Names Categorized "gemstones"

This is a list of names in which the categories include gemstones.
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ADI (1)f & mHebrew
Means "jewel" or "ornament" in Hebrew.
AKI (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
AKIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKIRAm & fJapanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
ALMASf & mArabic
Means "diamond" in Arabic, ultimately from Persian.
ALMASTfArmenian
Means "diamond" in Armenian, ultimately from Persian.
ALMOGm & fHebrew
Means "coral" in Hebrew.
ÁMBARfSpanish
Spanish cognate of AMBER.
AMBERfEnglish, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBRAfItalian
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMBREfFrench
French cognate of AMBER.
AMETHYSTfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AZURAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
AZUREfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
AZZURRAfItalian
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
BẢOmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bảo) meaning "protection, security".
BAOf & mChinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
BAT-ERDENEmMongolian
Means "strong jewel" in Mongolian.
BERMETfKyrgyz
Means "pearl" in Kyrgyz.
BERYLfEnglish
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BIJOUfVarious
Means "jewel" in French.
BISERAfBulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) "pearl" (ultimately of Arabic origin).
BISERKAfCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of BISERA.
BOLORMAAfMongolian
Means "crystal mother" in Mongolian.
CELESTINEf & mEnglish
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CEVAHİRf & mTurkish
Turkish form of JAWAHIR.
CHALCHIUHTICUEfAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl. She was the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
CHANDRAKANTmIndian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHÂUf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (châu) meaning "pearl, gem".
CORALfEnglish, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORALIEfFrench
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CRYSTALfEnglish
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
DARf & mHebrew
Means "mother-of-pearl, nacre" in Hebrew.
DIAMANTOfGreek
Derived from Greek διαμαντι (diamanti) meaning "diamond".
DIAMONDfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DORJIf & mTibetan, Bhutanese
Means "diamond" in Tibetan.
DURDONAfUzbek
Means "pearl" in Uzbek.
DZHOKHARmChechen
Possibly from Persian گوهر (gohar) "jewel, essence" or جوهر (johar) "essence, ink" (which comes from the same root, but via a loan to Arabic and retransmission to Persian).
ELECTRAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELETTRAfItalian
Italian form of ELECTRA.
ELMASfTurkish
Means "diamond" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
EMERALDfEnglish (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
ERDENECHIMEGfMongolian
Means "jewel ornament" in Mongolian.
ESMERALDAfSpanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
FAIRUZfArabic
Variant transcription of FAYRUZ.
FAIRUZAfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FAYRUZfArabic
Means "turquoise (the gemstone)" in Arabic, ultimately of Persian origin.
FERUZAfUzbek
Uzbek form of FIRUZEH.
FIROOZEHfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FIROUZEHfPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZEH.
FIROZmPersian
Variant transcription of FIRUZ.
FİRUZƏfAzerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of FIRUZEH.
FIRUZAfTajik, Uzbek, Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani, Tajik, Uzbek and Azerbaijani form of FIRUZEH.
FİRUZEfTurkish
Turkish form of FIRUZEH.
FIRUZEHfPersian
Means "turquoise (the gemstone)" in Persian. Alternatively, it may be a feminine form of FIRUZ.
GARNET (1)fEnglish
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GAUHARfUrdu, Kazakh
From Persian گوهر (gohar) meaning "jewel, gemstone".
GAWAHIRfArabic
Variant transcription of JAWAHIR.
GEMAfSpanish
Spanish form of GEMMA.
GEMMAfItalian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GIADAfItalian
Italian form of JADE.
GINTARASmLithuanian
Means "amber" in Lithuanian.
GINTARĖfLithuanian
Feminine form of GINTARAS.
GOHARfArmenian
Means "jewel" in Armenian, ultimately of Persian origin.
GOSIAfPolish
Diminutive of MAŁGORZATA.
GREETfDutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of MARGARET.
GREETJEfDutch
Dutch diminutive of MARGARET.
GRÉTAfHungarian, Icelandic
Short form of MARGARÉTA (Hungarian) or MARGRÉT (Icelandic).
GRETAfGerman, Italian, Lithuanian, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHENfGerman, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETEfGerman, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETELfGerman
Diminutive of GRETE. This name is well-known as the character in Grimm's fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch.
GRIETfDutch
Short form of MARGRIET.
GYEONGm & fKorean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city", (gyeong) meaning "scenery, view", (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour", or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
GYÖNGYIfHungarian
From Hungarian gyöngy meaning "pearl", of Turkic origin.
HELMIfFinnish, Swedish
Diminutive of VILHELMIINA or VILHELMINA. It also means "pearl" in Finnish.
HIROSHImJapanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations which are read the same way.
HYACINTH (2)fEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone which also bears this name), ultimately from Greek ‘υακινθος (hyakinthos).
HYEON-JUf & mKorean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" and (ju) meaning "jewel, pearl". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYUN-JOOf & mKorean
Variant transcription of HYEON-JU.
INBARfHebrew
Means "amber" in Hebrew.
INTANfIndonesian, Malay
Means "diamond" in Malay and Indonesian.
INZHUfKazakh
Means "pearl" in Kazakh.
JACINTHfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
JADA (1)fEnglish
Possibly an elaborated form of JADE. This name came into general use in the 1960s, and was popularized in the 1990s by actress Jada Pinkett Smith (1971-).
JADEf & mEnglish, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JASPERmEnglish, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAWAHIRfArabic
Means "jewels" in Arabic, ultimately from Persian گوهر (gohar) meaning "jewel, essence".
JETTmEnglish (Modern)
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
JEWELf & mEnglish
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JEWELLf & mEnglish
Variant of JEWEL.
JI-MINf & mKorean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JINGm & fChinese
From Chinese (jìng) meaning "quiet, still, gentle", (jīng) meaning "essence, spirit", (jīng) meaning "clear, crystal" or (jīng) meaning "capital city". Other characters can also form this name.
JUMANAfArabic
Means "pearl" in Arabic.
JUMANAHfArabic
Variant transcription of JUMANA.
JUVELAfEsperanto
Means "jewel-like" in Esperanto.
KAHURANGIf & mMaori
From the name of a type of green gemstone found in New Zealand, meaning "sky blue" in Maori.
KAILASHmIndian, Hindi, Marathi
From the name of a mountain in the Himalayas which is believed to be the paradise of the Hindu god Shiva. It possibly means "crystal" in Sanskrit.
KAIMANAm & fHawaiian
From Hawaiian kai "ocean, sea" and mana "power". It is also Hawaiian meaning "diamond", derived from the English word diamond.
KOHAKUf & mJapanese
From Japanese 琥珀 (kohaku) meaning "amber".
KOHARfArmenian
Western Armenian transcription of GOHAR.
KORALIAfGreek, Late Greek
Derived from Ancient Greek κοραλλιον (korallion) meaning "coral" (in Modern Greek κοραλλι). This was the name of an obscure 4th-century saint and martyr from Thrace.
KORALJKAfCroatian
From Croatian koralj meaning "coral", ultimately from Latin.
KORALOmEsperanto
Means "coral" in Esperanto.
KYOm & fJapanese
Variant transcription of KYOU.
KYOUm & fJapanese
From Japanese (kyou) meaning "unite, cooperate", (kyou) meaning "capital city", (kyou) meaning "village", (kyou) meaning "apricot", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
KYUNGm & fKorean
Variant transcription of GYEONG.
LALIfGeorgian
Means "ruby" in Georgian, of Sanskrit origin.
LEIMOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl lei" or "pearl child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and momi "pearl".
LI (1)f & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "reason, logic", () meaning "stand, establish", () meaning "black, dawn", () meaning "power, capability, influence" (which is usually only masculine) or () meaning "beautiful" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
LIMm & fChinese
Hokkien Chinese form of LIN.
LINm & fChinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest" or (lín) meaning "fine jade, gem". Other characters can also form this name.
LINGf & mChinese
From Chinese (líng) meaning "spirit, soul", (líng) meaning "bell, chime", or other Chinese characters which are pronounced similarly.
LULITfEastern African, Amharic
From Amharic ሉል (lul) meaning "pearl".
LULU (2)fArabic
Means "pearl" in Arabic.
MAARITfFinnish
Finnish form of MARGARET.
MADGEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAGGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAIGHREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MAIRÉADfIrish
Irish form of MARGARET.
MAIREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MAISIEfScottish
Diminutive of MAIREAD.
MAŁGORZATAfPolish
Polish form of MARGARET.
MAMIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARY or MARGARET.
MANI (1)mHinduism, Tamil, Indian, Malayalam, Telugu, Kannada
Means "jewel" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this name is borne by a serpent and an attendant of Skanda.
MAREDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MARETfEstonian
Estonian form of MARGARET.
MARGAIDfManx
Manx form of MARGARET.
MARGALITfHebrew
Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites).
MARGAREETAfFinnish (Rare)
Finnish variant form of MARGARET.
MARGARETfEnglish
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
MARGARÉTAfHungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARGARETEfGerman
German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHAfDutch, German
Dutch and German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHEfGerman, Danish
German and Danish form of MARGARET.
MARGARETTAfEnglish
Latinate form of MARGARET.
MARGARIDfArmenian
Variant transcription of MARGARIT.
MARGARIDAfPortuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan
Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of MARGARET. This is also the Portuguese and Galician word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGARITfArmenian
Armenian form of MARGARET, also meaning "pearl" in Armenian.
MARGARITAfSpanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Greek, Late Roman
Latinate form of MARGARET. This is also a Latin word meaning "pearl" and a Spanish word meaning "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGAUXfFrench
Variant of MARGOT influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
MARGEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGEDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MARGERYfEnglish
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARGHERITAfItalian
Italian form of MARGARET. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGITfHungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARGITAfSlovak
Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARGOTfFrench
French short form of MARGARET.
MARGREETfLimburgish, Dutch
Limburgish form of MARGARET and a Dutch variant of MARGRIET.
MARGRÉTfIcelandic
Icelandic form of MARGARET.
MARGRETEfNorwegian
Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARGRETHEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARGARET. This is the name of the current queen of Denmark (1940-).
MARGRIETfDutch
Dutch form of MARGARET. This is also the Dutch word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGRITfGerman
German variant form of MARGARET.
MARGUERITEfFrench
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARITfSwedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARITA (2)fSwedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARJANIfEastern African, Swahili
Means "coral" in Swahili, originally a borrowing from Arabic.
MARJETAfSlovene
Slovene form of MARGARET.
MARJORIEfEnglish
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MARKÉTAfCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARKETTAfFinnish
Finnish form of MARGARET.
MARSAILIfScottish
Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA.
MÄRTAfSwedish
Swedish short form of MARGARETA.
MARZENAfPolish
Probably originally a Polish diminutive of MARIA or MAŁGORZATA.
MAYfEnglish
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MAYMEfEnglish
Possibly a variant of MAMIE.
MEAGANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MEAGHANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MEGfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MEGANfWelsh, English
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEGGYfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MEGHANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MERERIDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MERETEfDanish
Danish form of MARGARET.
METAfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of MARGARET.
METTEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish diminutive of MARGARET.
MICAfEnglish
Short form of MICHAELA.
MINGm & fChinese
From Chinese (míng) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (míng) meaning "inscribe, engrave", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
MINHmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (minh) meaning "bright". A famous bearer was the communist revolutionary Ho Chi Minh (1890-1969).
MOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl" in Hawaiian.
MORVARIDfPersian
Means "pearl" in Persian.
MYEONGm & fKorean
From Sino-Korean (myeong) meaning "bright, light, clear" or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. Although it does appear rarely as a single-character name, it is more often used in combination with another character.
MYSIEfScottish
Variant of MAISIE.
MYUNGm & fKorean
Variant transcription of MYEONG.
NEELAfTamil, Indian, Hindi
Variant transcription of NILA.
NEELAMf & mIndian, Hindi, Marathi
Variant transcription of NILAM.
NEELIMAfIndian, Marathi, Hindi, Telugu
Variant transcription of NILIMA.
NGỌCf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (ngọc) meaning "jade, precious stone, gem".
NILAfTamil, Indian, Hindi
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
NILAMf & mIndian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "dark blue, sapphire" in Sanskrit.
NILIMAfIndian, Marathi, Hindi, Telugu
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
NORBUmTibetan, Bhutanese
Means "jewel" in Tibetan.
OPALfEnglish
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPALINEfEnglish (Rare)
Elaborated form of OPAL.
PAAIEfManx
Manx form of PEGGY.
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLEfEnglish
Variant of PEARL.
PEARLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of PEARL.
PEGfEnglish
Short form of PEGGY.
PEGGIEfEnglish
Variant of PEGGY.
PEGGYfEnglish
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PEIGIfScottish
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PENINNAHfBiblical
Means "precious stone, pearl" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the wives of Elkanah, the other being Hannah.
PERELEfYiddish
Variant of PERLE.
PERLAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERLEfFrench, Yiddish
French and Yiddish cognate of PEARL. It is also used as a Yiddish vernacular form of Margaret.
PERLITAfItalian, Spanish
Diminutive of PERLA.
PICHf & mKhmer
Means "diamond" in Khmer.
QIUm & fChinese
From Chinese (qiū) meaning "autumn", (qiū) meaning "hill, mound", or other characters with a similar pronunciation. The given name of the philosopher Confucius was .
RATHNAf & mTamil
Southern Indian variant of RATNA.
RATNAf & mIndian, Hindi, Telugu, Nepali, Indonesian
Derived from Sanskrit रत्न (ratna) meaning "jewel, treasure". This is a transcription of both the feminine form रत्ना and the masculine form रत्न.
RATNAMm & fIndian, Telugu
Southern Indian variant of RATNA.
REETAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
REETTAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
REIfJapanese
From Japanese (rei) meaning "bell", (rei) meaning "beautiful, lovely" or (rei) meaning "the tinkling of jade". This name can also be formed by other kanji with the same pronunciation.
RITAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
RUBENAfEsperanto
Means "like a ruby" in Esperanto.
RUBINAfItalian
Derived from Italian rubino meaning "ruby", ultimately from Latin ruber "red".
RUBYfEnglish
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUBYEfEnglish
Variant of RUBY.
SADAFfArabic
Means "seashell, mother-of-pearl" in Arabic.
SAFIRAfEsperanto
Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.
SANGOfPopular Culture
Means "coral" in Japanese. This name is used in the Japanese comic book and television show 'InuYasha'.
SAPIRfHebrew
Means "sapphire" in Hebrew.
SAPPHIRAfBiblical
From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
SAPPHIREfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SAPPHOfAncient Greek
Possibly from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Greek poetess from Lesbos.
SEDEFfTurkish
Turkish form of SADAF.
SHINJUfJapanese
From Japanese 真珠 (shinju) meaning "pearl".
TAKARAm & fJapanese
From Japanese (takara) meaning "treasure, jewel", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
THUfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (thu) meaning "autumn".
TOPAZfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
YALINGfChinese
From Chinese () meaning "elegant, graceful, refined" combined with (líng) meaning "tinkling of jade". This name can be formed of other character combinations as well.
YEŞİMfTurkish
Means "jade" in Turkish.
YUf & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "jade, precious stone, gem", () meaning "pleasant, delightful" or () meaning "rain". Other characters can form this name as well.
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