Names Categorized "animals"

This is a list of names in which the categories include animals.
Filter Results       more options...
AARNE   m   Finnish
Finnish form of ARNE (1).
AART   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of ARNOLD.
ADALBERN   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and bern "bear".
ADERYN   f   Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AETIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was probably derived from Greek αετος (aetos) "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
AGE (2)   f   Estonian
Estonian form of AGNES.
AGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of AGNES or AGATHA.
AGHAVNI   f   Armenian
Means "dove" in Armenian.
ÁGI   f   Hungarian
Diminutive of ÁGOTA or ÁGNES.
AGILULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
AGNĖ   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of AGNES.
ÁGNES   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of AGNES.
AGNÈS   f   French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AGNESA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of AGNES.
AGNESE   f   Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGNESSA   f   Russian
Russian form of AGNES.
AGNETA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of AGNES.
AGNETE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
AGNEZA   f   Croatian
Croatian form of AGNES.
AGNIESZKA   f   Polish
Polish form of AGNES.
AGNIJA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGRIPPA   m & f   Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AIGNÉIS   f   Irish
Irish form of AGNES.
ÁKOS   m   Hungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
ALCYONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ALKYONE   f   Greek Mythology
Original Greek form of ALCYONE.
ALONDRA   f   Spanish
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
ALTAIR   m   Astronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
AMALTHEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αμαλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθασσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a goat who nursed the infant Zeus.
ANDOR (1)   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnþórr, derived from the element arn "eagle" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
ANE (2)   m   Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANGUS   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANNBJØRG   f   Norwegian
Variant of ARNBJØRG.
ANNE (2)   m & f   Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANNICE   f   English
Variant of ANNIS.
ANNIS   f   English
Medieval English form of AGNES.
ANTIMAN   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
ANTINANCO   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche.
APOLINAR   m   Spanish
Spanish form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLINARY   m   Polish
Polish form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLLINAIRE   m   French (Rare)
French form of APOLLINARIS. It was adopted as a surname by the Polish-French poet Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918), who based it on his Polish middle name Apolinary.
APOLLINARIS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from the name of the god APOLLO. This was the name of several early saints and martyrs, including a bishop of Ravenna and a bishop of Hierapolis.
APOLLO   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
APOLLON   m   Greek Mythology
Original Greek form of APOLLO.
APOLLONIOS   m   Ancient Greek
From an ancient Greek personal name which was derived from the name of the Greek god APOLLO. It was borne by a Greek poet of the 3rd century BC. Several saints have also had this name.
AQISSIAQ   m   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "ptarmigan" in Greenlandic (a ptarmigan is a type of bird which lives in cold regions).
AQUILA   m & f   Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
ARACHNE   f   Greek Mythology
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
ARAS   m   Lithuanian
Means "eagle" in Lithuanian.
ARELI   m   Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
AREND   m   Dutch, German
Dutch and German variant of ARNOLD. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
ARI (1)   m   Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARI (2)   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
ARIE (2)   m   Hebrew
Variant transcription of ARIEH.
ARIEH   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew. This was the name of an officer of king Pekahiah in the Old Testament.
'ARI'EL   m   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ARIEL.
ARIEL   m & f   Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARIELLA   f   English (Rare)
Strictly feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIELLE   f   French
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIES   m   Roman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
ARIHEL   m   Biblical Latin
Latin form of ARIEL.
ARIK   m   Hebrew
Diminutive of ARIEL.
ARKADIOS   m   Ancient Greek
From an ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia". Arcadia was a region in Greece, its name deriving from αρκτος (arktos) "bear". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr.
ARKE   m   Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
ARLIE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ARN   m   English
Short form of ARNOLD.
ARNALDO   m   Italian
Italian form of ARNOLD.
ARNAU   m   Catalan
Catalan form of ARNOLD.
ARNAUD   m   French
French form of ARNOLD.
ARNAUDE   f   French (Rare)
French feminine form of ARNOLD.
ARNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
ARNBJØRG   f   Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian form of ARNBJÖRG.
ARNBORG   f   Swedish (Rare)
Swedish form of ARNBJÖRG.
ARNDT   m   German
German short form of ARNOLD.
ARNE (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
ARNE (2)   m   German
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNFINN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arnfinnr, which was derived from the elements arn "eagle" and Finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
ARNFINNR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ARNFINN.
ARNFRIED   m   German (Rare)
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
ÁRNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ARNE (1).
ARNIE   m   English
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNIFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ARNFRIED.
ARNO   m   Dutch, German
Short form of ARNOUD or ARNOLD.
ARNOLD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARNOLFO   m   Italian
Italian form of ARNULF.
ARNÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic variant form of ANDOR (1).
ARNOUD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNOUT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNT   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of AREND.
ARNÞÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ANDOR (1).
ARNÞÓRR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ANDOR (1).
ARNULF   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wulf "wolf".
ARNVIÐR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ARVID.
ARSLAN   m   Turkish, Turkmen
Turkish variant and Turkmen form of ASLAN.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ARVID   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ARYEH   m   Hebrew
Variant transcription of ARIEH.
ASAD   m   Arabic
Means "lion" in Arabic.
ÁSBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and björn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASLAN   m   Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ingush
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The name Aslan was later used by the author C. S. Lewis for the main protagonist (a lion) in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series of books, first appearing in 1950.
ASLANBEK   m   Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Derived from Turkish aslan "lion" combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
ASTOR   m   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
ASUKA   f   Japanese
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
AUCAMAN   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche.
AUNE   f   Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
AVA (3)   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
AVEZA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of AVIS.
AVICE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AVIS.
AVIS   f   English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AYAL   m   Hebrew
Means "stag, hart" in Hebrew.
AYALA   f   Hebrew
Means "doe, gazelle, hind" in Hebrew.
AYELET   f   Hebrew
Means "gazelle, hind". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
BEE   f   English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BEOWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of king Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BERAHTHRABAN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM, using an extended form of the second element.
BERAHTHRAM   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM.
BERENGAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements bern "bear" and ger "spear". This was the name of two medieval kings of Italy and a Holy Roman Emperor.
BERTRAM   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BERTRANDO   m   Italian
Italian form of BERTRAND.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BIBIGUL   f   Kazakh
Means "nightingale" in Kazakh.
BJÖRN   m   Swedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BORIS   m   Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German, History
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century king Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRÂN   m   Welsh Mythology
Variant of BRAN (2).
BRAN (1)   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2)   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANWEN   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRENNUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRENO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
BROCK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BUCK   m   English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUĞRA   m   Turkish
Means "baby camel" in Turkish.
BUNNY   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURÇİN   f & m   Turkish
Means "hind, doe" in Turkish.
CAILEAN   m   Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALEB   m   English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
CALLUM   m   Scottish
Variant of CALUM.
CALUM   m   Scottish
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CELANDINE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CHO   f   Japanese (Rare)
Variant transcription of CHOU.
CHOU   f   Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (chou) meaning "butterfly".
CHOUKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (chou) meaning "butterfly" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations can be possible.
CIRCE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κιρκη (Kirke), which possibly meant "bird". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs but was forced by him to change them back.
CLARK   m   English
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLOVER   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COLEMAN   m   English, Irish
Variant of COLMÁN.
COLIN (1)   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLM   m   Irish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁN   m   Irish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLOMBA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBANO   m   Italian
Italian form of COLUMBANUS.
COLOMBE   f   French
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
COLOMBO   m   Italian
Italian form of COLUMBA.
COLUM   m   Irish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBA   m & f   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBAN   m   Irish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUS   m   Late Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
COLUMBINE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
CONAN   m   Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Gaelic "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was the author who wrote the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
CORAL   f   English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORBIN   m   English
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
CORBINIAN   m   German (Rare)
Variant of KORBINIAN.
CORBINIANUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of KORBINIAN.
CORMAC   m   Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
CORMAG   m   Scottish
Scottish form of CORMAC.
CORNEL   m   Romanian
Romanian form of CORNELIUS.
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CUAUHTÉMOC   m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "falling eagle" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the last Aztec emperor, ruling until he was captured and executed by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the year 1525.
CUNOBELINUS   m   Ancient Celtic
Possibly means "hound of Belenus" from the old Celtic element koun "hound" combined with the name of the god BELENUS. This was the name of a 1st-century king of southeast Britain.
DAGON   m   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Ugaritic dgn meaning "grain". This was the name of a Semitic god of agriculture, usually depicted with the body of a fish.
DAMARIS   f   Biblical, Biblical Greek
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δαμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
DAMHÁN   m   Irish
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DAMHNAIT   f   Irish
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DEB   f   English
Short form of DEBORAH.
DEBBI   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBBIE   f   English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBBORA   f   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of DEBORAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DEBBY   f   English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBI   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DÉBORA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, French
Spanish, Portuguese and French form of DEBORAH.
DEBORA   f   Italian, German, Dutch
Italian, German and Dutch form of DEBORAH.
DEBORAH   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical
Means "bee" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Book of Judges, Deborah is a heroine and prophetess who leads the Israelites when they are threatened by the Canaanites. She forms an army under the command of Barak, and together they destroy the army of the Canaanite commander Sisera. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of the nurse of Rebecca.... [more]
DEBRA   f   English
Variant of DEBORAH.
DEROR   m   Hebrew
Variant transcription of DROR.
DERORIT   f   Hebrew
Variant transcription of DRORIT.
DERYN   f   Welsh
Possibly from Welsh aderyn meaning "bird".
DEVNET   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT.
DEVORAH   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of DEBORAH.
DORCAS   f   Biblical
Derived from Greek δορκας (dorkas) meaning "gazelle". This is the Greek translation of the name Tabitha in the New Testament (see Acts 9:36).
DOVE   f   English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
DRAKE   m   English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
DROR   m   Hebrew
Means "freedom" or "sparrow" in Hebrew.
DRORIT   f   Hebrew
Feminine form of DROR.
DVORAH   f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of DEBORAH.
DYMPHNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who was martyred by her father. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
DYMPNA   f   Irish
Variant of DYMPHNA.
EACHANN   m   Scottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
ÉANNA   m   Irish
Variant of ÉNNA.
ELAIN   f   Welsh
Means "fawn" in Welsh.
ENDA   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ÉNNA.
ENGILRAM   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of ENGUERRAND.
ENGUERRAND   m   Medieval French
Medieval French form of the Germanic name Engilram, which was composed of the elements Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and hramn "raven". This was the name of several French nobles from Picardy.
ÉNNA   m   Irish
Possibly means "bird-like" in Irish. This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany.
ÉOWYN   f   Literature
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
EPONA   f   Celtic Mythology
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ERDOĞAN   m   Turkish
From Turkish er "brave man" and doğan "falcon".
ERLEA   f   Basque
Means "a bee" in Basque.
ÉTAÍN   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét "jealousy". In Irish mythology she was a sun and horse goddess who was the lover of Midir.
EZIO   m   Italian
Italian form of AETIUS.
FAIGA   f   Yiddish
Variant of FAIGEL.
FAIGEL   f   Yiddish
Derived from Yiddish פֵֿײגֶל (feigel) meaning "bird".
FALK   m   German
Means "falcon" in German.
FAWN   f   English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FECHÍN   m   Irish
Means "little raven" from Irish fiach "raven" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint of the 7th century who died of the yellow plague.
FEICHÍN   m   Irish
Variant of FECHÍN.
FEIGE   f   Yiddish
Variant transcription of FAIGA.
FIACHNA   m   Irish
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". This was the name of a king in Irish legend.
FIACHRA   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
FIACRE   m   French (Rare)
French form of FIACHRA.
FINTAN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONNUALA   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
FISHEL   m   Yiddish
Means "little fish" in Yiddish.
FISHKE   m   Yiddish
Variant of FISHEL.
FLUTURA   f   Albanian
Means "butterfly" in Albanian.
FOX   m   English (Rare)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FULTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of the town of Foulden in Norfolk, itself meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
GAL (2)   m   Slovene
Slovene form of GALLUS.
GALL   m   History
Form of GALLUS.
GALLO   m   Italian
Italian form of GALLUS.
GALLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "rooster" in Latin. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
GALO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of GALLUS.
GAWEŁ   m   Polish
Polish form of GALLUS.
GERBEN   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and bern "bear".
GERULF   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GILES   m   English
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
GULL   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
GUNDHRAM   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GUNTRAM.
GUNTRAM   m   German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GWALCHMEI   m   Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with mei "May (the month)". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend. He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from Arthurian romance.
HADIL   f   Arabic
Means "cooing (of a pigeon)" in Arabic.
HAGNE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of AGNES.
HAIDAR   m   Arabic
Means "lion" in Arabic. This was another name of Ali, the husband of Fatimah the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.
HAIDER   m   Arabic
Variant transcription of HAIDAR.
HALCYON   f   Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as Alcyone).
HALCYONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Αλκυονη (Halkyone), a variant of Αλκυονη (see ALCYONE).
HALKYONE   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of HALCYONE.
HARI   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HARISHA   m   Hinduism
Means "lord of monkeys" from Sanskrit हरि (hari) meaning "monkey" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
HARUTO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HAVEL   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HAYATO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HAYDAR   m   Turkish
Turkish form of HAIDAR.
HAYDER   m   Arabic
Variant transcription of HAIDAR.
HAYTHAM   m   Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
HERON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HERU   m   Egyptian Mythology
Reconstructed Egyptian form of HORUS.
HEYDAR   m   Persian
Persian form of HAIDAR.
HIPPOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ιπποκρατης (Hippokrates) which meant "horse power", derived from the elements ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
HIPPOLYTA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of HIPPOLYTE (1). Shakespeare used this name in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595).
HIPPOLYTOS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "freer of horses" from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" and λυω (luo) "to loosen". In Greek legend he was the son of Theseus who was tragically loved by his stepmother Phaedra. This was also the name of a 3rd-century theologian, saint and martyr.
HJÖRTUR   m   Icelandic
Means "deer" in Icelandic.
HONG   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (hóng) meaning "rainbow", (hóng) meaning "enlarge, expand, great" (which is usually only masculine) or 鸿 (hóng) meaning "wild swan, great, vast" (also usually only masculine). Other characters can also form this name.
HOROS   m   Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Heru (see HORUS).
HORUS   m   Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HOTARU   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hotaru) meaning "firefly".
HOWARD   m   English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HOWIE   m   English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HRAFN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
HUITZILOPOCHTLI   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "southern hummingbird" or "left-handed hummingbird" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the god of the sun and war. He was a patron deity of the city of Tenochtitlan (at the site of modern Mexico City).
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HUMPHREY   m   English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.
HUMPHRY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUMPHREY.
HUNBERCT   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMBERT.
HUNFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMPHREY.
HYDER   m   Arabic
Variant transcription of HAIDAR.
IINES   f   Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
INÉS   f   Spanish
Spanish form of AGNES.
INÈS   f   French
French form of INÉS.
INÊS   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of AGNES.
INES   f   Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
INEZ   f   English
English form of INÉS.
IO   f   Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
IONA (2)   m   Russian, Georgian, Biblical Latin
Form of JONAH used in the Latin Old Testament, as well as the Russian and Georgian form.
IONAS   m   Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin
Form of JONAH used in the Greek Bible. It is also the form used in the Latin New Testament.
IVAYLO   m   Bulgarian
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
IZEM   m   Northern African, Berber
Means "lion" in Tamazight.
JAEL   f   Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JAGIENKA   f   Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JAGNA   f   Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JAGUSIA   f   Polish (Rare)
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JANJA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of AGNES. It also may be inspired by Serbo-Croatian janje meaning "lamb".
JAY (1)   m   English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JELENA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JEMIMA   f   Biblical, English
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
Next Page         595 results (this is page 1 of 2)