Names Categorized "y vowels"

This is a list of names in which the categories include y vowels.
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ABBEY   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABBY   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABIGAYLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ABIGAIL.
ADALYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADALYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADDY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.
ADDYSON   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ADDISON.
ADELYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALBAN   m   German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALISYA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALLY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALLYCIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALLYN   m & f   English
Variant or feminine form of ALAN.
ALLYSON   f   English
Variant of ALISON.
ALOYSIUS   m   English
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
ALYCE   f   English
Variant of ALICE.
ALYCIA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYS   f   English
Variant of ALICE.
ALYSA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICE.
ALYSHA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSIA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSON   f   English
Variant of ALISON.
ALYSSA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
ALYSSIA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYX   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ALEX.
AMBERLY   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of AMBER, influenced by the spelling of the name KIMBERLY.
AMERY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EMERY.
AMY   f   English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
AMYAS   m   English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname which originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
ANDY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
ANSLEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AINSLEY.
ANTHONY   m   English
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).... [more]
ANTONY   m   English
Variant of ANTHONY. This was formerly the usual English spelling of the name, but during the 17th century the h began to be added.
ARYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ARIANA.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLYN   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AUDREY   f   English
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AUSTYN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AUSTIN.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BARNABY   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.
BARNEY   m   English
Diminutive of BARNABAS, BERNARD or BARNABY.
BARRY   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BECKY   f   English
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BENJY   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.
BENNY   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BERNY   m & f   English
Variant of BERNIE.
BERRY (1)   m   English
Variant of BARRY.
BERRY (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BERYL   f   English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BETHANY   f   English, Biblical
From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.
BETHNEY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BETHANY.
BETONY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BETSY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTYE   f   English
Variant of BETTY.
BEVERLEY   f   English
Variant of BEVERLY.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BIDDY   f   Irish, English
Diminutive of BRIDGET.
BILLY   m   English
Diminutive of BILL. A notable bearer was the American outlaw Billy the Kid (1859-1881), whose real name was William H. Bonney.
BINDY   f   English
Diminutive of BELINDA.
BLYTHE   f & m   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.
BOBBY   m   English
Diminutive of BOB. Hockey greats Bobby Hull (1939-) and Bobby Orr (1948-) have borne this name.
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BRAELYN   f   English (Modern)
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.
BRAIDY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRADY.
BRANDY   f   English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
BRIONY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRYONY.
BRITNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITTANY   f   English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.
BRITTNY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRODY   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BRYAN   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRYANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYCE   m   English
Variant of BRICE.
BRYN   m & f   Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYNNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYON   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYONY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BUDDY   m   English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BUFFY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH, from a child's pronunciation of the final syllable. It is now associated with the main character from the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
BUNNY   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURGUNDY   f   English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BYRNE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BYSSHE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
CANDY   f   English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CANDYCE   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARLEY   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLY   f   English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLYLE   m   English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARLYN   f   English
Contracted variant of CAROLINE.
CAROLYN   f   English
Variant of CAROLINE.
CARRY   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CARYL   f   English
Variant of CAROL (1).
CARYN   f   English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CATHRYN   f   English
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHY   f   English
Diminutive of CATHERINE.
CAYLEY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEE.
CECILY   f   English
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CHARITY   f   English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHARLEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES.
CHASITY   f   English
Variant of CHASTITY.
CHASTITY   f   English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the daughter of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
CHAUNCEY   m   English
From a Norman surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in American in honour of Harvard president Charles Chauncey (1592-1672).
CHELSEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHELSEA.
CHERILYN   f   English
Combination of CHERYL and the popular name suffix lyn.
CHERRY   f   English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CHERRYL   f   English
Variant of CHERYL.
CHERYL   f   English
Elaboration of CHERIE, perhaps influenced by BERYL. This name was not used before the 20th century.
CHESLEY   m   English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
CHRISSY   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRYSANTA   f   English (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CHRYSTAL   f   English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
CHYNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHINA.
CICELY   f   English
Medieval variant of CECILY.
CINDY   f   English
Diminutive of CYNTHIA.
CISSY   f   English
Variant of SISSY.
CLANCY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh which means "son of Flannchadh". The Gaelic name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
CLARITY   f   English (Rare)
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".
CLAY   m   English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLEMENCY   f   English (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CLYDE   m   English
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, which is of unknown origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858.
COBY   m & f   English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of JACOB.
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COLBY   m   English
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
COLLYN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of COLLEEN.
CORTNEY   f & m   English
Variant of COURTNEY.
CORY   m   English
Variant of COREY.
CORYNN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CORINNE.
COTY   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
CRYSTAL   f   English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
CY   m   English
Short form of CYRUS or CYRIL.
CYAN   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
CYBELE   f   Near Eastern Mythology (Hellenized)
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
CYBILL   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SIBYL. This name was borne by actress Cybill Shepherd (1950-), who was named after her grandfather Cy and her father Bill.
CYDNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of SYDNEY.
CYMONE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SIMONE (1).
CYNDI   f   English
Short form of CYNTHIA.
CYNTHIA   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
CYPRIAN   m   Polish, English (Rare)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus which meant "from Cyprus" in Latin. Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
CYRIL   m   English, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
CYRILLA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of CYRIL.
CYRILLE   m & f   French
French form of CYRIL, sometimes used as a feminine form.
CYRUS   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κυρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DAISY   f   English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DALEY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DALY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DALEY.
DANNY   m   English
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARCEY   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DARCY.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DARRYL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DARYL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DAVY   m   English
Diminutive of DAVID.
DAYNA   f   English
Feminine variant of DANA (2).
DAYTON   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name which possibly meant either "dairy town" or "ditch town" in Old English.
DEBBY   f   English
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DELROY   m   English (Rare)
Possibly an alteration of LEROY.
DENNY   m   English
Diminutive of DENNIS.
DERBY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DARBY.
DERRYL   m   English (Rare)
Variant of DARRELL.
DERYCK   m   English (Rare)
Variant of DEREK.
DESTINY   f   English
Means simply "destiny, fate" from the English word, ultimately from Latin destinare "to determine", a derivative of stare "to stand". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the last half of the 20th century.
DEVYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of DEVIN.
DIGBY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of an English town, itself derived from a combination of Old English dic "dyke, ditch" and Old Norse byr "farm, town".
DIGGORY   m   English (Rare)
Probably an Anglicized form of Degaré. Sir Degaré was the subject of a medieval poem set in Brittany. The name may mean "lost one" from French égaré.
DOLLY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them. In modern times this name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of DOLORES.
DONNY   m   English
Diminutive of DONALD.
DOROTHY   f   English
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz' (1900).
DORTHY   f   English
Variant of DOROTHY.
DORY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY or DORIS. This is the name of a fish in the animated film 'Finding Nemo' (2003).
DOTTY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUSTY   m & f   English
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
DYAN   f   English
Variant of DIANE.
DYLAN   m   Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
DYSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of DYE".
EBONY   f   English
From the English word ebony for the black wood which comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
EDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWIN.
EDWYNA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDYTHA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of EDYTHE.
EDYTHE   f   English
Variant of EDITH.
ELLERY   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ELLY   f   English, Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH or an English variant of ELLIE.
ELWYN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELY   m   English
Variant of ELI (1).
ELYSE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. It was popularized in the early 1980s by a character from the television comedy 'Family Ties'.
EMELY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of EMILY.
EMERY   m & f   English
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
EMILY   f   English
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.... [more]
EMMALYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of EMMELINE, or else a combination of EMMA and the fashionable name suffix lyn.
EMMY   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
EMORY   m   English
Variant of EMERY.
EPIPHANY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) which commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
ERYKAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERICA.
ERYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERIN.
ETHELYN   f   English
Diminutive of ETHEL.
EVALYN   f   English
Variant of EVELYN.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
FANCY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word fancy which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαινω (phaino) "to show, to appear".
FANNY   f   English, French, Spanish
Diminutive of FRANCES, FRANÇOISE or STÉPHANIE. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FARLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "fern clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of this name is Canadian author Farley Mowat (1921-).
FAYE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FERDY   m   English
Diminutive of FERDINAND.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FLANNERY   f & m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
FLYNN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".
FRANKLYN   m   English
Variant of FRANKLIN.
FRANNY   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANCIS or FRANCES.
FREDDY   m   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK.
GABBY   m & f   English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GAREY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARRY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
GAY   f   English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
GAYELORD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GAYLORD.
GAYLA   f   English
Elaborated form of GAIL.
GAYLE   f & m   English
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GAYLORD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old French gaillard "high-spirited, boistrous". This name was rarely used after the mid-20th century, when the word gay acquired the slang meaning "homosexual".
GEFFREY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GEOFFREY.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.... [more]
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GINNY   f   English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLADYS   f   Welsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel 'Puck' (1870).
GLORY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
GODFREY   m   English
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace". The Normans brought this name to England, where it became common during the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was Godfrey of Bouillon, an 11th-century leader of the First Crusade and the first ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
GORDY   m   English
Diminutive of GORDON.
GRACELYN   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of GRACE using the popular name suffix lyn.
GRADY   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GRAYSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GREGORY   m   English
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.... [more]
GREY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of GRAY.
GREYSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of GRAYSON.
GUY   m   English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
GWENDOLYN   f   Welsh, English
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
GWYNETH   f   Welsh, English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of GWYNEDD or a form of Welsh gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It has been common in Wales since the 19th century.
GYLES   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GILES.
GYPSY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
GYTHA   f   English (Archaic)
From Gyða, an Old Norse diminutive of GUÐRÍÐR. It was borne by a Danish noblewoman who married the English lord Godwin of Wessex in the 11th century. The name was used in England for a short time after that, and was revived in the 19th century.
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HADYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HAYDEN.
HAILEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAPPY   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARDY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Middle English hardi "brave, hardy".
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARMONY   f   English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HARTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HARVEY   m   English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HATTY   f   English
Diminutive of HARRIET.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYDN   m   English (British)
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HAYLIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEADLEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HEDLEY.
HEDLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HERVEY   m   English
Variant of HARVEY.
HILARY   f & m   English
Medieval English form of HILARIUS or HILARIA. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name. It was revived in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century as a predominantly feminine name. In America, this name and the variant Hillary seemed to drop in popularity after Hillary Clinton (1947-) became the first lady.
HILLARY   f   English
Variant of HILARY. A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first man to climb Mount Everest.
HOLLY   f   English
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HONEY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
HOYT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English hoit "stick", originally a nickname for a thin person.
HUEY   m   English
Variant of HUGHIE.
HUMPHREY   m   English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.
HUMPHRY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUMPHREY.
HYACINTH (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone which also bears this name), ultimately from Greek ‘υακινθος (hyakinthos).
HYLDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HILDA.
HYRAM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM.
HYRUM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM. This name was borne by Hyrum Smith (1800-1844), an early leader within the Mormon church.
IDONY   f   English (Archaic)
Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA.
IGGY   m   English
Diminutive of IGNATIUS.
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