Names Categorized "JESC names"

This is a list of names in which the categories include JESC names.
gender
usage
Alicja f Polish
Polish form of Alice.
Anna f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see Hannah) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
Arina f Russian
Russian variant of Irina.
Chanel f English
From a French surname that meant either "channel", indicating a person who lived near a channel of water, or "jug, jar, bottle", indicating a manufacturer of jugs. It has been used as an American given name since 1970s, influenced by the Chanel brand name (a line of women's clothing and perfume), which was named for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
Darija f Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of Daria.
Darina 2 f Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic word dar meaning "gift". It can also be used as a diminutive of Daria.
Demi f Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Δήμη or Ντίμι or Ντίμη (see Dimi).
Eliana 1 f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English (Modern)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Éliane.
Erin f English, Irish
Anglicized form of Eireann. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
Fidan f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "sapling" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
Giorgi m Georgian
Georgian form of George. This was the name of several kings of Georgia.
Joana f Portuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of Iohanna (see Joanna).
Jordan m & f English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name Jordanes, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
Levon m Armenian
Armenian form of Leon. This was the name of several kings of Cilician Armenia, including the first king Levon I the Magnificent.
Lizaveta f Russian
Short form of Yelizaveta.
Mariam f Biblical Greek, Georgian, Armenian, Malay, Arabic
Form of Maria used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as the Georgian, Armenian and Malay form. It is also an alternate transcription of Arabic مريم (see Maryam).
Marija f Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian
Form of Maria in several languages.
Mathieu m French
French variant form of Matthew.
Maud f English, French, Dutch
Usual medieval form of Matilda. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's 1855 poem Maud.
Maxim m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech
Alternate transcription of Russian Максим or Belarusian Максім (see Maksim) or Ukrainian Максим (see Maksym). This is also the Czech form.
Mila f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
Nadezhda f Russian, Bulgarian
Means "hope" in Russian and Bulgarian.
Naomi 1 f English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omi) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).... [more]
Oleksandr m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of Alexander.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
Petar m Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Peter.
Polina f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Greek
Either a Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Greek form of Paulina or a short form of Apollinariya.
Rita f Italian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese, Latvian, Lithuanian
Short form of Margherita and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
Roksana f Russian, Polish
Russian and Polish form of Roxana.
Sandra f Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Romanian
Short form of Alessandra. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel Emilia in England (1864) and the reissued version Sandra Belloni (1887). A famous bearer is the American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
Sofiya f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Sophia.
Sophia f English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
Susan f English
English variant of Susanna. This has been most common spelling since the 18th century. It was especially popular both in the United States and the United Kingdom from the 1940s to the 1960s. A notable bearer was the American feminist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906).
Tamar f Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "date palm" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.
Tatyana f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Tatiana.
Valentina f Italian, Russian, Lithuanian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
Volha f Belarusian
Belarusian form of Olga.
Wiktoria f Polish
Polish form of Victoria.