Names Categorized "light"

This is a list of names in which the categories include light.
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ABERASH f Eastern African, Amharic
Means "giving off light, shining" in Amharic.
ABHA f Indian, Hindi
Means "splendour, light" in Sanskrit.
ABNER m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew, from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and נִיר (nir) meaning "lamp, light". In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. After he killed Asahel he was himself slain by Asahel's brother Joab. It has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. It was popular with the Puritans, who brought it to America in the 17th century.
ACHIENG f Eastern African, Luo
Feminine form of OCHIENG.
ADHARA f Astronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.
AEGLE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αιγλη (Aigle), which meant "light, radiance, glory". This was the name of several characters in Greek myth, including one of the Heliades and one of the Hesperides.
AELIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was possibly derived from the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun". This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
AGIM m Albanian
Means "dawn" in Albanian.
AGLAIA f Greek Mythology, Greek
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
ÁINE f Irish
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.
AKEMI f Japanese
From Japanese (ake) meaning "bright" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AKI (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
AKIHITO m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) or (aki) both meaning "bright" combined with (hito) meaning "compassionate". Other kanji combinations are possible. Akihito (1933-), name written , is the Emperor of Japan.
AKIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKIO m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "bright, luminous" combined with (o) meaning "man, husband", (o) meaning "male" or (o) meaning "hero, manly". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AKIRA m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
ALBA (1) f Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALBERT m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBINUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of ALBUS. Saint Albinus (also called Aubin) was a 6th-century bishop of Angers in Brittany.
ALBUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
ALENKA f Slovene
Slovene diminutive of ALENA.
ALTAN m Turkish
Means "red dawn" in Turkish.
ALYONA f Russian
Originally a Russian diminutive of YELENA. It is now used independently.
AMALBERT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements amal meaning "work, labour" and beraht meaning "bright".
AMANDEEP m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Punjabi ਅਮਨ (aman) meaning "peace" (ultimately from Arabic) and Sanskrit दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
AMARDEEP m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit अमर (amara) meaning "immortal" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
AMARYLLIS f Literature
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem 'Eclogues'. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
AMATERASU f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
ANATOLIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of ANATOLIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Italian saint and martyr.
ANATOLIUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανατολιος (Anatolios), derived from ανατολη (anatole) meaning "sunrise". Saint Anatolius was a 3rd-century philosopher from Alexandria.
ANATOLIY m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDEBERT m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic element and "wrath, zeal" combined with beraht "bright".
ANTIMAN m Native American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
ANWAR m Arabic
Means "brighter, more luminous" in Arabic. This name was borne by Egyptian president Anwar Sadat (1918-1981), who was assassinated three years after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
AOIBHEANN f Irish
Means "beautiful, pleasant, radiant" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of the mother of Saint Enda. It was also borne by Irish royalty.
ARASH m Persian, Persian Mythology
Possibly means either "truthfulness" or "bright" in Persian. In Persian legend Arash was a Persian archer who was ordered by the Turans to shoot an arrow, the landing place of which would determine the new location of the Persian-Turan border. Arash climbed a mountain and fired his arrow with such strength that it flew for several hours and landed on the banks of the far-away Oxus River.
ARGUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αργος (Argos), derived from αργος (argos) meaning "glistening, shining". In Greek myth this name belonged to both the man who built the Argo and a man with a hundred eyes.
ARUSHI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit अरुष (arusha) meaning "reddish, dawn", a word used in the Rigveda to describe the red horses of Agni. This name also appears in the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' belonging to a daughter of Manu and the wife of Chyavana, though in this case it might derive from Sanskrit आरुषी (arushi) meaning "hitting, killing".
ASHRAQAT f Arabic
Means "brightness" in Arabic.
ASHWIN m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit अश्विन् (ashvin) meaning "possessed of horses". The Ashvins are twin Hindu gods of the sunrise and sunset.
ASTROPHEL m Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek αστηρ (aster) "star" and φιλος (philos) "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'.
AURA f English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αυρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AUREOLE f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
AURORA f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AURORE f French
French form of AURORA.
AUŠRA f Lithuanian
Means "dawn" in Lithuanian.
AVTANDIL m Georgian, Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin'. Rustaveli based it on Persian آفتاب (aftab) "sunshine" and دل (dil) "heart". In the poem Avtandil is a knight who is sent by Tinatin to search for the mysterious knight of the title.
AYELET f Hebrew
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
AYLA (2) f Turkish
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.
AYLİN f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "of the moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon".
AYNUR f Turkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Uyghur
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
AZAHARA f Spanish
Variant of AZAHAR. It can also be given in reference to the ruined Moorish city of Medina Azahara in Córdoba, which derives from the related Arabic root زهر (zahara) meaning "to shine".
AZHAR m Arabic, Urdu, Malay
Means "shining, bright" in Arabic.
BAST f Egyptian Mythology
Possibly means "fire, heat" or "ointment jar" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BASTET f Egyptian Mythology
Variant of BAST. This form of the name, a diminutive, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
BELENUS m Celtic Mythology
Probably from a Celtic word meaning "bright, brilliant". This was the name of a Gaulish solar god who was often equated with Apollo.
BELPHOEBE f Literature
Combination of belle "beautiful" and the name PHOEBE. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
BERAHTHRABAN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM, using an extended form of the second element.
BERAHTHRAM m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM.
BERGLJOT f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
BERT m English, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BERTHA f German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BERTRAM m English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BERTRAND m French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BHASKARA m Hinduism
Means "shining", derived from a combination of Sanskrit भास (bhasa) meaning "light" and कर (kara) meaning "maker". This is another name of the sun and the Hindu god Shiva. It was additionally borne by a 12th-century Indian astronomer, also known as Bhaskaracharya.
BITUIN f Filipino, Tagalog
Means "star" in Tagalog.
BJARTE m Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Bjartr, which meant "bright".
CANDE f & m Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA or CANDELARIO.
CANDELA f Spanish
Short form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELARIO m Spanish
Masculine form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELAS f Spanish
Diminutive of CANDELARIA.
CASSANDRA f English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CASTOR m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). Alternatively it could be derived from the Greek word καστωρ (kastor) meaning "beaver", though the legends about Castor do not mention beavers, which were foreign animals to the Greeks. In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CHANDER m Indian, Hindi
Alternate transcription of Hindi चन्द्र or चन्द्रा (see CHANDRA).
CHANDLER m & f English
From an occupational surname that meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CHANDRA m & f Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts, which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (chāng) meaning "flourish, prosper, good, sunlight" (which is usually only masculine), (chàng) meaning "smooth, free, unrestrained" or (cháng) meaning "long". Other Chinese characters are also possible.
CHANTREA f Khmer
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
CHARALAMPOS m Greek
Means "to shine from happiness" from Greek χαρα (chara) "happiness" combined with λαμπω (lampo) "to shine".
CHIARA f Italian
Italian form of CLARA. Saint Chiara (commonly called Saint Clare in English) was a follower of Saint Francis of Assisi.
CLARA f German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARICE f English
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CUTHBERT m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CYMBELINE m Literature
Form of CUNOBELINUS used by Shakespeare in his play 'Cymbeline' (1609).
DAI m Welsh
Derived from the old Celtic word dei meaning "to shine". This name is also used as a Welsh diminutive of DAVID.
DAIKI m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "tree" or (ki) meaning "valuable". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
DARA (2) f & m Khmer
Means "star" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
DAWN f English
From the English word dawn, ultimately derived from Old English dagung.
DEEPA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपा, Gurmukhi ਦੀਪਾ, Bengali দীপা, Malayalam ദീപ or Tamil தீபா (see DIPA).
DEEPALI f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपाली (see DIPALI).
DEEPIKA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपिका, Kannada ದೀಪಿಕಾ, Malayalam ദീപിക, Tamil தீபிகா or Telugu దీపికా (see DIPIKA).
DIAN m & f Indonesian
Means "candle" in Indonesian.
DIPA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "light, lamp" in Sanskrit.
DIPALI f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "row of lamps" in Sanskrit.
DRITA f Albanian
From Albanian dritë meaning "light".
EIRIAN f & m Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
ELAINE f English, Arthurian Romance
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation 'Le Morte d'Arthur' Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859).
ELANOR f Literature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
ELEN f Welsh
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELENA f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELENE f Georgian, Sardinian
Georgian and Sardinian form of HELEN.
ELENI f Greek
Modern Greek form of HELEN.
ELIINA f Finnish
Finnish form of HELEN.
ELIN f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELĪNA f Latvian
Latvian form of HELEN.
ELINA f Finnish, Estonian, Swedish
Finnish, Estonian and Swedish form of HELEN.
ELIOR m Hebrew
Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.
ELIORA f Hebrew
Feminine form of ELIOR.
ELLEN (1) f English
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.
ELOISE f English
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.... [more]
ELOUAN m Breton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
ENDRIT m Albanian
From Albanian dritë meaning "light".
ENFYS m & f Welsh
Means "rainbow" in Welsh.
EOS f Greek Mythology
Means "dawn" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the dawn.
ERLANTZ m Basque
Means "glow, shine" in Basque.
ESTELLE f English, French
From an Old French name that was derived from Latin stella meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTRELLA f Spanish
Spanish form of STELLA (1), coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
EUCLID m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ευκλειδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and κλεος (kleos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
FAJR f Arabic
Means "dawn, beginning" in Arabic.
FILIBERT m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
FIORALBA f Italian
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
FULGENCIO m Spanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Fulgentius, which meant "shining" from Latin fulgens. Saint Fulgentius was a 6th-century bishop from Tunisia who was a friend of Saint Augustine.
GALADRIEL f Literature
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GILBERT m English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILBERTE f French
French feminine form of GILBERT.
GISBERT m German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GLÆDWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GOIZARGI f Basque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and argi "light".
GRY f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Means "dawn" in Norwegian.
GÜLNUR f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
GWAWR f Welsh
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
HAJNA f Hungarian
Shortened form of HAJNAL. The Hungarian poet Mihály Vörösmarty used it in his epic poem 'Zalán Futása' (1825).
HAJNAL f Hungarian
Means "dawn" in Hungarian.
HAJNI f Hungarian
Diminutive of HAJNAL or HAJNALKA.
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HARUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
HELEEN f Dutch
Dutch variant of HELEN.
HELEENA f Finnish
Finnish variant of HELENA.
HELEENTJE f Dutch
Dutch diminutive of HELEN.
HELEN f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HELÉNA f Hungarian
Hungarian form of HELEN.
HELĒNA f Latvian
Latvian form of HELEN.
HÉLÈNE f French
French form of HELEN.
HELENE f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELI (2) f Finnish
Diminutive of HELENA.
HELIODORO m Spanish, Portuguese
From the Greek name ‘Ηλιοδωρος (Heliodoros), derived from the elements ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" and δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Heliodoro was a 4th-century bishop of Altino.
HELIOS m Greek Mythology
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, a Titan, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses. His sister was the moon goddess Selene.
HELLEN f English
Variant of HELEN.
HIKARI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
HIKARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
HILA f Hebrew
Means "halo, aura" in Hebrew, from the root הָלַל (halal) meaning "to praise, to shine".
HILDEBERT m German (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HINA f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HIROKI m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
HUANG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "bright, shining, luminous" (which is usually only masculine) or (huáng) meaning "phoenix" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
HUBERT m English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUỆ f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (huệ) meaning "bright, intelligent" or (huệ) meaning "orchid".
HUMBERT m French, German (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HUMPHREY m English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.
HUNBERCT m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMBERT.
HWAN m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (hwan) meaning "shining, brilliant, lustrous" or other characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character.
HYEON-JEONG f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" or (hyeon) meaning "shine, glitter" combined with (jeong) meaning "court" or (jeong) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYUN-JUNG f & m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 현정 (see HYEON-JEONG).
IDRIL f Literature
Means "sparkle brilliance" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
ILBERT m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Germanic given name HILDEBERT.
ILEANA f Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Possibly a Romanian variant of ELENA. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
ILINCA f Romanian
Romanian diminutive of ELENA.
ISKRA f Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
From a South Slavic word meaning "spark".
JAIR m Biblical, Biblical Portuguese, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "he shines" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a son of Manasseh and one of the ruling judges of the Israelites.
JAMSHID m Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Yima Kshaeta, which meant "shining JAM". This was the name of a mythological king of Persia. He is known as either Jamshid or Jam, where Jamshid is a combination of his original name and an honourific.
JELA f Serbian, Croatian, Slovak
Short form of JELENA or JELISAVETA. It also means "fir tree" in Serbian and Croatian.
JEĻENA f Latvian
Latvian form of YELENA.
JELENA f Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA in several languages. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JELKA f Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of JELENA. It also means "fir tree" in Slovene.
JEONG-HUI f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "right, proper, correct" or (jeong) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" combined with (hui) meaning "beauty" or (hui) meaning "bright, splendid, glorious". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
JOCHEBED f Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹכֶבֶד (Yokheved) meaning "YAHWEH is glory". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother of Miriam, Aaron and Moses.
JUNG-HEE f & m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 정희 (see JEONG-HUI).
JUPITER m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
KASHI f Indian, Hindi
From the name of a holy city in India, famous for its many temples dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Its name is derived from Sanskrit काशि (kashi) meaning "shining".
KAZUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
KEREN f Hebrew
Means "horn" or "ray of light" in Hebrew.
KHURSHID m & f Persian, Urdu, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Hvare Khshaeta meaning "shining sun". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata (or angel) who was associated with the sun.
KIDLAT m Filipino, Tagalog
Means "lightning" in Tagalog.
KOIT m Estonian
Means "dawn" in Estonian.
KOUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (kou) meaning "light" or (kou) meaning "happiness, good luck" combined with (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "brightness". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji characters as well.
KREŠIMIR m Croatian
From the Slavic elements kresu "spark, light, rouse" and miru "peace, world". This was the name of four kings of Croatia.
KUNIBERT m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuni "clan, family" and beraht "bright".
LAMBERT m German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements landa "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LAMIA (1) f Arabic
Means "shining, radiant" in Arabic.
LĀSMA f Latvian
From Latvian lāsmot meaning "to sparkle".
LÉAN f Irish
Irish form of HELEN.
LEENA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian short form of HELENA or MATLEENA.
LENA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENE f German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE.
LENI f German
German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA.
LENKA f Czech, Slovak
Originally a diminutive of MAGDALÉNA or HELENA. It is now used as an independent name.
LENUȚA f Romanian
Romanian diminutive of ELENA.
LEOCADIA f Spanish, Late Roman
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LESYA f Ukrainian
Diminutive of OLEKSANDRA.
LI (1) f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "reason, logic", () meaning "stand, establish", () meaning "black, dawn", () meaning "power, capability, influence" (which is usually only masculine) or () meaning "beautiful" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
LIOR m & f Hebrew
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
LUCASTA f Literature
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
LUCE f Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LUCIA f Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCINA f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
LUCIUS m Ancient Roman, Biblical, English
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was derived from Latin lux "light". This was the most popular of the praenomina. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known simply as Seneca), a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius. Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance.
LUCY f English
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LUGUS m Celtic Mythology
Probably from early Celtic meaning "light", ultimately from the Indo-European root *leuk "light, brightness". This was the name of a Celtic (Gaulish) god of commerce and craftsmanship, who was equated by the Romans with Mercury. He probably forms the basis for the characters and names of Lugh (Irish) and Lleu (Welsh).
LUMINIȚA f Romanian
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.
LUNINGNING f Filipino, Tagalog
Means "brilliance" in Tagalog.
LUX f & m Various
Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".
LUZ f Spanish
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".
MARDUK m Semitic Mythology
Probably from Sumerian amar-Utuk meaning "calf of Utu", derived from amar combined with the name of the sun god UTU. This was the name of the chief Babylonian god, presiding over heaven, light, sky, battle, and fertility. After killing the dragon Tiamat, who was an old enemy of the gods, he created the world and sky from the pieces of her body.
MARISOL f Spanish
Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".
MERRILL m English
From an English surname that was derived either from the given name MURIEL or from place names meaning "pleasant hill".
MERYL f English
Variant of MURIEL, influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.
MEYER m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew מֵאִיר (see MEIR). It also coincides with a German surname meaning "mayor, leader".
MING m & f Chinese
From Chinese (míng) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (míng) meaning "inscribe, engrave", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly.
MINH m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (minh) meaning "bright". A famous bearer was the communist revolutionary Ho Chi Minh (1890-1969).
MITHRA m Persian Mythology
Derived from an Indo-Iranian root *mitra meaning "oath, alliance, friend". In Persian mythology he was a god of light and friendship, the son of the supreme god Ahura Mazda. Worship of him eventually spread outside of Persia, where it was known as Mithraism.
MITSUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (mitsu) meaning "light" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MUIREALL f Scottish
Scottish form of MUIRGEL.
MUIRGEL f Irish
Means "bright sea", derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and geal "bright".
MUIRGHEAL f Irish
Modern form of MUIRGEL.
MUNIR m Arabic
Means "bright, shining" in Arabic.
MURIEL f English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name that was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
MURIELLE f French
French variant of MURIEL.
MYEONG m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (myeong) meaning "bright, light, clear" or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. Although it does appear rarely as a single-character name, it is more often used in combination with another character.
NADRA f Arabic
Means "radiance" in Arabic.
NAJM m Arabic
Means "star" in Arabic.
NAJMA f Arabic
Feminine form of NAJM.
NARANGEREL f Mongolian
Means "sun light" in Mongolian.
NIAMH f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NISHANT m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "night's end, dawn" in Sanskrit.
NOGAH m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "brightness" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of King David in the Old Testament.
NOOR (1) f & m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu نور (see NUR).
NOR (1) f & m Malay
Malay variant of NUR.
NORBERT m German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord meaning "north" and beraht meaning "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
NUR f & m Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
NURASYL m Kazakh (Rare)
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and асыл (asyl) meaning "precious, noble".
NURAY f Turkish
Means "bright moon" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Turkic ay meaning "moon".
NURCAN f Turkish
Means "bright soul" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian jan meaning "soul, life".
NURGÜL f Turkish
Means "radiant rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
NURI m Arabic
Means "my light" in Arabic.
NURISLAM m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with Islam, the name of the religion (ultimately from Arabic إسلام).
NURLAN m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and ұлан (ulan) meaning "soldier".
NURUL m & f Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with نور ال (Nur al) meaning "light of the" (such as نور الدين (Nur al-Din) "light of religion").
NURZHAN m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and жан (zhan) meaning "soul" (of Persian origin).
OCHIENG m Eastern African, Luo
Means "born when the sun shines", derived from Luo chieng meaning "sun".
OLENA f Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of HELEN.
OR m & f Hebrew
Means "light" in Hebrew.
ORAH f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אוֹרָה (see ORA (2)).
OREL m Hebrew
Means "light of God" in Hebrew.
ORI m & f Hebrew
Means "my light" in Hebrew.
ORIT f Hebrew
Means "light" in Hebrew.
ORLI f Hebrew
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
OSBERT m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman Conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
PERICLES m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Περικλης (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περι (peri) "around, exceedingly" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
PHAEDRA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
PHAENNA f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φαεινος (phaeinos) "shining". According to some Greek myths this was the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
PHOEBE f English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOEBUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβος (Phoibos), which meant "bright, pure". This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo.
PHOTINE f Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)). This is the name traditionally given to the Samaritan woman Jesus met at the well (see John 4:7). She is venerated as a saint by the Eastern Church.
PHOTIOS m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)).
PRABHAT m Indian, Hindi
Means "shining forth, morning" in Sanskrit.
PRADIP m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit प्रदीप (pradipa) meaning "light, lantern".
PRAKASH m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Gujarati, Bengali, Odia, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit प्रकाश (prakasha) meaning "light, bright, shining".
PRATAP m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "heat, splendour, glory" in Sanskrit.
PRATIBHA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "light, splendour, intelligence" in Sanskrit.
QUIDEL m Native American, Mapuche
Means "burning torch" in Mapuche.
RAINBOW f English (Rare)
From the English word for the arc of multicoloured light that can appear in a misty sky.
RAMBERT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hramn "raven" and beraht "bright".
RAY m English
Short form of RAYMOND, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
ROBERT m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROSHAN m & f Persian, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "light, bright" in Persian.
ROXANA f English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).
SÄDE f Finnish
Means "ray of light" in Finnish.
SAHAR f Arabic, Persian
Means "dawn" in Arabic.
SANAA (1) f Arabic
Means "brilliance, radiance, splendour" in Arabic.
SARANGEREL f Mongolian
Means "moonlight" in Mongolian.
SATOMI f Japanese
From Japanese (sato) meaning "village" or (sato) meaning "intelligent, clever, bright" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SEHER f Turkish
Turkish form of SAHAR.
SHACHAR f & m Hebrew
Means "dawn" in Hebrew.
SHAHAR f & m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew שַׁחַר (see SHACHAR).
SHAM'A f Arabic
Means "lamp" or "candle" in Arabic.
SHERAGA m Jewish
Means "light, candle" in Aramaic.
SHERWOOD m English
From an English place name (or from a surname that was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SHIRLEY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SHRAGA m Jewish
Alternate transcription of Hebrew שְׁרַגָא (see SHERAGA).
SHRI f Hinduism
Means "diffusing light, radiance, beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi. This word is also commonly used as a title of respect in India.
SIEGBERT m German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.