Names Categorized "Strike Witches characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include Strike Witches characters.
gender
usage
Albert m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert meaning "noble and bright", composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
Amelie f German
German variant of Amelia.
Ángela f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Angelus (see Angel).
Anna f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see Hannah) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
Aurora f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
Bernhard m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of Bernard.
Charlotte f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of Charles. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.... [more]
Christiane f German, French
German and French feminine form of Christian.
Dietlinde f German
From the Germanic name Theudelinda, derived from the elements theud "people" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Theudelinda was a 6th-century queen of the Lombards.
Edith f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
Edytha f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Edythe.
Elizabeth f English, Biblical
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
Elma f Dutch, English, German (Rare)
Short form of Wilhelmine or names ending in elma, such as Anselma. It has also been recorded as a combination of Elizabeth and Mary, as in the case of the 19th-century daughter of the Earl of Elgin, who was named using her mother's first and middle names.
Erhard m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element era "honour, respect" or hari "army" combined with hard "brave, hardy". In some cases it may be a variant of Eberhard.
Erica f English, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of Eric. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
Erwin m German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name Eburwin. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
Francesca f Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see Francis).
Georgette f French
French feminine form of George.
Giuseppina f Italian
Feminine form of Giuseppe.
Gundula f German
Elaborated form of Gunda.
Hanna 1 f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Form of Channah (see Hannah) in several languages.
Haruka f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
Hayate m Japanese
From Japanese (hayate) meaning "sudden, sound of the wind". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
Heidemarie f German
Combination of Heide and Marie.
Heinrike f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Heinrich.
Helma f German, Dutch
Short form of Wilhelmina.
Hikari f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
Ichirō m Japanese
From Japanese (ichi) meaning "one" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the first son. Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
Ichirou m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 一郎 (see Ichirō).
Ilmatar f Finnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish ilma "air" combined with a feminine suffix. In Finnish mythology Ilmatar was a semi-androgynous goddess of the heavens. She was the mother of Ilmarinen, Väinämöinen and Lemminkäinen.
Jean-Paul m French
Combination of Jean 1 and Paul. A famous bearer was the French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980).
Jennifer f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see Guinevere). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma (1906). It barely ranked in the United until the late 1930s, when it began steadily growing in popularity, accelerating into the early 1970s. It was the most popular name for girls in America between 1970 and 1984, though it was not as common in the United Kingdom.... [more]
Julius m Ancient Roman, English, German, Finnish, Lithuanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Greek ἴουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god Jupiter. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
Junko f Japanese
From Japanese (jun) meaning "obedience" or (jun) meaning "pure" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
Justina f English, Spanish, Slovene, Lithuanian, Late Roman
From Latin Iustina, the feminine form of Iustinus (see Justin). This name was borne by several early saints and martyrs.
Katharine f English, German
English variant of Katherine and German variant of Katharina. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
Klaus m German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
German short form of Nicholas.
Kurt m German, English
German contracted form of Conrad. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
Lynette f English
Form of Luned used by Alfred Lord Tennyson in his 1872 poem Gareth and Lynette. In modern times it is also regarded as a diminutive of Lynn.
Maria f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see Mary). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
Marian 1 f English
Variant of Marion 1. This name was borne in English legend by Maid Marian, Robin Hood's love. It is sometimes considered a combination of Mary and Ann.
Martina f German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see Martin). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
Michiko f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can also be comprised of other combinations of kanji.
Minna f German (Archaic), Finnish, Swedish
Means "love" in Old German, specifically medieval courtly love. It is also used as a short form of Wilhelmina. This is the name of the title character in the play Minna von Barnhelm (1767) by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing.
Mio f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with (o) meaning "cherry blossom" or (o) meaning "thread". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
Perrine f French
French feminine form of Perrin, a diminutive of Pierre.
Raisa 2 f Yiddish
From Yiddish רויז (roiz) meaning "rose".
Rosalie f French, German, Dutch, English
French, German and Dutch form of Rosalia. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie Rosalie (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
Rose f English, French
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Sanya 2 m & f Russian
Diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Sasha m & f Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Sayaka f Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "sand" or (sa) meaning "thread, silk" with (ya) meaning "also" or (ya), an interjection, combined with (ka) meaning "fragrance" or (ka) meaning "increase". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Shirley f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of a main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel Shirley (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
Shizuka f Japanese
From Japanese (shizu) meaning "quiet" combined with (ka) meaning "summer" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Tomoko f Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other kanji characters as well.
Trevor m Welsh, English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "big village" from Welsh tref "village" and mawr "large".
Ursula f English, Swedish, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
Wilma f German, Dutch, English
Short form of Wilhelmina. German settlers introduced it to America in the 19th century.
Winston m English
From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name Wynnstan. A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (1874-1965), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's 1949 novel 1984.
Yoshiko f Japanese
From Japanese (yoshi) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable", (yoshi) meaning "fragrant, virtuous, beautiful" or (yoshi) meaning "joy, pleased" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed from other kanji combinations as well.