Names Categorized "animals"

This is a list of names in which the categories include animals.
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GILLES m French
French form of GILES.
GOPALA m Hinduism
Means "cow protector" from Sanskrit गो (go) meaning "cow" and पाल (pala) meaning "guard, protector". This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna. This name was also borne by the 8th-century founder of the Pala Empire in Bengal.
GOPINATHA m Hinduism
Means "leader of the gopis" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, acquired because of his association with the gopis, who are cow-herding girls.
GOTAM m Indian, Hindi (Rare)
Modern form of GOTAMA.
GOTAMA m Hinduism
Means "the best ox" from Sanskrit गो (go) meaning "ox, cow" and तम (tama) meaning "best". In Hindu texts this is the name of one of the Saptarshis, or seven sages. This name was also born by an early Indian philosopher who wrote the Nyaya Sutras.
GUADALUPE f & m Spanish
From a Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, meaning "Our Lady of Guadalupe". Guadalupe is a Spanish place name, the site of a famous convent, derived from Arabic وادي (wadi) meaning "valley, river" possibly combined with Latin lupus meaning "wolf". In the 16th century Our Lady of Guadalupe supposedly appeared in a vision to a native Mexican man, and she is now regarded as a patron saint of the Americas.
GULL f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
GUNDHRAM m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GUNTRAM.
GUNTRAM m German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GWALCHMEI m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with mei "May (the month)". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend. He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from Arthurian romance.
HADIL f Arabic
Means "cooing (of a pigeon)" in Arabic.
HAGNE f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of AGNES.
HAIDAR m Arabic
Means "lion, warrior" in Arabic. This is a title of Ali, the husband of Fatimah the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.
HAIDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
HALCYON f Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as ALCYONE).
HALCYONE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Αλκυονη (Halkyone), a variant of Αλκυονη (see ALCYONE).
HARI m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HARISHA m Hinduism
Means "lord of monkeys" from Sanskrit हरि (hari) meaning "monkey" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
HARLAND m English
From a surname that was a variant of HARLAN.
HARTLEY m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HARUTO m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HAVEL m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HAYATO m Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HAYDAR m Turkish
Turkish form of HAIDAR.
HAYDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
HAYTHAM m Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
HELIOS m Greek Mythology
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, a Titan, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses. His sister was the moon goddess Selene.
HENGIST m Ancient Germanic
Of Germanic origin, meaning "stallion". According to medieval histories, Hengist and his brother Horsa were the leaders of the first Saxon settlers in Britain. Hengist established a kingdom in Kent in the 5th century.
HERON m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HERSH m Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish הירש (see HIRSH).
HERU m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of HORUS.
HEYDAR m Persian
Persian form of HAIDAR.
HIPPOCRATES m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ιπποκρατης (Hippokrates) meaning "horse power", derived from the elements ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and κρατος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
HIPPOLYTA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of HIPPOLYTE (1). Shakespeare used this name in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
HIPPOLYTOS m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "freer of horses" from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and λυω (luo) meaning "to loosen". In Greek legend he was the son of Theseus who was tragically loved by his stepmother Phaedra. This was also the name of a 3rd-century theologian, saint and martyr.
HJÖRTUR m Icelandic
Means "deer" in Icelandic.
HONG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (hóng) meaning "rainbow", (hóng) meaning "enlarge, expand, great" (which is usually only masculine) or 鸿 (hóng) meaning "wild swan, great, vast" (also usually only masculine). Other characters can also form this name.
HORATIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of HORATIUS.
HOROS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Heru (see HORUS).
HORST m German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
HORUS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HOTARU f Japanese
From Japanese (hotaru) meaning "firefly".
HOWARD m English
From an English surname that can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HOWIE m English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HRAFN m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
HUITZILOPOCHTLI m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "southern hummingbird" or "left-handed hummingbird" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the god of the sun and war. He was a patron deity of the city of Tenochtitlan (at the site of modern Mexico City).
HULDAH f Biblical
Means "weasel, mole" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to a prophetess.
HUMBERT m French, German (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HUMPHREY m English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca.
HUNBERCT m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMBERT.
HUNFRID m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMPHREY.
HYDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
IINES f Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
INÉS f Spanish
Spanish form of AGNES.
INÈS f French
French form of INÉS.
INÊS f Portuguese
Portuguese form of AGNES.
INES f Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
INEZ f English
English form of INÉS.
INGOLF m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
IO f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
IONA (2) m Russian, Georgian, Biblical Latin
Form of JONAH used in the Latin Old Testament, as well as the Russian and Georgian form.
IONAS m Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin
Form of JONAH used in the Greek Bible. It is also the form used in the Latin New Testament.
IRVIN m English
From a surname that was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRWIN m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
IVAYLO m Bulgarian
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
IZEM m Northern African, Berber
Means "lion" in Tamazight.
JAEL f Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JAGIENKA f Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JAGNA f Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JANJA f Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of AGNES. It also may be inspired by Serbo-Croatian janje meaning "lamb".
JAY (1) m English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JELENA f Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA in several languages. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JEMIMA f Biblical, English
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JOEY m & f English
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JONAH m English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
JÓNAS m Icelandic
Icelandic form of JONAH.
JONÁŠ m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of JONAH.
JONAS (2) m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JOONA m Finnish
Finnish form of JONAH.
JOONAS m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of JONAS (2).
JORUNN f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Jórunnr, derived from the elements jór "horse" and unna "love".
JOSTEIN m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Jósteinn, derived from the elements jór "horse" and steinn "stone".
KALEB m English (Modern)
English variant of CALEB.
KALLISTO f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek καλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful", a derivative of καλος (kalos) meaning "beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.
KAPIL m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Modern form of KAPILA.
KAPILA m Hinduism
Means "reddish brown" in Sanskrit, derived from कपि (kapi) meaning "monkey". In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata this is the name of a sage who founded Samkhya philosophy and is identified with the god Vishnu.
KATIDA f Esperanto
From Esperanto katido meaning "kitten".
KELEBEK f Turkish
Means "butterfly" in Turkish.
KESTREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KFIR m Hebrew
Means "lion cub" in Hebrew.
KHULAN f Mongolian
Means "onager, wild donkey" in Mongolian. This was the name of a wife of Genghis Khan.
KIMIMELA f Native American, Sioux
Means "butterfly" in Lakota.
KIRKE f Greek Mythology
Greek form of CIRCE.
KIT m & f English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
KITTY f English
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KOLOMAN m German (Rare), Slovak
German and Slovak form of COLMÁN. Saint Koloman (also called Coloman or Colman) was an Irish monk who was martyred in Stockerau in Austria.
KORBINIAN m German
Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see RABAN).
KÖRBL m German
Diminutive of KORBINIAN.
LÆRKE f Danish
Means "lark" in Danish.
LAGLE f Estonian
Means "goose" in Estonian.
LAOGHAIRE m Irish
Modern Irish form of LÓEGAIRE.
LARK f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAVI m Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
LEANDER m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λεανδρος (Leandros), derived from λεων (leon) meaning "lion" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
LÉANDRE m French
French form of LEANDER.
LEANDRO m Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LEANDER.
LEARY m Irish
Anglicized form of LAOGHAIRE.
LEDA f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
LELLE m Swedish
Diminutive of LENNART.
LEN m English
Short form of LEONARD.
LENARD m English
Variant of LEONARD.
LENART m Slovene
Slovene form of LEONARD.
LENNARD m Dutch
Dutch variant of LEONARD.
LENNART m Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENNIE m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LENNY m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LÉO m French
French form of LEO.
LEO m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEOLA f English
Feminine form of LEO.
LEOLIN m Welsh
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by Latin leo "lion".
LÉON m French
French form of LEON.
LEÓN m Spanish
Spanish form of LEON. León is also the name of a province in Spain, though the etymology is unrelated.
LEON m English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONA f English, German, Czech
Feminine form of LEON.
LÉONARD m French
French form of LEONARD.
LEONARD m English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
LEONARDA f Italian
Feminine form of LEONARDO.
LEONARDO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the Mona Lisa. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of LEON.
LÉONCE m French
French form of LEONTIOS.
LEONCIO m Spanish
Spanish form of LEONTIOS.
LÉONE f French
French feminine form of LEON.
LEONE (1) m Italian
Italian form of LEON.
LEONE (2) f English
Variant of LEONA.
LEONHARD m German
German form of LEONARD. A famous bearer was the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler (1707-1783), who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LEONID m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of LEONIDAS.
LEONIDA m Italian
Italian form of LEONIDAS.
LEONIDAS m Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion" combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life and his army defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.
LÉONIDE m & f French (Rare)
French masculine and feminine form of LEONIDAS.
LÉONNE f French (Rare)
Feminine form of LÉON.
LEONTI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Леонтий (see LEONTIY).
LEONTINA f Italian, Late Roman
Feminine form of LEONTIUS.
LÉONTINE f French
French form of LEONTINA.
LEONTIOS m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". This was the name of various early saints and martyrs. It was also borne by a 7th-century Byzantine emperor.
LEONTIY m Russian
Russian form of LEONTIOS.
LEONTY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Леонтий (see LEONTIY).
LEONTYNE f English (Rare)
Variant of LÉONTINE. This name was borne by opera singer Leontyne Price (1927-).
LEONZIO m Italian
Italian form of LEONTIOS.
LÉOPOLD m French
French form of LEOPOLD.
LEOPOLD m German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1920).
LÉOPOLDINE f French
French feminine form of LEOPOLD.
LEOPOLDO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEOPOLD.
LEOŠ m Czech
Czech form of LEO.
LEUDBALD m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LEOPOLD.
LEV (1) m Russian
Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).
LEVAN m Georgian
Georgian form of LEON.
LEVON m Armenian
Armenian form of LEON. This was the name of several kings of Cilician Armenia, including the first king Levon I the Magnificent.
LEW (2) m Polish
Polish cognate of LEV (1).
LEWELLA f Welsh
Variant of LLEWELLA.
LINNET f English (Rare)
Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.
LIONEL m French, English
French diminutive of LÉON. A notable bearer is Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi (1987-).
LISSA f English
Short form of MELISSA.
LIUPOLD m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LEOPOLD.
LLEW m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of LLEU. It can also be a short form of LLEWELYN. It coincides with the Welsh word llew meaning "lion".
LLEWELLA f Welsh
Feminine form of LLYWELYN.
LLEWELLYN m Welsh
Variant of LLEWELYN.
LLEWELYN m Welsh
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by the Welsh word llew "lion".
LLINOS f Welsh
Means "linnet, finch" in Welsh. The linnet (species Linaria cannabina) is a small European bird in the finch family.
LLYWELYN m Welsh
Possibly a Welsh form of the old Celtic name Lugubelenus, a combination of the names of the gods LUGUS and BELENUS. Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against England.
LÓEGAIRE m Irish Mythology, Ancient Irish
Means "calf herder", derived from Irish loagh "calf". In Irish mythology Lóegaire Búadach was an Ulster warrior. He saved the life of the poet Áed, but died in the process. This was also the name of several Irish high kings.
LONÁN m Irish
Means "little blackbird", derived from Irish Gaelic lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix.
LOWELL m English
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
LUITPOLD m German (Rare)
German variant of LEOPOLD.
LUPE f & m Spanish
Short form of GUADALUPE.
LUPITA f Spanish
Diminutive of GUADALUPE.
LYOV m Russian (Rare)
Diminutive of LEV (1).
MADHUKAR m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "bee, honey-maker" in Sanskrit.
MAHA f Arabic
Means "oryx" in Arabic. The oryx is a variety of antelope that is said to represent beauty.
MARAL f Azerbaijani, Armenian
Means "deer" in Azerbaijani and Armenian, referring to the Caspian Red Deer, derived from Persian مرال (maral).
MARDUK m Semitic Mythology
Probably from Sumerian amar-Utuk meaning "calf of Utu", derived from amar combined with the name of the sun god UTU. This was the name of the chief Babylonian god, presiding over heaven, light, sky, battle, and fertility. After killing the dragon Tiamat, who was an old enemy of the gods, he created the world and sky from the pieces of her body.
MARE f Estonian, Slovene, Macedonian, Croatian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with Mar.
MARLIN m English
Possibly a variant of MERLIN.
MARTEN m Dutch
Dutch form of Martinus (see MARTIN).
MARTIN m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATH m Welsh Mythology
Possibly from Celtic matu meaning "bear". According to the Mabinogion, Math ap Mathonwy was a king of Gwynedd and a magician. He was the uncle of the hero Gwydion.
MATHGHAMHAIN m Ancient Irish
Means "bear" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a brother of the Irish king Brian Boru.
MAVIS f English
From the name of the type of bird, also called the song thrush, derived from Old French mauvis, of uncertain origin. It was first used as a given name by the British author Marie Corelli, who used it for a character in her novel The Sorrows of Satan (1895).
MAYUR m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "peacock" in Sanskrit.
MEENA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi मीना or Tamil மீனா (see MINA (2)).
MELANTHA f English (Rare)
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the suffix antha (from Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play Marriage a la Mode (1672).
MELANTHIOS m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μελας (melas) meaning "black, dark" and ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of an insolent goatherd killed by Odysseus.
MELIKA f Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of MELISSA.
MELINA f English, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MELINDA f English, Hungarian
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play Bánk Bán by József Katona.
MELİS f Turkish
Turkish form of MELISSA.
MELİSA f Turkish
Turkish form of MELISSA.
MELISA f Spanish, Bosnian
Spanish and Bosnian form of MELISSA.
MÉLISSA f French
French form of MELISSA.
MELISSA f English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a daughter of Procles, as well as an epithet of various Greek nymphs and priestesses. According to the early Christian writer Lactantius this was the name of the sister of the nymph Amalthea, with whom she cared for the young Zeus. Later it appears in Ludovico Ariosto's poem Orlando Furios (1516) belonging to the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina. As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELITTA f Ancient Greek, German
Ancient Attic Greek variant of MELISSA.
MEREL f Dutch
Means "blackbird" in Dutch.
MERLE f & m English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERLIN m Arthurian Romance, English
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".... [more]
MICKEY m & f English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MINA (2) f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Means "fish" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu goddess Ushas as well as the daughter of the god Kubera.
MINAKSHI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit मीन (mina) meaning "fish" and अक्षि (akshi) meaning "eye". This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
MINALI f Indian, Hindi
Means "fish catcher" in Sanskrit.
MINDY f English
Diminutive of MELINDA.
MISSIE f English
Diminutive of MELISSA.
MISSY f English
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".
NAGENDRA m Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Means "lord of snakes" from Sanskrit नाग (naga) meaning "snake" (also "elephant") combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for Vasuki, the king of snakes, in Hindu mythology.
NAHUEL m Native American, Mapuche
Means "jaguar" in Mapuche.
NENSI f Croatian
Croatian form of NANCY.
NES f Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AGNES.
NESKE f Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish diminutive of AGNES.
NEST f Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTA f Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NEWT m English
Short form of NEWTON.
NEŽA f Slovene
Slovene form of AGNES.
NINSUN f Sumerian Mythology
From Sumerian nin-sumun-a(k) meaning "lady of the wild cow", derived from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒄢 (sumun) meaning "wild cow". In Sumerian mythology Ninsun was the divine mother of Gilgamesh.
NITA (2) f Native American, Choctaw
Means "bear" in Choctaw.
NÖL m Limburgish
Limburgish short form of ARNOLD.
NÖLKE m Limburgish
Limburgish diminutive of ARNOLD.
OANEZ f Breton
Derived from Breton oan "lamb" (ultimately from Latin agnus) and used as a Breton form of AGNES.
ODDBJØRN m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Oddbjǫrn, derived from the elements oddr "point of a sword" and bjǫrn "bear".
OFER m Hebrew
Means "fawn" in Hebrew. This makes it a modern variant of the Classical Hebrew name Ophrah.
OFRA m & f Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of OPHRAH. Originally it was a masculine name, but it is now used for females too.
'OFRAH m Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of OPHRAH.
OISÍN m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
ONFROI m Medieval French
Norman French form of HUMPHREY.
OONA f Irish, Finnish
Irish variant and Finnish form of ÚNA.
OONAGH f Irish
Variant of ÚNA.
OPHRAH m Biblical
Means "fawn" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a man mentioned in genealogies and a city in Manasseh.
ORSINA f Italian
Feminine form of ORSINO.
ORSINO m Italian
Italian form of the Roman name Ursinus, itself derived from Ursus (see URS). This is the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night (1602).
ORSO m Italian
Italian form of Ursus (see URS).
ORSOLA f Italian
Italian form of URSULA.
ORSOLYA f Hungarian
Hungarian form of URSULA.
ORSON m English
From a Norman nickname derived from a diminutive of Norman French ors "bear", ultimately from Latin ursus. American actor and director Orson Welles (1915-1985) was a famous bearer of this name.
OSAMA m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic أسامة (see USAMA).
OSBORN m English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjǫrn used in England, and after the Norman Conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSMAN m Turkish, Kurdish
Turkish and Kurdish form of UTHMAN. This was the name of the founder of the Ottoman Empire (14th century).
OTHNIEL m Biblical
Meaning uncertain, possibly "lion of God" or "strength of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a nephew of Caleb who becomes the first of the ruling judges of the Israelites.
OTSO m Finnish
Means "bear" in Finnish.
OVID m History
From the Roman family name Ovidius, which was possibly derived from Latin ovis "a sheep". Alternatively, it could have a Sabellic origin. Publius Ovidius Naso, better known as Ovid, was a 1st-century BC Roman poet who often wrote on the subjects of love and mythology. He was sent into exile by Emperor Augustus for no apparent reason.
PALOMA f Spanish
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
PAN m Greek Mythology
Possibly from an Indo-European root meaning "shepherd, protector". In Greek mythology Pan was a half-man, half-goat god associated with shepherds, flocks and pastures.
PANTALEON m Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements παν (pan) meaning "all" (genitive παντος) and λεων (leon) meaning "lion". This was the name of a 2nd-century BC king of Bactria. It was also borne by Saint Pantaleon (also called Panteleimon), a doctor from Asia Minor who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century. He is a patron saint of doctors and midwives.
PANTALEONE m Italian
Italian form of PANTALEON.
PANTHER m Ancient Greek
Means "panther" in Greek.
PARASTOO f Persian
Means "swallow (bird)" in Persian.
PARASTU f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian پرستو (see PARASTOO).
PARVANA f Azerbaijani, Persian
Alternate transcription of Azerbaijani PƏRVANƏ or Persian پروانه (see PARVANEH).
PARVANEH f Persian
Means "butterfly" in Persian.
PASTOR m Spanish, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name meaning "shepherd". This was the name of at least three saints.
PËLLUMB m Albanian
Means "dove" in Albanian.
PENELOPE f Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) meaning "threads, weft" and οψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PERDITA f Literature
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play The Winter's Tale (1610).
PEREGRINE m English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PHILIP m English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
PHILOMEL f Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
PHILOMELA f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) meaning "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) meaning "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PHINEAS m Biblical
Variant of PHINEHAS used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
PHINEHAS m Biblical
Probably means "Nubian" from the Egyptian name Panhsj, though some believe it means "serpent's mouth" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Phinehas is a grandson of Aaron who kills an Israelite because he is intimate with a Midianite woman, thus stopping a plague sent by God. Also in the Bible this is the son of Eli, killed in battle with the Philistines.
PHOCAS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φωκας (Phokas), which meant "seal (animal)" from Greek φωκη (phoke). This was the name of an early saint and martyr from Asia Minor. Sentenced to death for being a Christian, he is said to have given his killers lodging and then dug his own grave before he was executed.
POLDI m German
German diminutive of LEOPOLD.
PORTIA f English
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearean character.
POSEIDON m Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek ποσις (posis) meaning "husband, lord" and δα (da) meaning "earth". The name first appears in Mycenaean Greek inscriptions as po-se-da-o. In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.
QUETZALCOATL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
RABAN m Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic byname derived from hraban meaning "raven".
RACHEL f English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob. Jacob was tricked by her father Laban into marrying her older sister Leah first, though in exchange for seven years of work Laban allowed Jacob to marry Rachel too. Initially barren and facing her husband's anger, she offered her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob to bear him children. Eventually she was herself able to conceive, becoming the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.... [more]
RALEIGH m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English. A city in North Carolina bears this name, after the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618).
RAMBERT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hramn "raven" and beraht "bright".
RASHA f Arabic
Means "young gazelle" in Arabic.
RAVEN f & m English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RAVENNA f English (Rare)
Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
RAY m English
Short form of RAYMOND, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
RENARD m French (Rare)
French form of REYNARD. Because of the medieval character Reynard the Fox, renard became a French word meaning "fox".
REYNARD m English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
RHEA f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ερα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RIM f Arabic
Means "white antelope" in Arabic.
ROAN m Frisian
Variant of RONNE.
ROBENA f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ROBIN.
ROBIN m & f English, French, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROBINA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of ROBIN. It originated in Scotland in the 17th century.