Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is English.
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FULKE   m   English (Archaic)
Variant of FULK.
FULTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of the town of Foulden in Norfolk, itself meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
GABBY   m & f   English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GABE   m   English
Short form of GABRIEL.
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GAGE   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GALE (2)   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
GALEN   m   English
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene). It was borne by a 2nd-century BC Greco-Roman physician who contributed to anatomy and medicine. In modern times the name is occasionally given in his honour.
GALLAGHER   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of GALLCHOBHAR".
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GAREY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARFIELD   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881). It is now associated with the cat in Jim Davis's cartoon strip 'Garfield'.
GARLAND   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an English surname which either referred to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or was derived from the Norman name GUARIN.
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GARRET   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
GARRETT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GARRICK   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GARRY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARTH   m   English
From a surname meaning "garden" in Old Norse, originally denoting one who lived near or worked in a garden.
GARY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
GAVIN   m   English, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GAYELORD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GAYLORD.
GAYLE   f & m   English
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GAYLORD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old French gaillard "high-spirited, boistrous". This name was rarely used after the mid-20th century, when the word gay acquired the slang meaning "homosexual".
GAZ   m   English (British)
Diminutive of GARY or GARETH.
GEFFREY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GEOFFREY.
GENE   m   English
Short form of EUGENE.
GEOFF   m   English
Short form of GEOFFREY.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.... [more]
GEORDIE   m   English
Diminutive of GEORGE.
GEORGE   m   English, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
GEORGIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of GEORGIA or GEORGE.
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERMAN (1)   m   English
English form of GERMANUS.
GERRARD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GERARD.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERVASE   m   English (Rare)
English form of GERVASIUS. The Normans introduced this name to England in the Middle Ages, though it has since become rare.
GIB   m   English
Medieval diminutive of GILBERT.
GIDEON   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GIFFARD   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GIL (2)   m   English
Short form of GILBERT and other names beginning with Gil.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILES   m   English
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLANVILLE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman place name which possibly meant "domain of (a person named) Gland" in Old French.
GLEN   m   Scottish, English
Variant of GLENN.
GLENN   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname is American astronaut John Glenn (1921-).
GODDARD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GODFREY   m   English
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace". The Normans brought this name to England, where it became common during the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was Godfrey of Bouillon, an 11th-century leader of the First Crusade and the first ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORD   m   English
Short form of GORDON.
GORDEN   m   English
Variant of GORDON.
GORDIE   m   English
Diminutive of GORDON. A famous bearer was Canadian hockey star Gordie Howe (1928-2016).
GORDON   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GORDY   m   English
Diminutive of GORDON.
GORE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "triangular" (from Old English gara), originally referring to someone who lived on a triangular piece of land. A famous bearer is American writer Gore Vidal (1925-).
GOSSE   m   English (Rare), Medieval French
From an English and French surname which was originally derived from the Norman given name Gosse, a diminutive of the Germanic name GOZZO.
GRADY   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
GRAEME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRAHAM   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
GRAHAME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRANT   m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GRANVILLE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman place name GRAINVILLE.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GRAYSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GREG   m   English
Short form of GREGORY.
GREGG   m   English
Short form of GREGORY.
GREGORY   m   English
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.... [more]
GRENVILLE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRANVILLE.
GRESHAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "grazing homestead" in Old English.
GREY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of GRAY.
GREYSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of GRAYSON.
GRIER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GREER.
GRIFFIN   m   English
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GROSVENOR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "great hunter" in Norman French.
GROVER   m   English
From a surname meaning "grove of trees" from Old English graf. A famous bearer was the American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), who popularized the name in the United States at the end of the 19th century. The name is now associated with a muppet character from the children's television program 'Sesame Street'.
GUS (1)   m   English, Scottish
Short form of AUGUSTUS or ANGUS.
GUY   m   English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
GYLES   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GILES.
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HADYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HAYDEN.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HALE (2)   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HALL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English heall "manor, hall", originally belonging to a person who lived or worked in a manor.
HALLAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning either "at the rocks" or "at the nook" in Old English.
HAMILTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". The surname was originally taken from the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists). A famous bearer of the surname was Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), a founding father of the United States who was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr.
HAMMOND   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from either the Germanic given name Haimund which meant "home protection" or else from the Old Norse given name Hámundr which meant "high protection".
HAMNET   m   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of HAMO. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play 'Hamlet'.
HANK   m   English
Originally a short form of Hankin which was a medieval diminutive of JOHN. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of HENRY, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive HENK. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-).
HAPPY   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARDING   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name HEARD. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Middle English hardi "brave, hardy".
HARLAN   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLAND   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of HARLAN.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARMON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HERMAN.
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). The actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as 'Star Wars' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer.
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HARTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HARVE   m   English
Short form of HARVEY.
HARVEY   m   English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HARVIE   m   English
Variant of HARVEY.
HAVEN   f & m   English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYDN   m   English (British)
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEADLEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HEDLEY.
HEATH   m   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HEDLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HENDERSON   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "son of HENRY".
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HERB   m   English
Short form of HERBERT.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERBIE   m   English
Diminutive of HERBERT.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HERVEY   m   English
Variant of HARVEY.
HEWIE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUGHIE.
HILARY   f & m   English
Medieval English form of HILARIUS or HILARIA. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name. It was revived in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century as a predominantly feminine name. In America, this name and the variant Hillary seemed to drop in popularity after Hillary Clinton (1947-) became the first lady.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HIRAM   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Probably of Phoenician origin, though it could be from Hebrew meaning "exalted brother". This was the name of a king of Tyre in the Old Testament. As an English given name, Hiram came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where it gained some currency.
HOLDEN   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.
HOLLIS   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
HOMER   m   English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the 'Iliad', about the Trojan War, and the 'Odyssey', about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
HORACE   m   English, French
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
HORATIO   m   English
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
HOWARD   m   English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HOWIE   m   English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HOYT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English hoit "stick", originally a nickname for a thin person.
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUDSON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
HUEY   m   English
Variant of HUGHIE.
HUGH   m   English
From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.
HUGHIE   m   English
Diminutive of HUGH.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HUMPHREY   m   English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.
HUMPHRY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUMPHREY.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
HYRAM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM.
HYRUM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM. This name was borne by Hyrum Smith (1800-1844), an early leader within the Mormon church.
IAN   m   Scottish, English
Scottish form of JOHN.
IGGY   m   English
Diminutive of IGNATIUS.
IKE   m   English
Diminutive of ISAAC. This was the nickname of the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), based on the initial sound of his surname.
ILBERT   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name HILDEBERT.
INDIANA   f & m   English
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
INDIGO   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".
INGRAM   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Norman French given name ENGUERRAND.
INIGO   m   English (Rare)
English form of ÍÑIGO. It became well-known in Britain due to the 17th-century English architect Inigo Jones. He was named after his father, a Catholic who was named for Saint Ignatius of Loyola.
IRA (1)   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRVINE   m   English, Scottish
Variant of IRVING.
IRVING   m   English, Scottish, Jewish
From a Scottish surname which was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah. A famous bearer was the Russian-American songwriter and lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), whose birth name was Israel Beilin.
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
ISAAC   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.... [more]
ISADOR   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ISIDORE.
ISADORE   m   English
Variant of ISIDORE.
ISAIAH   m   English, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Yesha'yahu) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". Isaiah is one of the four major prophets of the Old Testament, supposedly the author of the Book of Isaiah. He was from Jerusalem and probably lived in the 8th century BC, at a time when Assyria threatened the Kingdom of Judah. As an English Christian name, Isaiah was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
ISIAH   m   English
Variant of ISAIAH.
ISIDORE   m   English, French, Georgian, Jewish
From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.... [more]
ISRAEL   m   Jewish, English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contended". In the Old Testament Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
ISSAC   m   English
Variant of ISAAC.
ISSY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABELLA and other names beginning with Is.
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IVOR   m   Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
IZZY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABEL, ISRAEL, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
JACE   m   English
Short form of JASON.
JACK   m   English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
JACKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACKSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.
JADYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of JAY (1).
JAIDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAKE   m   English
Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.
JAMES   m   English, Biblical
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.... [more]
JAMESON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JAMEY   m   English
Diminutive of JAMES.
JAMIE   m & f   Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAMISON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JARED   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series 'The Big Valley'.
JAROD   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARON (2)   m   English (Modern)
Invented name, probably based on JARED and DARREN.
JARRED   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARRETT   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
JARROD   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARVIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name GERVAIS.
JASON   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.... [more]
JASPER   m   English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAXON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAXSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAY (1)   m   English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JAYCE   m   English
Short form of JASON.
JAYCOB   m   English (Rare)
Variant of JACOB.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYDON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYLEN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYLIN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYMES   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JAMES.
JAYSON   m   English
Variant of JASON.
JEB   m   English
Sometimes a diminutive of JACOB. This name may have also resulted from a nickname of James Ewell Brown Stuart (1833-1864), a Confederate general in the American Civil War, which was formed from the initial letters of his three given names.
JED   m   English
Short form of JEDIDIAH.
JEFF   m   English
Short form of JEFFREY.
JEFFERSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JEFFREY". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
JEFFERY   m   English
Variant of JEFFREY.
JEFFREY   m   English
Medieval variant of GEOFFREY. In America, Jeffrey has been more common than Geoffrey, though this is not true in Britain.
JEFFRY   m   English
Variant of JEFFREY.
JEM   m   English
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JEMMY   m   English
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JEP   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval diminutive of GEOFFREY.
JEPSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of JEP".
JEPTHA   m   English (Archaic)
Variant of JEPHTHAH.
JERALD   m   English
Variant of GERALD.
JERE   m   Finnish, English
Diminutive of JEREMIAH.
JEREMIAH   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) which meant "YAHWEH has uplifted". This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.... [more]
JEREMY   m   English, Biblical
Medieval English form of JEREMIAH, and the form used in some English versions of the New Testament.
JERMAINE   m   English
Variant of GERMAIN. The name was popularized in the 1970s by Jermaine Jackson (1954-), a member of the singing group The Jackson 5.
JEROLD   m   English
Variant of GERALD.
JEROME   m   English
From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ‘ιερος (hieros) "sacred" and ονομα (onoma) "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.
JERRARD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GERARD.
JERRED   m   English (Rare)
Variant of JARED.
JERROD   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JERROLD   m   English
Variant of GERALD.
JERRY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JEREMY, JEROME, GERALD, GERALDINE, and other names beginning with the same sound.
JERVIS   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of JARVIS.
JESS   m & f   English
Short form of JESSE or JESSICA.
JESSE   m   English, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JESSIE (2)   m   English
Variant of JESSE.
JETT   m   English (Modern)
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
JEWEL   f & m   English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JEWELL   f & m   English
Variant of JEWEL.
JEZ   m   English (British)
Diminutive of JEREMY.
JEZZA   m   English (British)
Diminutive of JEREMY.
JIM   m   English
Medieval diminutive of JAMES.
JIMI   m   English
Diminutive of JAMES. A famous bearer was the rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
JIMMIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of JAMES.
JIMMY   m   English
Diminutive of JAMES.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOBY   m   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JOB.
JOCELYN   f & m   English, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JODY   f & m   English
Probably either a variant of JUDY or a diminutive of JOSEPH. It was popularized by the young hero in Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' novel 'The Yearling' (1938) and the subsequent film adaptation (1946).
JOE   m   English
Short form of JOSEPH. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).
JOEL   m   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOEY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JOHN   m   English, Biblical
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.... [more]
JOHNATHAN   m   English
Variant of JONATHAN.
JOHNATHON   m   English
Variant of JONATHAN.
JOHNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOHNNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOHNNY   m   English
Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).
JOJO   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOSEPH, JOLENE, and other names that begin with Jo.
JOLYON   m   English (Rare)
Medieval form of JULIAN. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his 'Forsyte Saga' novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
JON (2)   m   English
Short form of JONATHAN, or sometimes a variant of JOHN.
JONAH   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JONATHON   m   English
Variant of JONATHAN.
JONNY   m   English
Diminutive of JONATHAN.
JONTY   m   English (British)
Diminutive of JONATHAN.
JOOLS   m & f   English
Diminutive of JULIAN or JULIA.
JORDAN   m & f   English, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDON   m   English
Variant of JORDAN.
JOSEPH   m   English, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JOSH   m   English
Short form of JOSHUA.
JOSHUA   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.... [more]
JOSIAH   m   Biblical, English
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
JOSS   f & m   English
Short form of JOCELYN.
JOYCE   f & m   English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
JUDD   m   English, Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of JORDAN. Modern use of this name is inspired by the surname that was derived from the medieval name.
JUDE (1)   m   English, Biblical
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JULES (2)   f & m   English
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.
JULIAN   m   English, Polish, German
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, German
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
JULYAN   m   English (Rare)
Medieval variant of JULIAN.
JUNIOR   m   English
From a nickname which was originally used for a boy who had the same name as his father.
JUSTICE   m & f   English
From an occupational surname which meant "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
JUSTIN   m   English, French, Slovene
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).
JUSTY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JUSTIN or JUSTINE.
KADE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADE.
KADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAEDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KALEB   m   English (Modern)
English variant of CALEB.
KAM   m   English (Modern)
Short form of KAMERON.
KAMERON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CAMERON.
KAOLIN   m   English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN. This is also the name of a type of clay.
KARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KASEY   m & f   English
Variant of CASEY.
KAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KEATON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "shed town" in Old English.
KEEFE   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEEGAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
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