Names Categorized "flowers"

This is a list of names in which the categories include flowers.
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ABEBAfEastern African, Amharic
Means "flower" in Amharic.
AIRIfJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
ALBENAfBulgarian
Created by Bulgarian writer Yordan Yovkov for the heroine in his drama 'Albena' (1930). He may have based it on ablen, the name of a type of peony (a flowering plant).
ALTANSARNAIfMongolian
Means "golden rose" in Mongolian.
ALTANTSETSEGfMongolian
Means "golden flower" in Mongolian.
ALYSSAfEnglish
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
AMARANTAfSpanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMARANTHAfVarious
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek αμαραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Αμαραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
AMARILISfSpanish
Spanish form of AMARYLLIS.
AMARYLLISfLiterature
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem 'Eclogues'. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
ANARGULfKazakh
Means "blooming pomegranate tree" in Kazakh.
ANEMONEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".
ANFISAfRussian
Russian form of the Greek name Ανθουσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
ANISEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
ANNAGÜLfTurkmen
Derived from Turkmen anna "Friday" and gül "flower, rose".
ANTHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανθεια (Antheia), derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.
ANTHONYmEnglish
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).... [more]
ANTHOUSAfAncient Greek
Ancient Greek form of ANFISA.
AOIf & mJapanese
From Japanese (aoi) meaning "hollyhock, althea" or an adjectival form of (ao) meaning "green, blue". Other kanji with the same reading can form this name as well.
APRILfEnglish
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
ARABINDAmBengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
ARAVINDmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit.
ARAVINDAmIndian, Kannada
Variant transcription of ARAVIND.
AUROBINDOmBengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
AYAKAfJapanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour" combined with (ka) or (ka) which both mean "flower". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AYAMEfJapanese
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
AYGÜLfTurkish
Means "moon rose" in Turkish.
AYGULfAzerbaijani, Uyghur
Azerbaijani and Uyghur form of AYGÜL.
AZALEAfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".
AZUCENAfSpanish
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
BAHARGÜLfTurkmen
Derived from Turkmen bahar meaning "spring" and gül meaning "flower, rose" (both roots ultimately of Persian origin).
BAOf & mChinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
BLAANIDfManx
Manx form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁITHÍNfIrish
Variant of BLÁTHNAT using a different diminutive suffix.
BLANIDfIrish
Anglicized form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁTHNATfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but she was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
BLEJANfCornish
Means "flower" in Cornish.
BLODEUWEDDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. In a story in the Mabinogion, she is created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes. She is eventually changed into an owl for her infidelity.
BLODEUYNfWelsh
Means "flower" in Welsh.
BLODWENfWelsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BLOSSOMfEnglish
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BLUMAfYiddish
Means "flower" in Yiddish.
BOGLÁRKAfHungarian
Means "buttercup" in Hungarian, derived from the archaic word boglár meaning "ornament".
BOPHAfKhmer
Means "flower" in Khmer, ultimately from Pali.
BOTUMfKhmer
Means "lotus" in Khmer.
BRÂNDUȘAfRomanian
Means "crocus" in Romanian.
BRIALLENfWelsh
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BUDmEnglish
Short form of BUDDY.
CALANTHEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CALANTHIAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALFURAYfNative American, Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
CALLAfEnglish
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CAMELIAfRomanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CAPUCINEfFrench
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARMELfEnglish, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMELOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMENfSpanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CELANDINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CELINDAfEnglish (Rare)
Probably a blend of CELIA and LINDA. This is also the Spanish name for a variety of shrub with white flowers, known as sweet mock-orange in English (species Philadelphus coronarius).
CHIKA (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
CHRYSANTAfEnglish (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CHRYSANTHIfGreek
Modern Greek feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CHRYSANTHOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CHRYSSAfGreek
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
ÇİĞDEMfTurkish
Means "crocus" in Turkish.
CLEMATISfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλημα (klema) "twig, branch".
CLOVERfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COLOMBINAfItalian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
COLUMBINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
CORIANDERfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
COSMOmItalian, English
Italian variant of COSIMO. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
CRINAfRomanian
Derived from Romanian crin meaning "lily".
CÚCfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cúc) meaning "chrysanthemum".
CVETAfSerbian
Serbian form of CVETKA.
CVETKAfSlovene
Derived from Slovene cvet meaning "blossom, flower".
CVETKOmSlovene
Masculine form of CVETKA.
CVIJETAfCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of CVETKA.
CVITAfCroatian
Croatian form of CVETKA.
DAFFODILfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAHLIAfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISYfEnglish
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DALIA (1)fSpanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
DIANTHAfDutch, English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
ĐURĐICAfCroatian
Croatian feminine form of GEORGE. It also means "lily of the valley" in Croatian.
EFTHALIAfGreek
Modern Greek form of EUTHALIA.
EGLANTINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.
EIRLYSfWelsh
Means "snowdrop" in Welsh.
ELANORfLiterature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
ENDZELAfGeorgian
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).
ERICAfEnglish, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERIKAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
EUANTHEfAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ευανθης (euanthes) meaning "blooming, flowery", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". According to some sources, this was the name of the mother of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUN-YEONGfKorean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" and (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
EUN-YOUNGfKorean
Variant transcription of EUN-YEONG.
EUTHALIAfAncient Greek
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word ευθαλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and θαλλω (thallo) "to blossom".
FFIONfWelsh
Means "foxglove" in Welsh.
FFLURfWelsh
Welsh form of FLORA.
FIORALBAfItalian
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
FIOREf & mItalian
Means "flower" in Italian. It can also be considered an Italian form of the Latin names FLORA and FLORUS.
FIORELLAfItalian
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FIORENZAfItalian
Italian feminine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FIORENZOmItalian
Italian form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FIORINOmItalian
Italian form of FLORINUS.
FLEURfFrench, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLOfEnglish
Short form of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLOELLAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaborated form of FLO.
FLOORm & fDutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE) or FLORA.
FLOORTJEfDutch
Dutch diminutive of FLOOR.
FLÓRAfHungarian
Hungarian form of FLORA.
FLORAfEnglish, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLOREfFrench
French form of FLORA.
FLORENCEf & mEnglish, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
FLORENCIAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLORENCIOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLORENTmFrench
French masculine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLORENTIAfLate Roman
Original feminine form of FLORENCE.
FLORENTIUSmLate Roman
Original masculine form of FLORENCE.
FLORETTAfEnglish
Latinate diminutive of FLORA.
FLORETTEfFrench (Rare)
French diminutive of FLORA.
FLORIANmGerman, Polish, French
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FLORIANAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Italian feminine form of FLORIAN.
FLORIANEfFrench
French feminine form of FLORIAN.
FLORIANOmItalian
Italian form of FLORIAN.
FLORIJANmCroatian
Croatian form of FLORIAN.
FLORINmRomanian
Romanian form of FLORINUS.
FLORINDAfSpanish, Portuguese
Elaborated form of Spanish or Portuguese flor meaning "flower".
FLORINEfFrench
French feminine form of FLORINUS.
FLORINUSmLate Roman
Latin name which was a derivative of FLORUS. This was the name of a 9th-century Swiss saint.
FLORISmDutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLOROmItalian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of FLORUS.
FLORRIEfEnglish
Diminutive of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLORUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin flos meaning "flower".
FLOSSIEfEnglish
Diminutive of FLORENCE.
FLOWERfEnglish (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FUm & fChinese
From Chinese () meaning "abundant, rich, wealthy", () meaning "hibiscus, lotus" or () meaning "begin, man, father", in addition to other characters with a similar pronunciation. A famous bearer was the 8th-century Tang dynasty poet Du Fu, whose given was .
FUNDAfTurkish
Means "heather" in Turkish.
GARDENIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GARLANDmEnglish
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GENISTAfVarious
From the Latin name of the broom plant.
GENTIANmAlbanian
From the name of the flowering plant called the gentian, the roots of which are used to create a tonic. It is derived from the name of the Illyrian king GENTIUS, who supposedly discovered its medicinal properties.
GENTIANAfAlbanian
Feminine form of GENTIAN.
GHONCHEHfPersian
Means "flower bud" in Persian.
GIACINTAfItalian
Italian feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
GIACINTOmItalian
Italian form of HYACINTHUS.
GOLfPersian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
GOLBAHARfPersian
Means "spring rose" in Persian.
GOLNARfPersian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) "flower, rose" and انار (anar) "pomegranate".
GOLNARAfTatar
Tatar form of GOLNAR.
GOLNAZfPersian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) "flower, rose" and ناز (naz) "pride".
GOLSHANf & mPersian
Means "rose garden" in Persian.
GOLZARm & fPersian
Means "rose cheeked" in Persian.
GONCAfTurkish
Turkish form of GHONCHEH.
GUIYINGm & fChinese
From Chinese (guì) meaning "laurel, cassia, cinnamon" combined with (yīng) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed from other character combinations as well.
GÜLfTurkish
Means "rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
GULm & fUrdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
GÜLAYfTurkish
Means "rose moon" in Turkish.
GULBADANfUrdu (Rare)
Means "having a body like a rose" in Persian. This was the name of a daughter of the Mughal emperor Babur.
GÜLBAHARfTurkish
Turkish form of GOLBAHAR.
GULBAHARf & mUrdu
Urdu form of GOLBAHAR.
GÜLDENfTurkish
Means "from the rose" in Turkish.
GÜLİSTANfTurkish
Means "rose garden" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
GULISTANfKurdish
Kurdish form of GÜLİSTAN.
GULNARfKazakh
Kazakh form of GOLNAR.
GULNARAfKazakh, Kyrgyz, Azerbaijani
Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Azerbaijani form of GOLNAR.
GÜLNAZfTurkish
Turkish form of GOLNAZ.
GULNAZfKazakh, Georgian, Urdu
Kazakh, Georgian and Urdu form of GOLNAZ.
GULNORAfUzbek
Uzbek form of GOLNAR.
GULRUKHfUrdu
Means "rose faced" in Persian. This was the name of a wife of the Mughal emperor Babur.
GÜLŞENfTurkish
Turkish form of GOLSHAN.
GÜLTENfTurkish
Means "rose skin" in Turkish.
GULZARm & fUrdu
Urdu form of GOLZAR.
HADASfHebrew
Means "myrtle tree" in Hebrew.
HADASSAHfBiblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
HADLEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HAJNALKAfHungarian
Means "morning glory (flower)" in Hungarian.
HANA (3)fJapanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) which both mean "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HANAEfJapanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana), which both mean "flower", combined with (e) meaning "picture" or (e) meaning "favour, benefit". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HANAKOfJapanese
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
HANGAfHungarian
Means "heather" in Hungarian.
HARUKAf & mJapanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
HEf & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
HEATHERfEnglish
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
HEDLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEITIAREfTahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and tiare "flower".
HINATAf & mJapanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written using the hiragana writing system.
HOAfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hoa) meaning "flower".
HODEfYiddish
Yiddish form of HADASSAH.
HODELfYiddish
Diminutive of HODE.
HONOKAfJapanese
From Japanese (hono) meaning "harmony" (using an obscure nanori reading) and (ka) meaning "flower", as well as other combinations of kanji which have the same pronunciation. Very often it is written using the hiragana writing system.
HORTENSIAfAncient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name Hortensius, possibly derived from Latin hortus "garden".
HRODOHAIDISfAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type" (see ROSE).
HUAf & mChinese
From Chinese (huá) meaning "splendid, illustrious, Chinese" or (huā) meaning "flower, blossom" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well.
HUỆfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (huệ) meaning "bright, intelligent" or (huệ) meaning "orchid".
HUHANAfMaori
Maori form of SUSAN.
HYACINTH (2)fEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone which also bears this name), ultimately from Greek ‘υακινθος (hyakinthos).
HYACINTHAfHistory
Latinate feminine form of HYACINTHUS, used to refer to the 17th-century Italian saint Hyacintha Mariscotti (real name Giacinta).
HYACINTHEm & fFrench
French masculine and feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
HYACINTHUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Υακινθος (Hyakinthos), which was derived from the name of the hyacinth flower. In Greek legend Hyakinthos was accidentally killed by Apollo, who caused a lily to arise from his blood. The name was also borne by several early saints, notably a 3rd-century martyr who was killed with his brother Protus.
IANTHEfGreek Mythology
Means "violet flower", derived from Greek ιον (ion) "violet" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of an ocean nymph in Greek mythology.
IBOLYAfHungarian
Means "violet" in Hungarian, ultimately from Latin viola.
IIRISfFinnish
Finnish form of IRIS.
IOLAfEnglish
Probably a variant of IOLE.
IOLANDAfItalian, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of YOLANDA.
IOLANTHEfVarious
Probably a variant of YOLANDA influenced by the Greek words ιολη (iole) "violet" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was (first?) used by Gilbert and Sullivan in their comic opera 'Iolanthe' (1882).
IOLEfGreek Mythology
Means "violet" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a woman beloved by Herakles.
IONEfGreek Mythology, English
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.
ÍRISfPortuguese, Icelandic
Portuguese and Icelandic form of IRIS.
IRISfGreek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRITfHebrew
Means "asphodel" in Hebrew (an asphodel is a type of flower).
IVANČICAfCroatian
Means "daisy" in Croatian.
IVYfEnglish
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
IZDIHARfArabic
Means "blossoming, prospering" in Arabic.
JACEKmPolish
Modern form of JACENTY.
JACENTYmPolish (Rare)
Polish form of HYACINTHUS. Saint Jacenty was a 13th-century Dominican monk from Krakow who was said to have taken missionary journeys throughout northern Europe and Asia.
JACINTAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
JACINTHfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
JACINTHAfDutch (Rare)
Latinate form of JACINTHE.
JACINTHEfFrench
French cognate of HYACINTH (2).
JACINTOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HYACINTHUS.
JARAHmBiblical
Means "honeycomb" and "honeysuckle" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a descendant of Saul.
JASMIJNfDutch
Dutch form of JASMINE.
JASMIN (1)fGerman, Finnish, English
German and Finnish form of JASMINE, as well as an English variant.
JASMIN (2)mFrench (Rare)
French masculine form of JASMINE.
JASMINAfCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian, Slovene and Macedonian form of JASMINE.
JASMINEfEnglish, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JASMINKAfCroatian
Croatian diminutive of JASMINA.
JÁZMINfHungarian
Hungarian form of JASMINE.
JESSAMINEfEnglish (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JI-YEONGf & mKorean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend" combined with (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper". Many other hanja character combinations are possible.
JI-YOUNGf & mKorean
Variant transcription of JI-YEONG.
JOLAfPolish
Short form of JOLANTA.
JOLANAfCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of YOLANDA.
JOLANDAfDutch, Slovene, Croatian, Italian
Dutch, Slovene and Croatian form of YOLANDA, as well as an Italian variant of IOLANDA.
JOLANTAfPolish, Lithuanian
Polish and Lithuanian form of YOLANDA.
JONQUILfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
JUf & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "chrysanthemum" (which is usually only feminine) or () meaning "big, enormous" (usually only masculine), besides other characters which are pronounced similarly.
KALINmBulgarian
Masculine form of KALINA.
KALINAfBulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.
KAMALAf & mHinduism, Tamil, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Hindi, Nepali
Means "lotus" or "pale red" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form कमला and the masculine form कमल. This is the name of one of the Krittikas, or Pleiades, in Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata'. It is also another name of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi.
KAMILLAfHungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Hungarian form of CAMILLA, as well as a Scandinavian variant. This is also the Hungarian word for the chamomile flower (species Matricaria chamomilla).
KANONfJapanese
From Japanese (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" and (non) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
KAPUAf & mHawaiian
Means "the flower" or "the child" from Hawaiian ka, a definite article, and pua "flower, offspring".
KAREN (3)fJapanese
From Japanese (ka) meaning "flower" and (ren) meaning "lotus, water lily". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
KASUMIfJapanese
From Japanese (kasumi) meaning "mist". It can also come from (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" combined with (sumi) meaning "clear, pure". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KELILAfHebrew
Means "crown of laurel" in Hebrew.
KIELOfFinnish
Means "lily of the valley" in Finnish.
KIKUfJapanese
From Japanese (kiku) meaning "chrysanthemum", as well as other kanji characters which are pronounced the same way.
KLYTIËfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
KOLABfKhmer
Means "rose" in Khmer.
KUKKAfFinnish
Means "flower" in Finnish.
KULAPf & mThai
Means "rose" in Thai.
KUNALAmSanskrit
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a son of the 3rd-century BC Indian emperor Ashoka.
KUSUMAm & fIndonesian
Derived from Sanskrit कुसुम (kusuma) meaning "flower".
KVETAfCzech
Derived from Czech kvet meaning "flower, blossom".
LAELIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.
LAKSHMIf & mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi
Means "sign, mark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu goddess of prosperity, good luck, and beauty. She is the wife of Vishnu and her symbol is the lotus flower, with which she is often depicted.
LALAfBulgarian
From a South Slavic word meaning "tulip". It is derived via Turkish from Persian لاله (laleh).
LALEfTurkish
Means "tulip" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
LALEHfPersian
Means "tulip" in Persian.
LALLAfLiterature
Derived from Persian لاله (laleh) meaning "tulip". This was the name of the heroine of Thomas Moore's poem 'Lalla Rookh' (1817). In the poem, Lalla, the daughter of the emperor of Delhi, listens to a poet sing four tales.
LANf & mChinese, Vietnamese
From Chinese (lán) meaning "orchid, elegant" (which is usually only feminine) or (lán) meaning "mountain mist". Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. As a Vietnamese name, it is derived from Sino-Vietnamese meaning "orchid".
LAVENDERfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LEANNAfEnglish
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA.
LEHUAf & mHawaiian
Means "ohia flower" in Hawaiian.
LEI (1)m & fHawaiian
Means "flowers, lei, child" in Hawaiian.
LEILANIf & mHawaiian
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
LEIMOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl lei" or "pearl child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and momi "pearl".
LIA (2)fItalian, Dutch
Short form of ROSALIA, JULIA, and other names ending in lia.
LIANAfItalian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LIÊNfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (liên) meaning "lotus, water lily".
LILACfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILACHfHebrew
Means "lilac" in Hebrew.
LÍLEfIrish
Irish form of LILY.
LILEASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILIfGerman, French, Hungarian
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LILIAfSpanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Spanish and Italian form of LILY, as well as a Russian and Ukrainian variant transcription of LILIYA.
LÍLIANfPortuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese variant of LILLIAN.
LILIANf & mEnglish, French
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.