Names Categorized "animals"

This is a list of names in which the categories include animals.
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AARNE m Finnish
Finnish form of ARNE (1).
AART m Dutch
Dutch short form of ARNOLD.
ABELONE f Danish
Danish form of APOLLONIA.
ADALBERN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and bern "bear".
ADERYN f Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AETIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was probably derived from Greek ἀετός (aetos) meaning "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
AGE (2) f Estonian
Estonian form of AGNES.
AGGIE f English
Diminutive of AGNES or AGATHA.
AGHAVNI f Armenian
Means "dove" in Armenian.
ÁGI f Hungarian
Diminutive of ÁGOTA or ÁGNES.
AGILULF m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
AGNĖ f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of AGNES.
ÁGNES f Hungarian
Hungarian form of AGNES.
AGNÈS f French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AGNES f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
AGNESA f Slovak, Albanian
Slovak and Albanian form of AGNES.
AGNESE f Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGNESSA f Russian
Russian form of AGNES.
AGNETA f Swedish
Swedish variant of AGNES.
AGNETE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AGNEZA f Croatian
Croatian form of AGNES.
AGNIESZKA f Polish
Polish form of AGNES.
AGNIJA f Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGRIPPA m & f Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from a combination of Greek ἄγριος (agrios) meaning "wild" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" or alternatively of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AHTI m Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
AIGNÉIS f Irish
Irish form of AGNES.
AINARA f Basque, Spanish
Variant of ENARA.
ÁKOS m Hungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
ALCIPPE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ἀλκίππη (Alkippe), derived from ἀλκή (alke) meaning "strength" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCYONE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀλκυόνη (Alkyone), derived from the word ἀλκυών (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ALFBERN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and bern "bear".
ALKYONE f Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of ALCYONE.
ALONDRA f Spanish
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
ALPARSLAN m Turkish
From Turkish alp meaning "brave" and arslan meaning "lion", referring to the 11th-century Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan, who expanded the Seljuk Empire into Anatolia.
ALTAIR m Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
AMALTHEA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἀμάλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθάσσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a nymph (in some sources a goat) who nursed the infant Zeus.
ANDOR (1) m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnþórr, derived from the element arn "eagle" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
ANDROCLES m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀνδροκλῆς (Androkles) meaning "glory of a man", derived from ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a man who pulled a thorn from a lion's paw in one of Aesop's fables.
ANE (2) m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANGUS m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANNE (2) m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANNICE f English
Variant of ANNIS.
ANNIS f English
Medieval English form of AGNES.
ANTIMAN m Native American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
ANTINANCO m Native American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche.
APOLENA f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of APOLLONIA.
APOLINAR m Spanish
Spanish form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLLINAIRE m French (Rare)
French form of APOLLINARIS. It was adopted as a surname by the Polish-French poet Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918), who based it on his Polish middle name Apolinary.
APOLLINARIS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from the name of the god APOLLO. This was the name of several early saints and martyrs, including a bishop of Ravenna and a bishop of Hierapolis.
APOLLINE f French
French form of APOLLONIA.
APOLLO m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ἀπόλλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo meaning "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb ἀπόλλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
APOLLONIA f Ancient Greek, Italian
Feminine form of APOLLONIOS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
APOLLONIOS m Ancient Greek
From an ancient Greek personal name that was derived from the name of the Greek god APOLLO. It was borne by a Greek poet of the 3rd century BC. Several saints have also had this name.
APOLÓNIA f Portuguese (European)
European Portuguese form of APOLLONIA.
APOLÔNIA f Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of APOLLONIA.
APOLONIA f Spanish, Polish
Spanish and Polish form of APOLLONIA.
APOLONIJA f Slovene
Slovene form of APOLLONIA.
AQISSIAQ m Native American, Greenlandic
Means "ptarmigan" in Greenlandic (a ptarmigan is a type of bird that lives in cold regions).
AQUILA m & f Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
AQUILINA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AQUILINUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Byblos.
AQUILINUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of AQUILA.
ARACHNE f Greek Mythology
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
ARAS m Lithuanian
Means "eagle" in Lithuanian (a poetic word).
ARELI m Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
AREND m Dutch, German
Dutch and German variant of ARNOLD. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
ARI (1) m Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARI (2) m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
ARIE (2) m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אַרְיֵה (see ARIEH).
ARIEH m Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew. This is the name of an officer of King Pekahiah in the Old Testament.
'ARI'EL m Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of ARIEL.
ARIEL m & f Hebrew, English, French, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play The Tempest (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film The Little Mermaid (1989).
ARIELLA f English (Modern)
Strictly feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIELLE f French
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIES m Roman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
ARIHEL m Biblical Latin
Latin form of ARIEL.
ARIK m Hebrew
Diminutive of ARIEL or ARIEH.
ARKADIOS m Ancient Greek
From an ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia". Arcadia was a region in Greece, its name deriving from ἄρκτος (arktos) meaning "bear". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr.
ARKE m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
ARLIE f & m English
Diminutive of ARLINE and other names beginning with Arl.
ARMEL m Breton, French
Breton and French form of the Brythonic name Arthmael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince, chieftain". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARN m English
Short form of ARNOLD.
ARNALDO m Italian
Italian form of ARNOLD.
ARNAU m Catalan
Catalan form of ARNOLD.
ARNAUD m French
French form of ARNOLD.
ARNAUDE f French (Rare)
French feminine form of ARNOLD.
ARNBJÖRG f Icelandic
Icelandic form of ARNBJǪRG.
ARNBORG f Swedish (Rare)
Swedish form of ARNBJǪRG.
ARNDT m German
German short form of ARNOLD.
ARNE (1) m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
ARNE (2) m German
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNFINN m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arnfinnr, which was derived from the elements arn "eagle" and finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
ARNFRIED m German (Rare)
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
ÁRNI m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ARNE (1).
ARNIE m English
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNIFRID m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ARNFRIED.
ARNO m Dutch, German
Short form of ARNOUD or ARNOLD.
ARNOLD m English, German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARNOLFO m Italian
Italian form of ARNULF.
ARNÓR m Icelandic
Icelandic variant form of ANDOR (1).
ARNOUD m Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNOUT m Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNT m Norwegian
Norwegian form of AREND.
ARNÞÓR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of ANDOR (1).
ARNULF m German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wulf "wolf".
ARNVIÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ARVID.
ARSLAN m Turkish, Turkmen
Turkish variant and Turkmen form of ASLAN.
ARTHFAEL m Medieval Welsh
Welsh form of ARMEL.
ARTHUR m English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.... [more]
ARVID m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ARWA f Arabic
Possibly means "mountain goats" in Arabic. This name was borne by some relatives of the Prophet Muhammad. It was also the name of a 12th-century queen of Yemen.
ARYEH m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אַרְיֵה (see ARIEH).
ASAD m Arabic, Urdu
Means "lion" in Arabic.
ÁSBJÖRN m Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÁSBJǪRN.
ÁSBJǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and bjǫrn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASBJØRN m Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish form of ÁSBJǪRN.
ASHWIN m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit अश्विन् (ashvin) meaning "possessed of horses". The Ashvins are twin Hindu gods of the sunrise and sunset.
ASLAN m Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
ASLANBEK m Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Derived from Turkish aslan meaning "lion" combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
ASTOR m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
ASUKA f & m Japanese
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
ATHAULF m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from atta "father" and wulf "wolf". This was the name of a 5th-century king of the Visigoths.
AUCAMAN m Native American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche.
AUNE f Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
AVA (3) f German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
AVERILL m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVEZA f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of AVIS.
AVI m Hebrew
Means "my father" in Hebrew. It is also a diminutive of AVRAHAM or AVIRAM.
AVIS f English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AYAL m Hebrew
Means "stag, male deer" in Hebrew.
AYALA f Hebrew
Means "doe, female deer" in Hebrew.
AYELET f Hebrew
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
BABAR m Urdu
Alternate transcription of Urdu بابر (see BABUR).
BABUR m Urdu
From a Persian word meaning "tiger". This was the nickname of Zahir ud-Din Muhammad, the 16th-century founder of the Mughal Empire in India.
BADULF m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements badu "fight, struggle" and wulf "wolf".
BAKR m Arabic
Means "young camel" in Arabic. Abu Bakr was a father-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad and the first caliph of the Muslim world.
BAST f Egyptian Mythology
Possibly means "fire, heat" or "ointment jar" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BASTET f Egyptian Mythology
Variant of BAST. This form of the name, a diminutive, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
BECKETT m English (Modern)
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BEE f English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BEN (2) m Dutch
Short form of BERNHARD and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
BENNO m German
Short form of German names containing the element bern "bear".
BEOWULF m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BER m Yiddish
Means "bear" in Yiddish, a vernacular form of Dov.
BERAHTHRABAN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM, using an extended form of the second element.
BERAHTHRAM m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM.
BERARD m Ancient Germanic
Variant of BERNARD using the related root bero "bear" as the first element. This was the name of a 13th-century saint who was martyred in Morocco.
BERENDINA f Dutch
Feminine form of BERNHARD.
BERENGAR m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements bern "bear" and ger "spear". This was the name of two medieval kings of Italy and a Holy Roman emperor.
BERNADETT f Hungarian
Hungarian form of BERNADETTE.
BERNADINE f English
Feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDA f Slovene, Croatian, Spanish
Feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDETTA f Italian
Italian feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDINA f Italian
Italian feminine diminutive of BERNARDO.
BERNARDINE f French (Rare)
French feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDITA f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of BERNARD.
BERNHARD m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERTRAM m English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play All's Well That Ends Well (1603).
BEVERLY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark.
BIA f Portuguese
Diminutive of BEATRIZ.
BIBIGUL f Kazakh
Means "nightingale" in Kazakh.
BIRDIE f English
Diminutive of BERTHA, BERNICE or other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
BJARNE m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of BJARNI.
BJARNI m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse diminutive of BJǪRN and other names containing the element bjǫrn meaning "bear".
BJÖRN m Swedish, Icelandic, German
From an Old Norse byname derived from bjǫrn meaning "bear".
BJǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BJÖRN.
BLEDDYN m Welsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
BORIS m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRADÁN m Ancient Irish
Means "salmon" in Irish.
BRAN (1) m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2) m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANWEN f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh brân "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRENNUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRENO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
BROCK m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BUCK m English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUĞRA m Turkish
Means "baby camel" in Turkish.
BUNNY f English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURÇİN f & m Turkish
Means "hind, doe" in Turkish.
CAILEAN m Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALEB m English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
CALLUM m Scottish
Variant of CALUM.
CALUM m Scottish
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAT f & m English
Diminutive of CATHERINE. It can also be a nickname from the English word for the animal.
CELANDINE f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CEREN f Turkish
Means "young gazelle" in Turkish.
CEYLAN f Turkish
Means "gazelle" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
CHALEB m Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of CALEB used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
CHO f Japanese (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji (see CHŌ).
CHOU f Japanese (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji (see CHŌ).
CHOUKO f Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 蝶子 (see CHŌKO).
CIRCE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κίρκη (Kirke), possibly from κίρκος (kirkos) meaning "hawk". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs, as told in Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus forced her to change them back, then stayed with her for a year before continuing his voyage.
CLARK m English
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec originally meaning "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLOVER f English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COLIN (1) m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLM m Irish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁN m Irish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLOMBA f Italian
Italian feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBANO m Italian
Italian form of COLUMBANUS.
COLOMBE f French
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBINA f Italian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
COLOMBO m Italian
Italian form of COLUMBA.
COLT m English
From the English word for a young male horse or from the surname of the same origin. It may be given in honour of the American industrialist Samuel Colt (1814-1862) or the firearms company that bears his name.
COLUM m Irish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBA m & f Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBAN m Irish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUS m Late Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
COLUMBINE f English (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
CONALL m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Irish. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CONAN m Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
CONOR m Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Conchobar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CORAL f English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοράλλιον (korallion).
CORBIN m English
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
CORMAC m Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
CORMAG m Scottish
Scottish form of CORMAC.
CORNEL m Romanian
Romanian form of CORNELIUS.
CRAWFORD m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CSABA m Hungarian
Possibly means either "shepherd" or "gift" in Hungarian. According to legend this was the name of a son of Attila the Hun.
CUÁN m Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from the Irish element meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CUAUHTÉMOC m Native American, Nahuatl
Means "descending eagle" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the last Aztec emperor, ruling until he was captured and executed by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the year 1525.
CÚCHULAINN m Irish Mythology
Means "hound of Culann" in Irish. This was the usual name of the warrior hero who was named Sétanta at birth, given to him because he took the place of one of Culann's hounds after he accidentally killed it. Irish legend tells of Cúchulainn's many adventures, including his single-handed defense of Ulster against the army of Queen Medb.
CULHWCH m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "hiding place of the pig" in Welsh. In Welsh legend he was the lover of Olwen the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Before the giant would allow Culhwch to marry his daughter, he insisted that Culhwch complete a series of extremely difficult tasks. Culhwch managed to complete them, and he returned to marry Olwen and kill the giant. This tale appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
CUNOBELINUS m Ancient Celtic
Possibly means "hound of Belenus" from the old Celtic element koun "hound" combined with the name of the god BELENUS. This was the name of a 1st-century king of southeast Britain.
CYMBELINE m Literature
Form of CUNOBELINUS used by Shakespeare in his play Cymbeline (1609).
DAGON m Semitic Mythology
Perhaps related to Ugaritic dgn meaning "grain". This was the name of a Semitic god of agriculture, usually depicted with the body of a fish.
DAMARIS f Biblical, Biblical Greek
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δάμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
DAMHÁN m Irish
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DAMHNAIT f Irish
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DARBY m & f English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DEB f English
Short form of DEBORAH.
DEBBI f English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBBIE f English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBBORA f Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of DEBORAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DEBBY f English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBI f English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DÉBORA f Spanish, Portuguese, French
Spanish, Portuguese and French form of DEBORAH.
DEBORA f Italian, German, Dutch
Italian, German and Dutch form of DEBORAH.
DEBORAH f English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name דְּבוֹרָה (Devorah) meaning "bee". In the Old Testament Book of Judges, Deborah is a heroine and prophetess who leads the Israelites when they are threatened by the Canaanites. She forms an army under the command of Barak, and together they destroy the army of the Canaanite commander Sisera. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of the nurse of Rebecca.... [more]
DEBRA f English
Variant of DEBORAH.
DEROR m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew דְּרוֹר (see DROR).
DERORIT f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew דְּרוֹרִית (see DRORIT).
DERYN f Welsh
Possibly from Welsh aderyn meaning "bird".
DEVNET f Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT.
DONALD m Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Domhnall meaning "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).
DORCAS f Biblical
Derived from Greek δορκάς (dorkas) meaning "gazelle". This is the Greek translation of the name Tabitha in the New Testament (see Acts 9:36).
DOV m Hebrew
Means "bear" in Hebrew.
DOVE f English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
DRACO m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δράκων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRAKE m English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
DRAKON m Ancient Greek
Greek form of DRACO.
DREN m Albanian
From Albanian dre meaning "deer".
DROR m Hebrew
Means "freedom" or "sparrow" in Hebrew.
DRORIT f Hebrew
Feminine form of DROR.
DVORAH f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew דְּבוֹרָה (see DEVORAH).
DYMPHNA f Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who was martyred by her father. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
DYMPNA f Irish
Variant of DYMPHNA.
EACHANN m Scottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EADWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman Conquest.
ÉANNA m Irish
Variant of ÉNNA.
EBERARDO m Spanish (Rare)
Spanish form of EVERARD.
ELAIN f Welsh
Means "fawn" in Welsh.
ENARA f Basque
Means "swallow (bird)" in Basque.
ENDA m Irish
Anglicized form of ÉNNA.
ENGUERRAND m Medieval French
Medieval French form of the Germanic name Engilram, which was composed of the elements angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and hramn "raven". This was the name of several French nobles from Picardy.
ENIKŐ f Hungarian
Created by the Hungarian poet Mihály Vörösmarty in the 19th century. He based it on the name of the legendary mother of the Hungarian people, Enéh, which may mean "cow" or "deer".
ÉNNA m Irish
Possibly means "bird-like" in Irish. This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany.
EOFORHILD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
EOFORWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ÉOWYN f Literature
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
EPONA f Celtic Mythology
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ERDOĞAN m Turkish
From Turkish er "brave man" and doğan "falcon".
ERLEA f Basque
Means "bee" in Basque.
ÉTAÍN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét meaning "jealousy". In Irish mythology she is the subject of the 9th-century tale The Wooing of Étaín. She was the wife of Midir, but his jealous first wife Fuamnach transformed her into a fly. She was accidentally swallowed, and then reborn to the woman who swallowed her. After she grew again to adulthood she married the Irish high king Eochaid Airem, having no memory of Midir. Midir and Étaín were eventually reunited after Midir defeated Eochaid in a game of chess.
ETHELINDA f English (Archaic)
English form of the Germanic name ADALLINDIS. The name was very rare in medieval times, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
EUROPA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Εὐρώπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.
EVERARD m English (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
EVERILD f History
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
EVERLY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was from a place name, itself derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ÉVRARD m French
French form of EVERARD.
EZIO m Italian
Italian form of AETIUS.
FAIGA f Yiddish
Variant of FAIGEL.