Names Categorized "lawyers"

This is a list of names in which the categories include lawyers.
gender
usage
Aaron m English, French, German, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon), which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.... [more]
Adella f English
Variant of Adela.
Aldus m & f Medieval English
Medieval variant of Aldous.
Allyson f English
Variant of Alison.
Alphonsine f French
French feminine diminutive of Alfonso.
Amabel f English (Rare)
Medieval feminine form of Amabilis.
Amaziah m Biblical
Means "Yahweh strengthens" in Hebrew. This is the name of several Old Testament characters, including a king of Judah.
Ambrosio m Spanish
Spanish form of Ambrosius (see Ambrose).
Annunziata f Italian
Means "announced" in Italian, referring to the event in the New Testament in which the angel Gabriel tells the Virgin Mary of the imminent birth of Jesus.
Balbina f Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Polish (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Balbinus. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
Bertha f German, English, Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the Old Frankish or Old Saxon element berht, Old High German beraht meaning "bright" (Proto-Germanic *berhtaz). This was the name of a few early saints, including a 6th-century Frankish princess who married and eventually converted King Æþelbeorht of Kent. It was also borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century (also called Bertrada), and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Beverley f English
Variant of Beverly.
Birdie f English
Diminutive of Bertha, Bernice and other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
Briseida f Literature
Form of Briseis used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
Conceição f Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of Concepción.
Corrine f English
Variant of Corinne.
Corry f Dutch
Diminutive of Cornelia and other names starting with Cor.
Darleen f English
Variant of Darlene.
Debora f Italian, Dutch, German (Rare)
Italian, Dutch and German form of Deborah.
Delia 1 f English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.
Demetrio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Demetrius.
Diosdado m Spanish
Spanish form of Deusdedit.
Doris f English, German, Swedish, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the Greek name Δωρίς (Doris), which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-2019).
Eldred m English
From an English surname that was derived from Ealdræd.
Elizabeth f English, Biblical
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
Ember f English (Modern)
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
Eunice f Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐνίκη (Eunike) meaning "good victory", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". The New Testament mentions her as the mother of Timothy. As an English name, it was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
Fabiano m Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of Fabianus (see Fabian).
Fatimata f Western African
Form of Fatimah used in western Africa.
Felipe m Spanish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese form of Philip.
Fernand m French
French form of Ferdinand.
Fernande f French
French feminine form of Ferdinand.
Finola f Irish
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Flavian m History (Ecclesiastical)
From the Roman family name Flavianus, which was derived from Flavius. This was the name of several early saints including a 5th-century patriarch of Constantinople who was beaten to death.
Florentino m Spanish
Spanish form of Florentinus.
France 1 f French
From the name of the country, sometimes considered a feminine form of Frank or short form of Françoise, both of which are ultimately related to the name of the country.
Francis m & f English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used (Proto-Germanic *frankô). This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
Genevra f Various
Variant of Ginevra.
Glenys f Welsh
Probably an elaboration of the Welsh word glân "pure, clean, holy" or glyn "valley". This name was created in the late 19th century.
Goodwin m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Godwine.
Gustavo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Gustav.
Harry m English
Medieval English form of Henry. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and names beginning with Har. Famous bearers include the American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972), who was named after his uncle Harrison, and the British royal Prince Harry (1984-), who is actually named Henry. It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
Heleen f Dutch
Dutch variant of Helen.
Hernando m Spanish
Medieval Spanish form of Ferdinand. A famous bearer of this name was Hernando Cortés (1485-1547), a Spanish conquistador.
Hilario m Spanish
Spanish form of Hilarius.
Ignacia f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Ignatius.
Ivy f English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
Jami 1 f English
Variant of Jamie.
Jeremiah m English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "Yahweh will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.... [more]
Jerrold m English
Variant of Gerald.
Joel m English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "Yahweh is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
Joyce f & m English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also became a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
Keisha f African American
Possibly invented, or possibly based on Keziah. It began to be used in the 1960s.
Kelda f English (Rare)
Possibly derived from Old Norse kildr meaning "a spring".
Khaing f & m Burmese
Means "firm, strong" in Burmese, possibly of Shan origin.
Lavinia f Roman Mythology, Romanian, Italian
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
Lila 2 f English
Variant of Leila.
Lincoln m English
From an English surname that was originally from the name of an English city, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
Lorie f English
Variant of Lori.
Lovemore m Southern African
From the English words love and more. This name is most common in Zimbabwe and elsewhere in southern Africa.
María Cristina f Spanish
Combination of María and Cristina.
María José f Spanish
Combination of María and José, the names of the parents of Jesus.
Marianela f Spanish
Combination of María and Estela.
Mavis f English
From the name of the type of bird, also called the song thrush, derived from Old French mauvis, of uncertain origin. It was first used as a given name by the British author Marie Corelli, who used it for a character in her novel The Sorrows of Satan (1895).
Meriem f Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic مريم (see Maryam) chiefly used in Northern Africa.
Merilyn f English
Variant of Marilyn.
Minerva f Roman Mythology, English, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
Moema f Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Means "lies" in Tupí. This name appears in the poem Caramuru (1781) by the Brazilian poet Santa Rita Durão.
Myra f English
Created by the 17th-century poet Fulke Greville. He possibly based it on Latin myrra meaning "myrrh" (a fragrant resin obtained from a tree). Otherwise, he may have simply rearranged the letters from the name Mary. Although unrelated etymologically, this is also the name of an ancient city of Anatolia.
Natividad f Spanish
Means "nativity" in Spanish.
Nunzia f Italian
Short form of Annunziata.
Obdulia f Spanish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a saint from Toledo, Spain. The details of her life are unknown.
Ofelia f Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Ophelia.
Pascual m Spanish
Spanish form of Pascal.
Patsy f & m English, Irish
Variant of Patty, also used as a diminutive of Patrick.
Rhoda f Biblical, English
Derived from Greek ῥόδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
Roland m English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Slovak, Albanian, Georgian, Medieval French
From the Old German elements hruod meaning "fame" and lant meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave".... [more]
Rosaline f English
Medieval variant of Rosalind. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost (1594) and Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Rosendo m Spanish
Spanish form of the Visigothic name *Hroþisinþs, composed of the Gothic elements hroþs "fame" and sinþs "time". This was the name of a 10th-century Galician saint, also known as Rudesind.
Roxane f French, English
French and English form of Roxana. This is the name of Cyrano's love interest in the play Cyrano de Bergerac (1897).
Sadie f English
Diminutive of Sarah.
Saule 2 f Kazakh
Means "ray, sunbeam" in Kazakh.
Selena f Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Selene. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena. Another famous bearer is the American actress and singer Selena Gomez (1992-).
Silvino m Portuguese, Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Portuguese, Spanish and Italian form of Silvinus.
Síofra f Irish
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Sophonisba f Phoenician (Latinized), History
From the Punic name 𐤑𐤐𐤍𐤁𐤏𐤋 (Ṣapanbaʿl) probably meaning "Ba'al conceals", derived from Phoenician 𐤑𐤐𐤍 (ṣapan) possibly meaning "to hide, to conceal" combined with the name of the god Ba'al. Sophonisba was a 3rd-century BC Carthaginian princess who killed herself rather than surrender to the Romans. Her name was recorded in this form by Roman historians such as Livy. She later became a popular subject of plays from the 16th century onwards.
Terri f English
Either a feminine variant of Terry 1 or a diminutive of Theresa.
Tiare f Tahitian
Means "flower" in Tahitian, also specifically referring to the species Gardenia taitensis.
Tiziana f Italian
Feminine form of Tiziano.
Tracy f & m English
From an English surname that was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to Thracius". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel The Pickwick Papers (1837). It was later popularized as a feminine name by the main character Tracy Lord in the movie The Philadelphia Story (1940). This name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of Theresa.
Ulric m English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric. When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of Ulrich.
Unity f English (Rare)
From the English word unity, which is ultimately derived from Latin unitas.
Valarie f English
Variant of Valerie.
Waleed m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic وليد (see Walid).
Wenceslao m Spanish
Spanish form of Václav, via the Latinized form Wenceslaus.
Wilburn m English
From an English surname that was probably originally derived from an unknown place name. The second element corresponds with Old English burne "stream".