Classical Latin Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Classical Latin. Latin was the language spoken in ancient Rome and many parts of the Roman Empire.
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CILLAfSwedish, Dutch
Diminutive of CECILIA.
CILLEfDanish
Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
CIPRIANmRomanian
Romanian form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CIPRIANOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CISSYfEnglish
Variant of SISSY.
CLAIRmFrench, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAIREfFrench, English
French form of CLARA.
CLARAfItalian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLAREfEnglish
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLARETTAfItalian
Diminutive of CLARA.
CLARIBELfEnglish
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix bel. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (in the form Claribell) and by Shakespeare in his play 'The Tempest' (1611). Alfred Lord Tennyson also wrote a poem entitled 'Claribel' (1830).
CLARICEfEnglish
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CLARINDAfEnglish
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix inda. It was first used by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
CLARISAfSpanish
Spanish variant of CLARISSA.
CLARISSAfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLARISSEfFrench
French form of CLARICE.
CLARITIAfLate Roman
Possibly a derivative of CLARA.
CLARKmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLARUSmLate Roman
Masculine Latin form of CLARA. This was the name of several early saints.
CLAUDmEnglish
Variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDEm & fFrench, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLAUDETTEfFrench
French feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLÁUDIAfPortuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLÀUDIAfCatalan
Catalan feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLAUDIEfFrench
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDINEfFrench
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLÁUDIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIUmRomanian
Romanian form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.
CLELIAfItalian
Italian form of CLOELIA.
CLEMmEnglish
Short form of CLEMENT.
CLÉMENCEfFrench
French feminine form of Clementius (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENCEfEnglish
Feminine form of Clementius (see CLEMENT). It has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became rare after the 17th century.
CLEMENCYfEnglish (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CLEMENSmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
CLÉMENTmFrench
French form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENTmEnglish
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius) which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLEMENTEmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENTIAfLate Roman
Feminine form of Clemens or Clementius (see CLEMENT).
CLÉMENTINEfFrench
French feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLEMENTIUSmLate Roman
Derivative of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLÍMACOmSpanish
Spanish form of Climacus, derived from Greek κλιμαξ (klimax) "ladder". The 7th-century monk Saint John Climacus (also known as John of the Ladder) acquired this name because he wrote a book called 'The Ladder of Divine Ascent'.
CLIMENTmCatalan
Catalan form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLOELIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of CLOELIUS. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.
CLOELIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning.
CNAEUSmAncient Roman
Roman variant of GNAEUS.
COKKIEfDutch
Dutch diminutive of CORNELIA.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLMmIrish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁNmIrish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLOMBAfItalian
Italian feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBANOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBANUS.
COLOMBEfFrench
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBINAfItalian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
COLOMBOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBA.
COLUMmIrish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBAm & fLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBANmIrish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUSmLate Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
COLUMBINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
CONCEPCIÓNfSpanish
Means "conception" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. A city in Chile bears this name.
CONCEPTAfIrish
Latinate form of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCETTAfItalian
Italian cognate of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCETTOmItalian
Masculine form of CONCETTA.
CONCHAfSpanish
Diminutive of CONCEPCIÓN. This name can also mean "seashell" in Spanish.
CONCHITAfSpanish
Diminutive of CONCHA.
CONCORDIAfRoman Mythology
Means "harmony" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of harmony and peace.
CONNIEf & mEnglish
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CONSTANÇAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSTANCEfEnglish, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CONSTÂNCIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSTANSmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "constant, steadfast". This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor, a son of Constantine the Great.
CONSTANTmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CONSTANȚAfRomanian
Romanian form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSTANTIAfLate Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Constantius, which was itself derived from CONSTANS.
CONSTANTIJNmDutch
Dutch form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CONSTANTINmRomanian, French
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CONSTANTINAfLate Roman
Feminine form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CONSTANTINEmHistory
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
CONSTANTIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name which was a derivative of CONSTANS.
CONSTANZAfSpanish
Spanish form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSTANZEfGerman
German form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSUSmRoman Mythology
Possibly derived from Latin conserere meaning "to sow, to plant". Consus was a Roman god of the harvest and grain.
CORAfEnglish, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORALfEnglish, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORALIEfFrench
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORNÉmDutch
Diminutive of CORNELIS.
CORNELmRomanian
Romanian form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIAfGerman, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORNÉLIEfFrench
French form of CORNELIA.
CORNÉLIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELISmDutch
Dutch form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIUmRomanian
Romanian form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIUSmAncient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORNELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORONAfLate Roman, Italian, Spanish
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
CORRIEfEnglish, Dutch
Diminutive of CORINNA, CORA, CORNELIA and other names starting with Cor. Since the 1970s it has also been used as a feminine form of COREY.
COSTACHEmRomanian
Romanian variant of CONSTANTIN.
COSTANTINOmItalian
Italian form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
COSTANZOmItalian
Italian form of CONSTANS.
COSTELmRomanian
Romanian diminutive of CONSTANTIN.
COSTICĂmRomanian
Romanian diminutive of CONSTANTIN.
COSTINmRomanian
Romanian short form of CONSTANTIN.
CRESCENCIAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
CRESCENSmLate Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin name which was derived from crescere "to grow". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament.
CRESCENTIUSmLate Roman
Latin name which was a derivative of the name CRESCENS. Saint Crescentius was a child martyred in Rome during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
CRESCENZOmItalian
Italian form of CRESCENTIUS.
CRISPIANmEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval variant of CRISPIN.
CRISPINmEnglish (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
CRISPUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "curly-haired" in Latin.
CRISTImRomanian
Diminutive of CRISTIAN.
CRISTIÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of CHRISTIAN.
CRISTIANmRomanian
Romanian form of CHRISTIAN.
CRISTIANAfItalian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTINA.
CRISTIANOmItalian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTIAN. A famous bearer is Portuguese soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo (1985-).
CRISTINAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Romanian form of CHRISTINA.
CRUZf & mSpanish, Portuguese
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.
CRUZITAfSpanish
Diminutive of CRUZ.
CRYSTINfWelsh
Welsh form of CHRISTINE.
CULLENmEnglish
From a surname, either CULLEN (1) or CULLEN (2).
CUPIDmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Cupido meaning "desire". This was the name of the Roman god of love, the son of Venus and Mars. He was portrayed as a winged, blindfolded boy, armed with a bow and arrows which caused the victim to fall in love. His Greek equivalent was Eros.
CURROmSpanish
Andalusian diminutive of FRANCISCO.
CUSTÓDIAfPortuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTODIAfSpanish
Feminine form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTÓDIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTODIOmSpanish
Means "guardian" in Spanish, from Latin custodia "protection, safekeeping".
CYPRIANmPolish, English (Rare)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus which meant "from Cyprus" in Latin. Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
CYPRIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of CYPRIAN.
CYPRIENmFrench
French form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
DAJANAfSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of DIANA.
DANTEmItalian
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the 'Divine Comedy'.
DAVINmEnglish
Possibly a variant of DEVIN influenced by DAVID.
DEANAfEnglish
Variant of DEANNA.
DEANGELOmAfrican American
Combination of the popular name prefix De and ANGELO.
DEANNAfEnglish
Either a variant of DIANA or a feminine form of DEAN. This name was popularized by the Canadian actress and singer Deanna Durbin (1921-), whose birth name was Edna. Her stage name was a rearrangement of the letters of her real name.
DEANNEfEnglish
Variant of DEANNA.
DECIMAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of DECIMUS.
DECIMUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "tenth" in Latin.
DEEANNfEnglish
Variant of DEANNA.
DEENAfEnglish
Variant of DEANNA.
DEFORESTmEnglish
From a French surname meaning "from the forest". It was originally given in honour of American author John Deforest (1826-1906).
DELANEYfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DELFINAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of DELPHINA.
DELORAfEnglish
Altered form of DOLORES.
DELPHINAfLate Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Delphinus, which meant "of Delphi". Delphi was a city in ancient Greece, the name of which is possibly related to Greek δελφυς (delphys) "womb". The Blessed Delphina was a 14th-century Provençal nun.
DELPHINEfFrench
French form of DELPHINA.
DELPHINUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of DELPHINA. Saint Delphinus was a 4th-century bishop of Bordeaux.
DENAfEnglish
Possibly a short form of names ending with dena. It has also been used as a variant of DEANNA.
DÉODATmFrench
French form of DEODATUS.
DEODATOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of DEODATUS.
DEODATUSmLate Roman
Variant of ADEODATUS or DEUSDEDIT. This name was borne by several saints.
DESImSpanish
Diminutive of DESIDERIO.
DESIDERATUSmLate Roman
Derived from Latin desideratum meaning "desired". This was the name of a 6th-century French saint.
DESIDÉRIAfPortuguese (Rare)
Portuguese feminine form of DESIDERIO.
DESIDERIAfItalian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
DESIDÉRIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of DESIDERIO.
DESIDERIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of DESIDERIUS.
DESIDERIUSmLate Roman
Derived from Latin desiderium "longing, desire". It was the name of several early saints. It was also borne in the 8th century by the last king of the Lombard Kingdom.
DÉSIRÉmFrench
Masculine form of DÉSIRÉE.
DÉSIRÉEfFrench
French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".
DESIREEfEnglish
English form of DÉSIRÉE. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the movie 'Désirée' (1954).
DEUSDEDITmLate Roman
Latin name meaning "God has given". This was the name of two popes (who are also known by the related name Adeodatus).
DEVINm & fEnglish, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DEVONm & fEnglish
Variant of DEVIN. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.
DEZSŐmHungarian
Hungarian form of Desiderius (see DESIDERIO).
DIfEnglish
Short form of DIANA.
DIÁNAfHungarian
Hungarian form of DIANA.
DIĀNAfLatvian
Latvian form of DIANA.
DIANAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DIANEfFrench, English
French form of DIANA, also regularly used in the English-speaking world.
DIANNfEnglish
Variant of DIANE.
DIANNAfEnglish
Variant of DIANA.
DÍDACmCatalan
Catalan form of DIDACUS.
DIDACUSmMedieval Spanish
Form of DIEGO found in medieval Latin records.
DIDIERmFrench
French form of DESIDERIO.
DIDOfRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly "virgin" in Phoenician. Dido, also called Elissa, was the queen of Carthage in Virgil's 'Aeneid'. She burned herself to death after Aeneas left her.
DIEGOmSpanish
Possibly a shortened form of SANTIAGO. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχη (didache) "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).
DIEUDONNÉmFrench
Means "given by God" in French, used as a French form of DEUSDEDIT.
DIEUDONNÉEfFrench
Feminine form of DIEUDONNÉ.
DIJANAfCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Southern Slavic form of DIANA.
DINA (2)fItalian, Portuguese
Short form of names ending in dina.
DINKOmCroatian
Croatian diminutive of DOMINIC.
DINOmItalian, Croatian
Short form of names ending in dino or tino.
DINUmRomanian
Romanian diminutive of CONSTANTIN.
DIODATOmItalian
Italian form of DEODATUS.
DIOGOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of DIEGO. This name was borne by the 15th-century Portuguese explorer Diogo Cão.
DOLLIEfEnglish
Variant of DOLLY.
DOLLYfEnglish
Diminutive of DOROTHY. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them. In modern times this name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of DOLORES.
DOLORESfSpanish, English
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.
DOLORSfCatalan
Catalan form of DOLORES.
DOMmEnglish
Short form of DOMINIC.
DOMENmSlovene
Slovene form of DOMINIC.
DOMENICAfItalian
Italian feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOMENICOmItalian
Italian form of DOMINIC. Domenico Veneziano was a Renaissance painter who lived in Florence.
DOMINGAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOMINGOmSpanish
Spanish form of DOMINIC.
DOMINGOSmPortuguese
Portuguese form of DOMINIC.
DOMINICmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
DOMINICUSmLate Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of DOMINIC, as well as the modern Dutch form.
DOMINIQUEf & mFrench
French feminine and masculine form of DOMINIC.
DOMINYKASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of DOMINIC.
DOMITIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of DOMITIUS.
DOMITIANmHistory
From the Roman cognomen Domitianus, itself derived from the family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Domitianus.
DOMITILAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of DOMITILLA.
DOMITILLAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DOMITILLEfFrench
French form of DOMITILLA.
DOMITIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was probably derived from Latin domitus meaning "having been tamed".
DOMNIKAfMacedonian
Macedonian feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOMONKOSmHungarian
Hungarian form of DOMINIC.
DONÁTmHungarian
Hungarian form of Donatus (see DONATO).
DONATmFrench (Rare), Occitan (Rare), Catalan (Rare), Polish (Rare)
French, Occitan, Catalan and Polish form of Donatus (see DONATO).
DONATAfItalian, Lithuanian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Donatus (see DONATO).
DONATASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Donatus (see DONATO).
DONATELLAfItalian
Diminutive of DONATA.
DONATELLOmItalian
Diminutive of DONATO. The Renaissance sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi was better known as Donatello.
DONATIANUSmLate Roman
Derivative of Donatus (see DONATO). This was the name of a few early saints.
DONATIENmFrench
French form of DONATIANUS.
DONATIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of DONATIANUS.
DONATOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the Late Latin name Donatus meaning "given". Several early saints had this name. The name was also borne by two Renaissance masters: the sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi (also known as Donatello), and the architect Donato Bramante.
DONATUSmLate Roman
Latin form of DONATO.
DONCHOmBulgarian
Diminutive of ANDON.
DONČOmMacedonian
Diminutive of ANDON.
DONKAfBulgarian
Feminine diminutive of ANDON.
DORESfPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of DOLORES.
DROUSILLAfBiblical Greek
Form of DRUSILLA used in the Greek New Testament.
DRUSAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of DRUSUS.
DRUSILLAfBiblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
DRUSUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name, also sometimes used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Claudia family. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat. Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong".
DUILIOmItalian, Spanish
From the Roman name Duilius, which is possibly derived from Latin duellum "war". This was the name of a Roman consul who defeated the Carthaginians in a naval battle.
DUKEmEnglish
From the noble title duke, which was originally derived from Latin dux "leader".
DULCIBELLAfEnglish (Archaic)
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
DULCIEfEnglish
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
DURANSmLate Roman
Original Latin form of DURANTE.
DURANTEmItalian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Durans which meant "enduring".
DYANfEnglish
Variant of DIANE.
EALAIRmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HILARY.
EEMELImFinnish
Finnish form of EMIL.
EEMILmFinnish
Finnish form of EMIL.
EFISIOmItalian
From the Latin byname Ephesius, which originally belonged to a person who was from the city of Ephesus in Ionia. This was the name of a saint martyred on Sardinia in the 4th century.
EGIDIJUSmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EGÍDIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EGIDIOmItalian
Italian form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EINIONmWelsh
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
ELIANA (1)fItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.
ÉLIANEfFrench
Probably from Aeliana, the feminine form of the Roman name Aelianus, which was derived from the Roman family name AELIUS. This was the name of an early saint and martyr.
ELIGIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ELIGIUS.
ELIGIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name derived from Latin eligere "to choose". The 7th-century Saint Eligius is the patron saint of metalworkers.
ELIGIUSZmPolish
Polish form of ELIGIUS.
ELIOmItalian
Italian form of AELIUS or HELIOS.
ELISSA (1)fRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown (possibly Phoenician in origin). This is another name of Dido, the legendary queen of Carthage.
ELLARmScottish
Anglicized form of EALAIR.
ELLERYmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ÉLOImFrench
French form of ELIGIUS.
ELOImCatalan
Catalan form of ELIGIUS.
ELOYmSpanish
Spanish form of ELIGIUS.
EMfEnglish
Short form of EMILY or EMMA.
EMELIEfSwedish
Swedish feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMERALDfEnglish (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
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