "south" in Latin (descended from the Indo-European root *hews- meaning "dawn", making it related to the English word east). Auster was the Roman god of the south wind.
Austin m English
Medieval contracted form of Augustine 1. Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
Austra f Latvian
Latvian cognate of Aušra.
Austyn m & f English (Modern)
Variant or feminine form of Austin.
Auðr f & m Old Norse
Means "wealth, fortune" in Old Norse.
Auðrhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Audhild.
Auðun m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse auðr "wealth, fortune" and vinr "friend".
Auður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Auðr.
Autumn f English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
Auxentios m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek αὐξάνω (auxano) meaning "to increase, to grow". This name was borne by a few early saints.
Ava 1 f English
Variant of Eve. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It began to rise sharply after 1997, possibly inspired by the actress Heather Locklear and musician Richie Sambora when they used it for their baby daughter that year.
Ava 2 f Persian
Means "voice, sound" in Persian.
Ava 3 f German, Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element awi, of unknown meaning. This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
Avag m Armenian
Means "senior, elder, chief" in Armenian.
Avalon f English (Rare)
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit that was often linked with paradise.
Avani f Indian, Marathi, Gujarati, Hindi
Means "earth" in Sanskrit.
Avanti f Indian, Hindi
From the name of an ancient kingdom of central India that had its capital at Ujjain.
Avdey m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Obadiah.
'Avdi'el m Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of Abdiel.
Avdotya f Russian
Russian form of Eudocia.