Names Categorized "isograms"

This is a list of names in which the categories include isograms.
gender
usage
Abdou m Western African, Northern African
Form of Abduh common in western and northern Africa.
Abdoul m Western African
Form of Abdul used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
Abduh m Arabic
Means "his servant" in Arabic.
Abdul m Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Uzbek, Bengali, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with عبد ال ('Abd al) meaning "servant of the" (such as عبد العزيز ('Abd al-'Aziz) meaning "servant of the powerful").
Ábel m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Abel.
Abel m English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
Abeni f Western African, Yoruba
Means "we prayed and we received" in Yoruba.
Abi f English
Diminutive of Abigail (typically British).
Abiel m Biblical
Means "God is my father" in Hebrew. This was the name of the grandfather of Saul in the Old Testament.
Abigél f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Abigail.
Abner m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew, from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and נֵר (ner) meaning "lamp, light". In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. After he killed Asahel he was himself slain by Asahel's brother Joab. It has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. It was popular with the Puritans, who brought it to America in the 17th century.
Ace 1 m English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
Ace 2 m Macedonian
Macedonian diminutive of Aleksandar.
Adelyn f English (Modern)
Variant of Adeline using the popular name suffix lyn.
Adino m Biblical
Means "ornament" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of King David's mighty men.
Adolf m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
Adolph m English
English form of Adolf, rarely used since World War II.
Adriel m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "flock of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a man who married Saul's daughter Merab.
Adrien m French
French form of Adrian.
Ælfric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "ruler".
Ælfwine m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman Conquest.
Æðelstan m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, the first to rule all of England. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, though it enjoyed a modest revival (as Athelstan) in the 19th century.
Aghi m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ove.
Ági f Hungarian
Diminutive of Ágota or Ágnes.
Agi m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ag meaning "edge of a sword".
Agmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Amund.
Ágnes f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Agnes.
Agnès f French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of Agnes.
Agnes f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
Agni 1 m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fire" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the ancient Hindu fire god, usually depicted as red-skinned with three legs, seven arms, and two faces.
Agni 2 f Greek
Modern Greek form of Agnes.
Ågot f Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian variant form of Agatha.
Ahmed m Turkish, Bosnian, Dhivehi, Bengali, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto
Variant of Ahmad. This was the name of three Ottoman sultans.
Ahmet m Turkish
Turkish form of Ahmad.
Ahti m Finnish, Estonian, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
Ai 1 f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
Ai 2 f Chinese
From Chinese (ài) meaning "love, affection", (ǎi) meaning "friendly, lush", or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Aibek m Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Derived from Turkic ay "moon" combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
Aike m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
Aiko f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other character combinations.
Aimo m Finnish
Means "generous amount" in Finnish.
Aingeru m Basque
Basque form of Angelus (see Angel).
Ainsley f & m Scottish, English (Modern)
From an English surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".... [more]
Ajit m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali
Means "unconquered, invincible", from Sanskrit (a) meaning "not" and जित (jita) meaning "conquered". This is a name of the gods Shiva and Vishnu, and of a future Buddha.
Ajith m Tamil, Indian, Malayalam
Southern Indian form of Ajit.
Akemi f Japanese
From Japanese (ake) meaning "bright" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Aki 1 m Finnish
Short form of Joakim.
Aki 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
Akim m Russian
Russian form of Joachim.
Akio m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "bright, luminous" combined with (o) meaning "man, husband", (o) meaning "male" or (o) meaning "hero, manly". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Akoni m Hawaiian
Short form of Anakoni.
Alberich m Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and ric "ruler, mighty". Alberich was the name of the sorcerer king of the dwarfs in Germanic mythology. He also appears in the Nibelungenlied as a dwarf who guards the treasure of the Nibelungen.
Alberico m Italian
Italian form of Alberich.
Albert m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert meaning "noble and bright", composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
Albertus m Ancient Germanic (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of Adalbert (see Albert). This is the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Albert in daily life.
Albie m English
Diminutive of Albert.
Albin m Swedish, French, English, Slovene, Polish
Form of Albinus in several languages.
Albine f French
French form of Albina.
Albino m Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of Albinus.
Albinus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of Albus. Saint Albinus (also called Aubin) was a 6th-century bishop of Angers in Brittany.
Alboin m Ancient Germanic
Form of Alfwin. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Lombards who began the Lombard conquest of Italy.
Albrecht m German
German cognate of Albert.
Albus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
Alby m Irish
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Alden m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given name Ealdwine.
Aldert m Frisian, Dutch
Frisian form of a Germanic name, either Aldhard or Adalhard.
Aldin m Bosnian
Bosnian form of Ala ad-Din.
Aldo m Italian, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ald "old", and possibly also with adal "noble".
Aldous m English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
Alec m English
Short form of Alexander.
Aleix m Catalan
Catalan form of Alexis.
Aleixo m Portuguese (Rare), Galician (Rare)
Portuguese and Galician form of Alexis.
Alejo m Spanish
Spanish form of Alexis.
Alekos m Greek
Diminutive of Alexandros.
Aleksi m Finnish, Bulgarian, Georgian
Finnish, Bulgarian and Georgian form of Alexis.
Aleksy m Polish
Polish form of Alexis.
Alem m Bosnian
Bosnian form of Alim.
Alen m Croatian, Slovene, Armenian
Croatian, Slovene and Armenian form of Alan.
Alex m & f English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Short form of Alexander, Alexandra and other names beginning with Alex.
Alexios m Ancient Greek
Greek form of Alexius.
Alexis m & f French, English, Greek, Spanish, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Ἄλεξις (Alexis) meaning "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Ἀλέξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
Alexius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξιος (Alexios), a derivative of Ἄλεξις (see Alexis). This was the name of five Byzantine emperors. It was also borne by a 5th-century Syrian saint who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.
Alf 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr meaning "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
Alf 2 m English
Short form of Alfred.
Alf 3 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of Adolf.
Alfeo m Italian
Italian form of Alphaeus.
Alfio m Italian
Italian form of Alphius.
Alfr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Alf 1.
Alfred m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Means "elf counsel", derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
Alfredo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Alfred.
Alfvin m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and vinr "friend".
Alfwin m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements alf "elf" and win "friend".
Alger m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name Algar.
Alice f English, French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Czech, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see Adelaide). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Alim m Arabic, Turkish, Azerbaijani, Circassian, Uyghur
Means "learned, expert, scholar" in Arabic.
Aline f French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of Adeline. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of Eileen. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
Alise 1 f Latvian
Latvian form of Alice.
Almir 1 m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian variant of Almiro.
Almir 2 m Bosnian
Bosnian form of Al-Amir.
Almiro m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Adelmar.
Alois m German, Czech
German and Czech form of Aloysius.
Alojz m Slovene, Slovak, Croatian
Slovene, Slovak and Croatian form of Aloysius.
Alojzy m Polish
Polish form of Aloysius.
Aloys m Medieval Occitan
Medieval Occitan form of Louis.
Alphius m Late Roman
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of Alphaeus, or possibly from an Umbrian root meaning "white". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Sicily.
Alton m English
From an Old English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
Alve m Swedish
Variant of Alf 1.
Alvin m English, Swedish
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names Ælfwine, Æðelwine or Ealdwine. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the Old English names. As a Scandinavian name it is derived from Alfvin, an Old Norse cognate of Ælfwine.
Alvis m Norse Mythology, Latvian
From the Old Norse Alvíss meaning "all wise". In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf who was to marry Thor's daughter Thrud. Thor was not pleased with this so he tricked Alvis by asking him questions until the sun rose, at which time the dwarf was turned into stone.
Alvise m Italian
Venetian form of Louis.
Alwin m German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From either of the two Germanic names Alfwin or Adalwin.
Alwine f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Alwin.
Amber f English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
Amberly f English (Modern)
Elaboration of Amber, influenced by the spelling of the name Kimberly.
Ambre f French
French cognate of Amber.
Amel 1 m Bosnian
Bosnian masculine form of Amal 1.
Amel 2 f Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic أمال (see Amaal) chiefly used in Northern Africa.
Américo m Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of Amerigo.
Amerigo m Italian
Medieval Italian form of Emmerich. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).
Amery m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Emery.
Ami 1 m Biblical
Means "trustworthy, reliable" in Hebrew. This was the name of a servant of King Solomon in the Old Testament.
Ami 2 f English
Variant of Amy.
Ami 3 f Japanese
From Japanese (a) meaning "second, Asia" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Ami 4 m Hebrew
Means "my people" or "my nation" in Hebrew.
Amice f Medieval English
Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning "friend". This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon.
Amie f English
Variant of Amy.
Amin m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Derived from Arabic أمين (amin) meaning "truthful". This was the name of the sixth Abbasid caliph.
Amine 1 m Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic أمين (see Amin) chiefly used in Northern Africa.
Amine 2 f Turkish
Turkish form of Aminah 1.
Aminu m Western African, Hausa
Hausa form of Amin.
Amir 1 m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian, Bosnian
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.
Amir 2 m Hebrew
Means "treetop" in Hebrew.
Amit 1 m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Odia, Punjabi, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Means "immeasurable, infinite" in Sanskrit.
Amit 2 m & f Hebrew
Means "friend" in Hebrew.
Amleto m Italian
Italian form of Hamlet.
Amrit m Indian, Hindi
Means "immortal" from Sanskrit (a) meaning "not" and मृत (mrta) meaning "dead". In Hindu texts it refers to a drink that gives immortality.
Amund m Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Agmundr, from the element egg "edge of a sword" or agi "awe, terror" combined with mundr "protection".
Amy f English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
An 1 m & f Chinese, Vietnamese
From Chinese (ān) meaning "peace, quiet" or other characters with a similar pronunciation. As a Vietnamese name, it is derived from Sino-Vietnamese meaning "safe, secure".
An 2 m Sumerian Mythology
Means "heaven, sky" in Sumerian. An was the supreme Sumerian god of the heavens, the father of Enlil and Enki. His cuneiform sign 𒀭 (dingir) was prefixed to the names of other deities in writing, though it was not pronounced.
Anđelko m Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of Angel.
Anđelo m Croatian
Croatian form of Angel.
Andi f English
Diminutive of Andrea 2.
Andie m & f English
Diminutive of Andrew or Andrea 2.
Andile m & f Southern African, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele
Means "they have increased" in Zulu, Xhosa and Ndebele.
André m French, Portuguese, German, Dutch
French and Portuguese form of Andreas (see Andrew).
Andrew m English, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Ἀνδρέας (Andreas), which was derived from ἀνδρεῖος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.... [more]
Androcles m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀνδροκλῆς (Androkles) meaning "glory of a man", derived from ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a man who pulled a thorn from a lion's paw in one of Aesop's fables.
Andy m & f English
Diminutive of Andrew or sometimes Andrea 2. American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
Anej m Slovene
Slovene form of Aeneas.
Angel m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
Angelo m Italian
Italian form of Angelus (see Angel).
Angie f English
Diminutive of Angela.
Anh m & f Vietnamese
Often from Sino-Vietnamese (anh) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name is frequently combined with a middle name to create a compound name; the meaning of Anh can change depending on the Sino-Vietnamese characters underlying the compound.
Anil m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit अनिल (anila) meaning "air, wind". This is another name of Vayu, the Hindu god of the wind.
Anis m Arabic
Means "friendly, friend" in Arabic.
Anit m Indian, Hindi
Possibly means "not guided" in Sanskrit.
Anoubis m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Anapa (see Anubis).
Anri m Georgian
Georgian form of Henri.
Ansel m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Anselm. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).
Anselm m German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
Anselmo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Anselm.
Anshel m Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish form of Anselm, used as a vernacular form of Asher.
Ansobert m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of Osbert.
Antelmo m Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Anthelm.
Anthelm m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic element and meaning "wrath, zeal" combined with helm meaning "helmet, protection". Saint Anthelm was a 12th-century bishop of Belley in France.
Antiope f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek elements ἀντί (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". This was the name of several figures in Greek mythology, including a daughter of Ares who was one of the queens of the Amazons. She was kidnapped and married by Theseus.
Anu 1 f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of Anna.
Anu 2 m Semitic Mythology
Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian form of An 2, also adopted by the Hurrians and Hittites.
Anubis m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ἄνουβις (Anoubis), the Greek form of Egyptian jnpw (reconstructed as Anapa and other forms), which coincided with a word meaning "royal child, prince". However, it might alternatively be derived from the root jnp meaning "to decay". Anubis was the Egyptian god who led the dead to the underworld. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a jackal. The Greeks equated him with their god Hermes.
Aoife f Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Aífe, derived from oíph meaning "beauty" (modern Irish aoibh). This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a woman at war with Scáthach (her sister in some versions). She was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn, who spared her life on the condition that she bear him a child (Connla). Another legendary figure by this name appears in the Children of Lir as the jealous third wife of Lir.... [more]
Aphrodite f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phoenician origin. Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified with the Roman goddess Venus. She was the wife of Hephaestus and the mother of Eros, and she was often associated with the myrtle tree and doves. The Greeks connected her name with ἀφρός (aphros) meaning "foam", resulting in the story that she was born from the foam of the sea. Many of her characteristics are based on the goddess known as Ashtoreth to the Phoenicians and Ishtar to the Mesopotamian Semitic peoples, and on the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
Archie m Scottish, English
Diminutive of Archibald. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941. It was also used by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle for the name of their son born 2019.
Arduino m Italian
Italian form of Hartwin.
Ares m Greek Mythology
Perhaps from either Greek ἀρή (are) meaning "bane, ruin" or ἄρσην (arsen) meaning "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the bloodthirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
Arezou f Persian
Means "desire" in Persian.
Arezu f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian آرزو (see Arezou).
Ari 1 m Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
Ari 2 m Old Norse, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
Ari 3 m Armenian
Means "brave" in Armenian.
Arie 1 m Dutch
Diminutive of Adriaan.
Arie 2 m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אַרְיֵה (see Arieh).
Arieh m Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew. This is the name of an officer of King Pekahiah in the Old Testament.
Ariel m & f Hebrew, English, French, Spanish, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play The Tempest (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Disney film The Little Mermaid (1989).
Aries m Roman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
Arik m Hebrew
Diminutive of Ariel or Arieh.
Arin f & m English (Rare)
Variant of Erin or Aaron.
Aris 1 m Greek
Modern Greek form of Ares. It is also used as a short form of Aristotelis.
Aris 2 m Dutch
Diminutive of Adriaan.
Arlet f Catalan
Catalan form of Arlette.
Arline f English
Meaning unknown, possibly invented by Michael William Balfe for the main character in his opera The Bohemian Girl (1843).
Arlo m English
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem The Faerie Queene (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, meaning "between two highlands".
Armide f Literature
French form of Armida. This is the name of operas by Jean-Baptiste Lully (in 1686) and Christoph Willibald Gluck (in 1777), both of which were based on Jerusalem Delivered by Torquato Tasso.
Ármin m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Arminius.
Armin m German
Modern form of Arminius.
Armo m Finnish (Rare)
Means "grace, mercy" in Finnish.
Arne 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
Arne 2 m German
Diminutive of Arnold.
Árni m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Arne 1.
Arno m Dutch, German
Short form of Arnoud or Arnold.
Aron m Polish, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Polish, Croatian and Scandinavian form of Aaron.
Arsen m Armenian
Armenian form of Arsenios.
Arseni m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Арсений (see Arseniy).
Arsénio m Portuguese (European)
European Portuguese form of Arsenios.
Arsênio m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of Arsenios.
Arsenio m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Arsenios.
Arseniy m Russian
Russian form of Arsenios.
Arseny m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Арсений (see Arseniy).
Artemis f Greek Mythology, Greek
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
Arushi f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit अरुष (arusha) meaning "reddish, dawn", a word used in the Rigveda to describe the red horses of Agni. This name also appears in the Hindu epic the Mahabharata belonging to a daughter of Manu and the wife of Chyavana, though in this case it might derive from Sanskrit आरुषी (arushi) meaning "hitting, killing".
Arwen f Literature
Means "noble maiden" in the fictional language Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.
Aryeh m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew אַרְיֵה (see Arieh).
Arzu f Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur form of Arezou.
Ash m & f English
Short form of Ashley. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
Asher m Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
Åshild f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Áshildr, derived from the elements áss "god" and hildr "battle".
Áshildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åshild.
Ashley f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. It reached its height of popularity in America in 1987, but it did not become the highest ranked name until 1991, being overshadowed by the likewise-popular Jessica until then. In the United Kingdom it is still more common as a masculine name.
Ashling f Irish
Anglicized form of Aisling.
Ashton m & f English (Modern)
From an English surname, itself derived from a place name meaning "ash tree town" in Old English. This was a rare masculine name until the 1980s, when it gradually began becoming more common for both genders. Inspired by the female character Ashton Main from the 1985 miniseries North and South, parents in America gave it more frequently to girls than boys from 1986 to 1997. Since then it has been overwhelmingly masculine once again, perhaps due in part to the fame of the actor Ashton Kutcher (1978-).
Asier m Basque
Means "the beginning", from Basque hasi.
Aster f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Latin from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star".
Aston m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name Æðelstan.
Astrid f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French, English
Modern Scandinavian form of Ástríðr. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking. It was also borne by a Swedish princess (1905-1935) who became the queen of Belgium as the wife of Leopold III.
Atif m Arabic
Means "affection, kindness" in Arabic.
Aton m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jtn meaning "solar disk". Aton was an Egyptian god of the sun, depicted as a solar disk with long rays extending downwards. The worship of Aton was especially extensive during the reign of the pharaoh Akhenaton, who proclaimed Aton was the only god.
Atse m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element adal meaning "noble".
Atsuko f Japanese
From Japanese (atsu) meaning "warm", (atsu) meaning "deep, true, sincere" or (atsu) meaning "honest" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Atuf m Arabic
Means "loving" in Arabic.
Auberon m English (Rare)
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably Alberich.
Aubert m French
French variant of Albert.
Aubin m French
French form of Albinus.
Aubrey m & f English
Norman French form of the Germanic name Alberich. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
Audrey f English, French
Medieval diminutive of Æðelþryð. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
Austin m English
Medieval contracted form of Augustine 1. Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
Ave f Italian, Estonian
Possibly from the name of the prayer Ave Maria, in which Ave is Latin meaning "greetings, salutations". In Estonian it is also associated with the word ava meaning "open".
Avenir m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Abner.
Aveniru m Old Church Slavic
Old Church Slavic form of Abner.
Avery m & f English
From an English surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.... [more]
Avi m Hebrew
Means "my father" in Hebrew. It is also a diminutive of Avraham or Aviram.
Aviel m Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of Abiel.
Avis f English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
Avner m Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Abner.
Axmed m Eastern African, Somali
Somali form of Ahmad.
Aymeric m French
French form of Emmerich.
Ayşe f Turkish
Turkish form of Aisha.
Ayumi f Japanese
From Japanese (ayumi) meaning "walk, step". It can also be from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (yu) meaning "reason, cause" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Otherwise it can be written with different combinations of kanji, or with the hiragana writing system.
Ayün f Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "love" in Mapuche.
Azel m Biblical
Means "reserved" in Hebrew. This is both the name of a minor character and a place name in the Old Testament.
Azure f & m English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
Balder m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Baldr meaning "hero, lord, prince", derived from baldr meaning "brave, bold". In Norse mythology Balder was the handsome son of Odin and Frigg. Because of the disturbing dreams he had when he was young, his mother extracted an oath from every thing in the world that it would not harm him. However the devious god Loki learned that she had overlooked mistletoe. Being jealous, he tricked the blind god Hoder into throwing a branch of mistletoe at Balder, which killed him.
Baldo m Italian, Spanish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element bald "bold, brave", such as Baldwin and Theobald. In Italian it can also be short for the non-Germanic name Baldassare.
Baldwin m English, Ancient Germanic
Means "bold friend", derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and win "friend". In the Middle Ages this was a popular name in Flanders and among the Normans, who brought it to Britain. It was borne by one of the leaders of the First Crusade, an 11th-century nobleman from Flanders. After the crusaders conquered Jerusalem, he was crowned as the king of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Bandile m & f Southern African, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele
Means "they have increased" in Zulu, Xhosa and Ndebele.
Barney m English
Diminutive of Barnabas, Bernard or Barnaby.
Basil 1 m English
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
Basil 2 m Arabic
Means "brave, valiant" in Arabic.
Basit m Arabic
Means "one who enlarges" in Arabic.
Bear m English (Modern)
From the English word for the animal, derived from Old English bera, probably derived from a root meaning "brown".
Beatrix f German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
Beatriz f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Beatrix.
Becky f English
Diminutive of Rebecca.
Bedros m Armenian
Western Armenian transcription of Petros.
Belinha f Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Isabel.
Benita f Spanish
Feminine form of Benito.
Benito m Spanish, Italian
Spanish form of Benedict. This name was borne by Mexican president Benito Juárez, and also by Benito Mussolini (who was named after Juárez), the fascist dictator of Italy during World War II.
Benoît m French
French form of Benedict.
Bento m Portuguese
Portuguese short form of Benedito.
Berny m & f English
Variant of Bernie.
Berta f Polish, Czech, Hungarian, German, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene
Form of Bertha in several languages.
Bertha f German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
Bertilo m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous".
Bertina f English
Feminine form of Bert.
Beryl f English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
Beth f English
Short form of Elizabeth, or sometimes Bethany.
Bethan f Welsh
Welsh diminutive of Elizabeth.
Bethany f English
From the name of a biblical town, Βηθανία (Bethania) in Greek, which is probably of Aramaic or Hebrew origin, possibly meaning "house of affliction" or "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany is the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.
Beti f Macedonian
Macedonian diminutive of Elisaveta.
Betsy f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Beulah f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
Bhima m Hinduism
Means "terrible, formidable" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata this is the name of the second son of Pandu, and thus one of the five Pandavas. He was known for his terrific strength and skill as a warrior.
Bhumi f Hinduism
Means "earth, soil" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu earth goddess. She is the wife of Varaha, an avatar of Vishnu.
Bijou f Various
Means "jewel" in French.
Birta f Icelandic
Icelandic diminutive of Birgitta.
Birthe f Danish
Danish diminutive of Birgitta.
Björk f Icelandic
Means "birch tree" in Icelandic.
Björn m Swedish, Icelandic, German
From an Old Norse byname derived from bjǫrn meaning "bear".
Bjørn m Norwegian, Danish
Danish and Norwegian form of Björn.
Blaine m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Irish given name Bláán.