Names Categorized "virtues"

This is a list of names in which the categories include virtues.
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ADALET   f   Turkish
Means "justice" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic.
AFAF   f   Arabic
Means "chastity" in Arabic.
AFIF   m   Arabic
Means "chaste" in Arabic.
AGAMEMNON   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly meaning "very steadfast" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was the brother of Menelaus. He led the Greek expedition to Troy to recover his brother's wife Helen. After the Trojan War Agamemnon was killed by his wife Clytemnestra.
AGE (2)   f   Estonian
Estonian form of AGNES.
AGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of AGNES or AGATHA.
ÁGI   f   Hungarian
Diminutive of ÁGOTA or ÁGNES.
AGNĖ   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of AGNES.
ÁGNES   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of AGNES.
AGNÈS   f   French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AGNESA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of AGNES.
AGNESE   f   Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGNESSA   f   Russian
Russian form of AGNES.
AGNETA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of AGNES.
AGNETE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
AGNEZA   f   Croatian
Croatian form of AGNES.
AGNIESZKA   f   Polish
Polish form of AGNES.
AGNIJA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AHAVA   f   Hebrew
Means "love" in Hebrew.
AI (1)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AI (2)   f   Chinese
From Chinese (ài) meaning "love, affection", (ǎi) meaning "friendly, lush", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
AIGNÉIS   f   Irish
Irish form of AGNES.
AITOR   m   Basque
Possibly means "good fathers" from Basque aita "father" and on "good". This was the name of a legendary ancestor of the Basques.
AKI (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
ALAIA   f   Basque
Means "joyful, happy" in Basque.
ALCMENE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκμηνη (Alkmene), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and μηνη (mene) "moon". In Greek mythology Alcmene was the wife of Amphitryon. She was the mother of Herakles by Zeus, who bedded her by disguising himself as her absent husband.
ALKMENE   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of ALCMENE.
AMAL (1)   f & m   Arabic
Means "hope, aspiration" in Arabic. It is related to Amaal.
AMARA   f   Western African, Igbo
Means "grace" in Igbo.
AMIKA   f   Esperanto
Means "friendly" in Esperanto.
AMITY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
AN (1)   m & f   Chinese, Vietnamese
From Chinese (ān) meaning "peace, quiet" or other characters with a similar pronunciation. As a Vietnamese name, it is derived from Sino-Vietnamese meaning "safe, secure".
ANIS   m   Arabic
Means "friendly, friend" in Arabic.
ANNICE   f   English
Variant of ANNIS.
ANNIS   f   English
Medieval English form of AGNES.
ANNORA   f   English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ARI (3)   m   Armenian
Means "brave" in Armenian.
ARMO   m   Finnish (Rare)
Means "grace, mercy" in Finnish.
ARNFRIED   m   German (Rare)
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
ARNIFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ARNFRIED.
ASHA (1)   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
AUGUSTUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. This was also the name of three kings of Poland.
AUNE   f   Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
BAI   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
BAO   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
BASIL (2)   m   Arabic
Means "brave, valiant" in Arabic.
BASIR   m   Arabic
Means "wise" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition البصير (al-Basir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
BELINDA   f   English
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related Italian bella "beautiful". The second element could be related to Germanic lind "serpent, dragon" or linde "soft, tender". This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem 'The Rape of the Lock' (1712).
BLAZH   m   Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic name derived from the Slavic element blagu meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BOGUMIŁ   m   Polish
Means "favoured by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and milu "gracious, dear".
BONACCORSO   m   Italian
From a medieval Italian name derived from bono "good" and accorso "haste, rush, help".
BONNIE   f   English
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
BRANIMIR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
BRAVA   f   Esperanto
Means "valiant, brave" in Esperanto.
CAOIMHE   f   Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CARITA   f   Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
CHARES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
CHARIS   f   Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARISMA   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χαρις (charis) "grace, kindness".
CHARITY   f   English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHASITY   f   English
Variant of CHASTITY.
CHASTITY   f   English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the daughter of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
CHENG   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (chéng) meaning "completed, finished, succeeded" or (chéng) meaning "sincere, honest, true", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CHIKA (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
CLEMENCY   f   English (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
CONCORDIA   f   Roman Mythology
Means "harmony" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of harmony and peace.
CONLETH   m   Irish
Modern form of the old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "chaste fire" from Gaelic connla "chaste" and aodh "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
CONLEY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CONLETH.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CONSTANCE   f   English, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CONSTANS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "constant, steadfast". This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor, a son of Constantine the Great.
COSMAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κοσμας (Kosmas), which was derived from κοσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
CURTIS   m   English
From an English surname which originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
DANA (4)   m & f   Persian, Arabic
Means "wise" in Persian.
DARIUS   m   English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.... [more]
DECEBAL   m   Romanian
Means "powerful, brave" in Dacian. This was the name adopted by Diurpaneus, a 1st-century king of Dacia. For many years he successfully resisted Roman expansion into his territory but was finally defeated by the forces of emperor Trajan in 106.
DOBROMIL   m   Czech (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and milu "gracious, dear".
EGILHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge of a sword" and hard "brave, hardy".
EIR   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Norwegian
Means "mercy" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse goddess of healing and medicine.
EKKEHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ag "edge" and hard "brave, hardy".
EMER   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Gaelic eimh "swift". In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.
ENOCH   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name חֲנוֹך (Chanokh) meaning "dedicated". In Genesis in the Old Testament this is the name of both the son of Cain and the father of Methuselah, who was the supposed author of the apocryphal Books of Enoch.
ERDOĞAN   m   Turkish
From Turkish er "brave man" and doğan "falcon".
ERKAN   m   Turkish
From Turkish er "brave man" and kan "blood".
ESMOND   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
EUCLID   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ευκλειδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and κλεος (kleos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
EUDORA   f   Greek Mythology
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements ευ (eu) "good" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
EUDOXIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good repute, good judgement" from Greek ευδοξος (eudoxos), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοξα (doxa) "notion, reputation, honour, glory".
EUGENE   m   English
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευγενιος (Eugenios) which was derived from the Greek word ευγενης (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and γενης (genes) "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.... [more]
EUN   m & f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" or (eun) meaning "silver, money", as well as other hanja characters which are pronounced in the same way. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
EUNICE   f   Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευνικη (Eunike) which meant "good victory" from ευ (eu) "good" and νικη (nike) "victory". The New Testament mentions her as the mother of Timothy. As an English name, it was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
EUN-JI   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" combined with (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "earth, soil, ground". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
EUN-YEONG   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" and (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
EUN-YOUNG   f   Korean
Variant transcription of EUN-YEONG.
EUPHEMIA   f   Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUSTORGIO   m   Italian
From Eustorgius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευστοργιος (Eustorgios), which was from the word ευστοργος (eustorgos) meaning "content", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and στεργω (stergo) "to love, to be content". Saint Eustorgius was a 6th-century bishop of Milan.
EUTHYMIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευθυμιος (Euthymios) which meant "in good spirits", derived from the word ευθυμος (euthymos), which was composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and θυμος (thymos) "soul, spirit". This was the name of several early saints.
EVADNE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), which is of unknown meaning, though the first element is derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVERARD   m   English (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
FAITH   f   English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
FARAH   m & f   Arabic
Means "joy" in Arabic.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FIDEL   m   Spanish
From the Late Latin name Fidelis which meant "faithful". A famous bearer was revolutionary leader Fidel Castro (1926-2016), the former president of Cuba.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
GALEN   m   English
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene). It was borne by a 2nd-century BC Greco-Roman physician who contributed to anatomy and medicine. In modern times the name is occasionally given in his honour.
GARBI   f   Basque
Means "clean, pure" in Basque.
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with hard meaning "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERFRIED   m   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and frid "peace".
GERLINDE   f   German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with linde meaning "soft, tender".
GIOIA   f   Italian
Means "joy" in Italian.
GLENYS   f   Welsh
Elaboration of the Welsh word glân meaning "pure, clean, holy". This name was created in the late 19th century.
GRACE   f   English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GRACIA   f   Spanish
Means "grace" in Spanish, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRATIA   f   German
Means "grace" in Latin.
GRATIAN   m   History
From the Roman name Gratianus, which meant "grace" from Latin gratus. Saint Gratian was the first bishop of Tours (4th century). This was also the name of a Roman emperor.
GRAZIA   f   Italian
Means "grace" in Italian, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRAZIELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GRAZIA.
GUISCARD   m   Medieval French
Norman French form of the Norman name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr "wise" and hórðr "brave, hardy".
GUIYING   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (guì) meaning "laurel, cassia, cinnamon" combined with (yīng) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed from other character combinations as well.
GWENAËL   m   French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
GWENDA   f   Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 20th century.
GYEONG   m & f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city", (gyeong) meaning "scenery, view", (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour", or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
HAGNE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of AGNES.
HALIM   m   Arabic
Means "patient, tolerant, mild" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الحليم (al-Halim) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
HANAN (2)   f   Arabic
Means "mercy, compassion" in Arabic.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HARDY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Middle English hardi "brave, hardy".
HARMONY   f   English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HARTMANN   m   German
Means "brave man", derived from the Germanic element hard "brave, hardy" combined with man.
HASAN   m   Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian
Means "handsome", derived from Arabic حسن (hasuna) meaning "to be beautiful, to be good". Hasan was the son of Ali and the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. He was poisoned by one of his wives and is regarded as a martyr by Shia Muslims. This was also the name of two kings of Morocco. It is sometimes transcribed as Hassan, though this is a distinct name in Arabic.
HE   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
HIROSHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations which are read the same way.
HONOKA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hono) meaning "harmony" (using an obscure nanori reading) and (ka) meaning "flower", as well as other combinations of kanji which have the same pronunciation. Very often it is written using the hiragana writing system.
HONOR   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.
HONORA   f   Irish, English
Variant of HONORIA. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
HONORIA   f   Late Roman
Feminine form of HONORIUS.
HONORIUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name which meant "honour". This was the name of an emperor of the Western Roman Empire. It was also borne by a few early saints and four popes.
HONOUR   f   English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
HOPE   f   English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
HRÓARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name, derived from the element hróðr "fame" combined with either geirr "spear" (making it a relation of HRÓÐGEIRR), arr "warrior" or varr "vigilant, cautious". This is the name of a legendary Danish king, the same one who is featured in the Anglo-Saxon poem 'Beowulf' with the name Hroðgar.
HUGHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and hard "brave, hardy".
HULDA (1)   f   Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
HUMPHREY   m   English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.
HUMPHRY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUMPHREY.
HUNFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of HUMPHREY.
HYEON-JEONG   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" or (hyeon) meaning "shine, glitter" combined with (jeong) meaning "court" or (jeong) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYEON-JU   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" and (ju) meaning "jewel, pearl". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYEON-U   m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" or (hyeon) meaning "manifest, clear" combined with (u) meaning "divine intervention, protection" or (u) meaning "rain". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYUN-JOO   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of HYEON-JU.
HYUN-JUNG   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of HYEON-JEONG.
IDONEA   f   English (Archaic)
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century.
IINES   f   Finnish
Finnish form of AGNES.
IMAN   m & f   Arabic, Persian, Indonesian
Means "faith", derived from Arabic امن (amuna) meaning "to be faithful".
IMANI   f & m   Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means "faith" in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
INÉS   f   Spanish
Spanish form of AGNES.
INÈS   f   French
French form of INÉS.
INÊS   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of AGNES.
INES   f   Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
INEZ   f   English
English form of INÉS.
IRA (1)   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.
JAGIENKA   f   Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JAGNA   f   Polish
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JAGUSIA   f   Polish (Rare)
Diminutive of AGNIESZKA.
JANJA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of AGNES. It also may be inspired by Serbo-Croatian janje meaning "lamb".
JEONG   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" or (jeong) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
JEONG-SUK   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal" or (jeong) meaning "right, proper, correct" combined with (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja combinations are possible.
JI-MIN   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JING   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (jìng) meaning "quiet, still, gentle", (jīng) meaning "essence, spirit", (jīng) meaning "clear, crystal" or (jīng) meaning "capital city". Other characters can also form this name.
JINGYI   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (jìng) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" combined with () meaning "joy, harmony". Other character combinations are possible as well.
JI-YEONG   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend" combined with (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper". Many other hanja character combinations are possible.
JI-YOUNG   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of JI-YEONG.
JONG   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of JEONG.
JOY   f   English
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JUDA   m   Arabic
Means "goodness, excellence", derived from Arabic جاد (jada) "to be excellent".
JUNG   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of JEONG.
JUNG-SOOK   f   Korean
Variant transcription of JEONG-SUK.
JUSTICE   m & f   English
From an occupational surname which meant "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
JUSTUS   m   German, Dutch, Late Roman
Latin name which meant "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KARIM   m   Arabic, Persian
Means "generous, noble" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الكريم (al-Karim) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
KASUMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (kasumi) meaning "mist". It can also come from (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" combined with (sumi) meaning "clear, pure". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KAVI   m   Indian, Hindi
From a title for a a poet, meaning "wise man, sage, poet" in Sanskrit.
KAZUKI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
KEMEN   m   Basque
Means "courage, vigour" in Basque.
KIYOSHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (kiyoshi) or (kiyoshi) both meaning "pure". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
KRASIMIR   m   Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements krasa "beauty, adornment" and miru "peace, world".
KYO   m & f   Japanese
Variant transcription of KYOU.
KYOU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (kyou) meaning "unite, cooperate", (kyou) meaning "capital city", (kyou) meaning "village", (kyou) meaning "apricot", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
KYUNG   m & f   Korean
Variant transcription of GYEONG.
LÀNH   m & f   Vietnamese
Means "good, favourable, gentle" in Vietnamese.
LATIF   m   Arabic
Means "gentle, kind" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition اللطيف (al-Latif) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
LELLE   m   Swedish
Diminutive of LENNART.
LEMPI   f   Finnish
Means "love" in Finnish.
LEN   m   English
Short form of LEONARD.
LENARD   m   English
Variant of LEONARD.
LENART   m   Slovene
Slovene form of LEONARD.
LENNARD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of LEONARD.
LENNART   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENNIE   m   English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LENNY   m   English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LEOFDÆG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
LÉONARD   m   French
French form of LEONARD.
LEONARD   m   English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements levon "lion" and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, though it did not become common there until the 19th century.
LEONARDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONHARD   m   German
German form of LEONARD. Leonhard Euler was a Swiss mathematician who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LÉOPOLD   m   French
French form of LEOPOLD.
LEOPOLD   m   German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LEOPOLDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEOPOLD.
LETITIA   f   English
From the Late Latin name Laetitia which meant "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LEUDBALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LEOPOLD.
LIBER   m   Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin liber meaning "free". This was the name of a Roman fertility god, often identified with Dionysus.
LIBERTY   f   English
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).
LILY   f   English
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LIUPOLD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LEOPOLD.
LOVE (2)   f   English
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
LUBOMÍR   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements lyuby "love" and miru "peace, world".
LUCASTA   f   Literature
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
LUITPOLD   m   German (Rare)
German variant of LEOPOLD.
MAI (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mai) meaning "dance" or 麻衣 (mai) meaning "linen robe". It can also come from (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ai) meaning "love, affection". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
MAKOTO   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (makoto) meaning "sincerity", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.
MANFRED   m   German, Dutch, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred' (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MERCY   f   English
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
MILA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILAN   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch, Hungarian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILES   m   English
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".
MILIVOJ   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious" and voji "soldier".
MILOSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and slava "glory".
MIN   m & f   Chinese, Korean
From (mǐn) meaning "quick, clever, sharp", (mín) meaning "people, citizens", or other Chinese/Sino-Korean characters which are pronounced similarly.
MIRA (2)   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIROSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MODESTY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
NADEZHDA   f   Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Means "hope" in Slavic.
NATSUKI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NENSI   f   Croatian
Croatian form of NANCY.
NES   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AGNES.
NESKE   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish diminutive of AGNES.
NEST   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTA   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NEŽA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of AGNES.
NOAM   m & f   Hebrew
Means "pleasantness" in Hebrew. A famous bearer is Noam Chomsky (1928-), an American linguist and philosopher.
NOBLE   m   English
From an English surname meaning "noble, notable". The name can also be given in direct reference to the English word noble.
NYARAI   f   Southern African, Shona
Means "be humble" in Shona.
OANEZ   f   Breton
Derived from Breton oan "lamb" (ultimately from Latin agnus) and used as a Breton form of AGNES.
ODOVACAR   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audovacar meaning "wealthy and vigilant", derived from the elements aud "wealth" and wacar "vigilant". Odovacar, also called Odoacer, was a 5th-century Gothic leader who overthrew the last Western Roman emperor and became the first barbarian king of Italy.
ONFROI   m   Medieval French
Norman French form of HUMPHREY.
ONUR   m   Turkish
Means "honour" in Turkish.
OTHNIEL   m   Biblical
Means "lion of God" or "strength of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a nephew of Caleb who becomes the first of the ruling judges of the Israelites.
PACE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
PANTELEIMON   m   Late Greek
From Greek παν (pan) meaning "all" (genitive παντος) and ελεημων (eleemon) meaning "compassionate". This was a name given to Saint Pantaleon.
PATIENCE   f   English
From the English word patience, ultimately from Latin patientia, a derivative of pati "to suffer". This was one of the virtue names coined by the Puritans in the 17th century.
PAX   f   Roman Mythology
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
PAZ (1)   f   Spanish
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".
PEACE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word peace, ultimately derived from Latin pax.
PEGASUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Πηγασος (Pegasos), possibly either from πηγος (pegos) "strong" or πηγαιος (pegaios) "from a water spring". In Greek mythology Pegasus was the winged horse that sprang from the blood of Medusa after she was killed by Perseus. There is a constellation in the northern sky named after the horse.
PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PIETY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "piety, devoutness". This was a rare virtue name used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
PLACIDO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Placidus which meant "quiet, calm".
POLDI   m   German
German diminutive of LEOPOLD.
POLYXENA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πολυξενη (Polyxene) which was from the word πολυξενος (polyxenos) meaning "entertaining many guests, very hospitable", itself derived from πολυς (polys) "many" and ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest". In Greek legend she was a daughter of Priam and Hecuba, beloved by Achilles. After the Trojan War, Achilles' son Neoptolemus sacrificed her.
PRAXIS   f   Greek Mythology
Means "practical" in Greek. This was another name for the Greek goddess Aphrodite.
PRITI   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "pleasure, joy, love" in Sanskrit.
PRUDENCE   f & m   English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
QADIR   m   Arabic
Means "capable, powerful" in Arabic. This transcription represents two different ways of spelling the name in Arabic. In Islamic tradition القادر (al-Qadir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
RADOMIL   m   Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rad "happy, willing" and milu "gracious, dear".
RADOMIR   m   Serbian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
RADOVAN   m   Slovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
RAJA (1)   f   Arabic
Means "hope" in Arabic.
RATIMIR   m   Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rati meaning "war, battle" and miru meaning "peace, world".
RAUF   m   Arabic
Means "compassionate" in Arabic.
REINA (2)   f   Yiddish
Derived from Yiddish רֵײן (rein) meaning "clean, pure". It is sometimes used as a Yiddish form of KATHERINE.
REYNARD   m   English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
RHONDA   f   English
Probably intended to mean "good spear" from Welsh rhon "spear" and da "good", but possibly influenced by the name of the Rhondda Valley in South Wales, which means "noisy". It has been in use only since the 20th century. Its use may have been partially inspired by Margaret Mackworth, Viscountess Rhondda (1883-1956), a British feminist.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "reason, logic" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
RINA (2)   f   Hebrew
Means "joy" in Hebrew.
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
RON (2)   m & f   Hebrew
Means "song, joy" in Hebrew.
RONG   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese (róng) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper", (róng) meaning "fuse, harmonize" or (róng) meaning "appearance, form" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well.
ROSAMOND   f   English
Variant of ROSAMUND, in use since the Middle Ages.
ROSAMUND   f   English (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ROSEMONDE   f   French
French form of ROSAMUND.
ROSMUNDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSAMUND.
ROSTAM   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly from Avestan raodha "to grow" and takhma "strong, brave, valiant". Rostam was a warrior hero in Persian legend. The 11th-century Persian poet Firdausi recorded his tale in the 'Shahnameh'.
RYOUTA   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ryou) meaning "cool, refreshing", (ryou) meaning "clear" or (ryou) meaning "good" combined with (ta) meaning "thick, big". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
SACHIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sachi) meaning "happiness, good luck" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SADB   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SAFI   m   Arabic
Means "pure" in Arabic.
SAKI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "blossom" and (ki) meaning "hope", besides other combinations of kanji characters.
SAKURA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.
SALAH   m   Arabic
Means "righteousness" in Arabic.
SALOME   f   English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.... [more]
SATOMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sato) meaning "village" or (sato) meaning "intelligent, clever, bright" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
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