Names Categorized "unisex"

This is a list of names in which the categories include unisex.
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ALLISON f English
Variant of ALISON.
ANGEL m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ASHLEY f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASPEN f English (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
AUBREY m & f English
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song 'Aubrey' along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
AUGUSTA f German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AYODELE m & f Western African, Yoruba
Means "joy has come home" in Yoruba.
AZURE f English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BENNIE m English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BERLIN f Various
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BETHEL f English
From an Old Testament place name meaning "house of God" in Hebrew. This was a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob saw his vision of the stairway. It is occasionally used as a given name.
BILLIE m & f English
Diminutive of BILL. It is also used as a feminine form of WILLIAM.
BLAKELY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" and leah "woodland clearing".
BOBBIE f & m English
Variant of BOBBY. As a feminine name it can be a diminutive of ROBERTA or BARBARA.
BRINLEY f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was taken from the name of a town meaning "burned clearing" in Old English.
BROOKLYN f English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
CAMPBELL m English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CAMRYN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of CAMERON.
CARROL m Irish
Variant of CARROLL.
CARROLL m Irish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CHANDLER m & f English
From an occupational surname that meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CHRIS m & f English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CIEL f & m Various
Means "sky" in French. It is not used as a given name in France itself.
CLARE f English
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLAUDIE f French
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CODY m English
From the Irish surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COURTNEY f & m English
From an aristocratic English surname that was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
CREE m English (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
DALEY m Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DANNIE m English
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DELANEY f English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DIAMOND f English (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DONNIE m English
Diminutive of DONALD.
DORRIS f English
Variant of DORIS.
EIRIAN f & m Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
EKUNDAYO f & m Western African, Yoruba
Means "sorrow becomes joy" in Yoruba.
EMORY m English
Variant of EMERY.
ERNIE m English
Diminutive of ERNEST.
ESME f & m English (British)
Variant of ESMÉ.
ESMÉ m & f English (British)
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century. It is now more common as a feminine name.
FALLON f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.
GEMINI m Roman Mythology
Means "twins" in Latin. This is the name of the third sign of the zodiac. The two brightest stars in the constellation, Castor and Pollux, are named for the mythological twin sons of Leda.
GERMAINE f French
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GWYN m Welsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
HAYDEN m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAZE f English (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
INDY m Popular Culture
Diminutive of INDIANA. This is the nickname of the hero of the 'Indiana Jones' movies, starring Harrison Ford.
JAIMIE f English
Variant of JAMIE.
JAMIE m & f Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAYME f English
Variant of JAMIE.
JEN f English
Short form of JENNIFER.
JET f Dutch
Short form of HENRIËTTE or MARIËTTE.
JODIE f English
Feminine variant of JODY.
JORDAN m & f English, French, Macedonian
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDYN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
JOURNEY f English (Modern)
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
KAMRYN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of CAMERON.
KELLY m & f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KENZIE m & f English
Short form of MACKENZIE.
KESTREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KIMBERLY f English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KIRBY m English
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse.
KYRIE m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a Christian prayer, also called the Kyrie eleison meaning "Lord, have mercy". It is ultimately from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". In America it was popularized as a masculine name by basketball player Kyrie Irving (1992-), whose name is pronounced differently than the prayer.
LARK f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LASHAY m African American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1).
LAUREL f English
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LEE m & f English
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEIGH f & m English
From a surname that was a variant of LEE.
LEXIE f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LEXY f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LONNIE m English
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LORENZA f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORIN m English
Variant of LOREN.
LORIS m Italian
Diminutive of LORENZO.
LYRIC f English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
MARLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARLOWE f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
MEGA f & m Indonesian
Means "cloud" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit मेघ (megha).
MERLE f & m English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERRYN f Cornish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Cornish (male) saint.
MODESTE m & f French
French masculine and feminine form of MODESTUS.
MONROE m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
NOVA f English
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
ORAL m English
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
PARVEEN f & m Indian, Hindi
Hindi form of PARVIN, also used as a masculine name.
PEARL f English
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PHÚC m & f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (phúc) meaning "happiness, good fortune, blessing".
PLACIDE m & f French
French masculine and feminine form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
PRAISE f English (Rare)
From the English word praise, which is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Late Latin preciare, a derivative of Latin pretium "price, worth".
QUINN m & f Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
REGAN f English
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
RENE m & f English
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
ROHAN (2) f Literature
From the novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, where it is a place name meaning "horse country" in Sindarin.
ROWAN m & f Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RYLEE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SAM (1) m & f English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SCOUT f English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
SHANNON f & m English
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
SHAY (1) m Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA.
SHAY (2) m & f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew שַׁי (see SHAI).
SID m English
Short form of SIDNEY.
SKY f & m English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYE f English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SLOANE f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SORREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".
STAV f & m Hebrew
Means "autumn" in Hebrew.
SYD m English
Short form of SYDNEY.
TASHI m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "good fortune" in Tibetan.
TATUM f English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TAYLOR m & f English
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEDDY m English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
TEGAN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh teg "fair".
VÂN f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (vân) meaning "cloud".
VEASNA m & f Khmer
Means "opportunity, good fortune, fate" in Khmer.
XIU f Chinese
From Chinese (xiù) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
XUÂN m & f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (xuân) meaning "spring (the season)".