Ancient Names

These names were used in various ancient regions.
gender
usage
Shammuramat f Ancient Assyrian
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Western Semitic language and meaning "high heaven". Shammuramat was a 9th-century BC queen of Assyria. After her young son inherited the throne, she acted as his regent for five years. The legendary figure Semiramis may be based on her.
Sharru-Ukin m Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Original Akkadian form of Sargon.
Shulmanu-Ashared m Ancient Assyrian
Original Akkadian form of Shalmaneser.
Siddhartha m Sanskrit, Bengali
Means "one who has accomplished a goal", derived from Sanskrit सिद्ध (siddha) meaning "accomplished" and अर्थ (artha) meaning "goal". Siddhartha Gautama was the real name of Buddha.
Sigdag m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and dag "day".
Sigeberht m Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman Conquest.
Sigeweard m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
Sigibert m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Siegbert.
Sigifrid m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Siegfried.
Sigihard m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sieghard.
Sigiheri m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sieger.
Sigihild f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sieghild.
Sigilind f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sieglinde.
Sigimar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Siegmar.
Sigimund m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sigmund.
Sigismund m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Form of Sigmund in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
Sigivald m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and wald "rule".
Sigiward m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of Sigurd.
Signý f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name that was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and nýr "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
Sigrún f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Silvanus m Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva meaning "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
Simon 2 m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμός (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
Simonides m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek σιμός (simos) meaning "flat-nosed" and the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This name was borne by the 7th-century BC iambic poet Simonides of Amorgos and the 6th-century BC lyric poet Simonides of Ceos.
Sin-Ahhi-Eriba m Ancient Assyrian
Original Akkadian form of Sennacherib.
Sindri m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sparkle" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf, also named Eitri. With his brother Brokkr he made several magical items for the gods, including Odin's ring Draupnir and Thor's hammer Mjölnir.
Sluaghadhán m Ancient Irish
Derived from Irish sluaghadh meaning "raid" and a diminutive suffix.
Snorri m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
Socrates m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σωκράτης (Sokrates), which was derived from σῶς (sos) meaning "whole, unwounded, safe" and κράτος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of an important Greek philosopher. He left no writings of his own; virtually everything that we know of his beliefs comes from his pupil Plato. He was sentenced to death for impiety.
Sokrates m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Socrates.
Solon m Ancient Greek
Possibly from Greek σόλος (solos) meaning "lump of iron". This was the name of an Athenian statesman who reformed the laws and government of the city.
Sólveig f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Solveig.
Sophia f English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
Sophocles m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σοφοκλῆς (Sophokles), which was derived from Greek σοφός (sophos) meaning "skilled, clever" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". Sophocles was a 5th-century BC Greek tragic poet.
Sophos m Ancient Greek
Greek form of Sophus.
Sophron m Ancient Greek
Means "self-controlled, sensible" in Greek. This name was borne by the 5th-century BC writer Sophron of Syracuse.
Sophus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σόφος (Sophos) meaning "skilled, clever".
Sosigenes m Ancient Greek
Means "born safely" from Greek σῶς (sos) meaning "safe, whole, unwounded" and γενής (genes) meaning "born". This was the name of an astronomer from Alexandria employed by Julius Caesar to correct the Roman calendar.
Sostrate f Ancient Greek
Means "safe army" from Greek σῶς (sos) meaning "safe, whole, unwounded" and στρατός (stratos) meaning "army".
Spartacus m History
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.
Spurius m Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of uncertain meaning, probably of Etruscan origin. It may be related to the Late Latin word spurius "of illegitimate birth", which was derived from Etruscan srural "public".
Stáli m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Ståle.
Steinn m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sten.
Steinunn f Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements steinn "stone" and unnr "to wave, to billow".
Stephanos m Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Greek
Greek form of Stephen. In Modern Greek it is usually transcribed Stefanos.
Stígandr m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "wanderer" in Old Norse.
Stigr m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "path" in Old Norse.
Stithulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements stiþ "hard, stiff" and wulf "wolf".
Straton m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek στρατός (stratos) meaning "army". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek philosopher.
Suibhne m Ancient Irish
Means "well-going, pleasant" in Gaelic. This was the name of several figures from early Irish history, including a 7th-century high king and an 8th-century saint. It also appears in the old Irish tale Buile Suibhne (meaning "The Madness of Suibhne") about a king who goes insane after being cursed.
Suibne m Ancient Irish
Older form of Suibhne.
Sundri m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Sondre.
Suni m Ancient Scandinavian
From Old Norse sunr meaning "son".
Sunngifu f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Sunniva.
Svantepolk m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Svatopluk. It was borne by the prominent 13th-century Swedish nobleman Svantepolk Knutsson. He may have been named after a relative of his Pomeranian mother.
Sveinn m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sven.
Sverrir m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Sverre, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Swanahilda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Swanhild.
Swiðhun m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Swithin.
Syntyche f Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from συντυχία (syntychia) meaning "occurrence, event". This is the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Philippians in the New Testament.
Tacita f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Tacitus.
Tacitus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "silent, mute" in Latin. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman historian, known for writing the Histories and the Annals.
Tahmasp m Ancient Persian
Persian form of the Avestan name Takhmaspa, which was derived from takhma "strong, brave, valiant" and aspa "horse". This name was borne by two Safavid shahs of Persia.
Tashlultum f Akkadian
Meaning unknown, presumably of Akkadian origin. It appears to end with the Akkadian feminine suffix -tum. This was the name of a wife of Sargon of Akkad.
Tata m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
Tatiana f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, French, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name Tatius. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
Tatianus m Ancient Roman
Masculine form of Tatiana.
Tatius m Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. According to Roman legend, Titus Tatius was an 8th-century BC king of the Sabines who came to jointly rule over the Romans and Sabines with the Roman king Romulus.
Telesphorus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Telesphoros (see Télesphore).
Te'oma m Ancient Aramaic
Old Aramaic form of Thomas.
Terentius m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Terence.
Tertia f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Tertius.
Tertius m Ancient Roman
This was both a Roman praenomen and a cognomen meaning "third" in Latin.
Thaïs f Ancient Greek
Possibly means "bandage" in Greek. This was the name of a companion of Alexander the Great. It was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Alexandria, a wealthy socialite who became a Christian convert, though in her case the name may have had a distinct Coptic origin. She has been a popular subject of art and literature, including an 1891 novel by Anatole France and an 1894 opera by Jules Massenet.
Thais f Ancient Greek
Alternate transcription of Ancient Greek Θαΐς (see Thaïs).
Thales m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek θάλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher and mathematician.
Thankarat m Ancient Germanic
Older Germanic form of Tancred.
Theano f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, Greek
From Greek θεά (thea) meaning "goddess". Theano was a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher associated with Pythagoras. The name was also borne by several figures from Greek mythology.
Themistocles m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεμιστοκλῆς (Themistokles) meaning "glory of the law", from θέμις (themis) meaning "law of nature, divine law" (genitive θέμιστος) and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of an Athenian statesman and general who was victorious over the Persians in the Battle of Salamis.
Themistokles m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Themistocles.
Theobald m English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bold people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
Theocritus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Θεόκριτος (Theokritos), a Greek name meaning "judge of god" from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and κριτής (krites) meaning "judge, critic". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek poet.
Theodoar m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theud "people" and war "vigilant, cautious".
Theodoard m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theud "people" and wart "watcher".
Theodora f English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Theodore. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
Theodorus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of the Greek name Theodoros (see Theodore). As a Dutch name, it is used on birth certificates though a vernacular form such as Theodoor is typically used in daily life.
Theodosius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδόσιος (Theodosios) meaning "giving to god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δόσις (dosis) meaning "giving". Saint Theodosius of Palestine was a monk who founded a monastery near Bethlehem in the 5th century. This also was the name of emperors of the Eastern Roman and Byzantine Empires.
Theodotus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεόδοτος (Theodotos) meaning "given to god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δοτός (dotos) meaning "given". This name belonged to several early saints and martyrs.
Theodulus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεόδουλος (Theodoulos) meaning "slave of god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δοῦλος (doulos) meaning "slave". This name was borne by several early saints.
Theokleia f Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Thekla.
Theophanes m Ancient Greek
Means "manifestation of God" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and φανής (phanes) meaning "appearing". This name was borne by a few saints, including an 8th-century chronicler from Constantinople and a 19th-century Russian Orthodox saint, Theophanes the Recluse, who is Феофан (Feofan) in Russian. Another famous bearer was a 14th-century Byzantine icon painter active in Moscow.
Theophilos m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of Theophilus.
Theophilus m Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεόφιλος (Theophilos) meaning "friend of god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and φίλος (philos) meaning "friend". In the New Testament the evangelist Luke addresses his gospel and the Book of Acts to a man named Theophilus.
Theophylaktos m Ancient Greek
Means "watched by god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and φυλακτέος (phylakteos) meaning "to be watched". Saint Theophylaktos was a 9th-century bishop of Nicomedia who was banished to Caria.
Theothelm m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Diethelm.
Theotimus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεότιμος (Theotimos) meaning "honouring god", derived from the elements θεός (theos) meaning "god" and τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour". Saint Theotimus was a 4th-century bishop of Tomi in Scythia.
Theotleip m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Detlef.
Theotman m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Tiedemann.
Theron m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek θηράω (therao) meaning "to hunt".
Theudelinda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Dietlinde.
Theudemar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Frankish) form of Dietmar.
Theudhar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Dieter.
Theudobald m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Theobald.
Theudofrid m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Dietfried.
Theutrich m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Theodoric.
Þiudreiks m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Gothic) form of Theodoric.
Þóra f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see Thor) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
Þórarinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with arn "eagle".
Þórbjǫrg f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's protection", from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Þórdís f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "Thor's goddess" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with Old Norse dís "goddess".
Þórfastr m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and fastr "firm".
Þórfreðr m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and friðr "peace".
Þórfríðr f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and fríðr "beautiful".
Þórgísl m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's shaft" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with gísl "shaft, arrow".
Þórir m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "Thor's warrior" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with Old Norse vér "warrior, fighter".
Þórný f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Torny.
Þórunn f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Torunn.
Þórveig f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with veig "strength".
Þórví f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with "holy".
Thracius m Ancient Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of Thracia". Thracia was a region in southeast Europe, now divided between Greece, Bulgaria and Turkey.
Þróndr m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Trond.
Thrud f Ancient Scandinavian (Anglicized)
From the Old Norse Þrúðr meaning "strength". In Norse mythology this was the name of a daughter of Thor and Sif.
Þrúðr f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Thrud.
Thucydides m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Means "glory of god", from the Greek name Θουκυδίδης (Thoukydides), derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" (genitive θεοῦ) and κῦδος (kydos) meaning "glory" with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian historian.
Thutmose m Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Τούθμωσις (Touthmosis), the Greek form of Egyptian ḏḥwtj-ms meaning "born of Thoth", itself composed of the name of the Egyptian god Thoth combined with msj "be born". Thutmose was the name of four Egyptian pharaohs of the New Kingdom, including Thutmose III who conquered Syria and Nubia.
Þýri f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Tyra.
Tiberius m Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "of the Tiber" in Latin. The Tiber is the river that runs through Rome. Tiberius was the second Roman emperor, the stepson of Emperor Augustus.
Tiglath-Pileser m Ancient Assyrian (Anglicized), Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From תִּגְלַת פִּלְאֶסֶר (Tiglat Pil'eser), the Hebrew form of Akkadian Tukulti-apil-esharra meaning "my trust is in the son of Esharra", Esharra being the main temple dedicated to the god Ashur in the city of Ashur. This was the name of three kings of Assyria, including the conqueror Tiglath-Pileser III (8th century BC), who is mentioned in the Old Testament.
Timaeus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical Latin, Biblical
Latinized form of the Greek name Τίμαιος (Timaios), derived from τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour". This is the name of one of Plato's dialogues, featuring Timaeus and Socrates. Timaeus is also the name of a person mentioned briefly in the New Testament (Mark 10:46).
Timo 3 f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Timon.
Timon m Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Dutch
Derived from Greek τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour, to esteem". It appears briefly in the New Testament. This is also the name of the main character in Shakespeare's tragedy Timon of Athens (1607).
Timothea f Ancient Greek, Greek
Feminine form of Timothy.
Titiana f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Titianus.
Titianus m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Tiziano.
Titus m Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.... [more]
Tóki m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Tyge.
Traianus m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Trajan 1.
Tryggvi m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Trygve.
Tryphon m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek τρυφή (tryphe) meaning "softness, delicacy". Saint Tryphon, a gooseherder from Syria, was martyred in the 3rd century.
Tryphosa f Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek τρυφή (tryphe) meaning "softness, delicacy". In the New Testament this name is mentioned briefly as belonging to a companion of Tryphena.
Tukulti-Ninurta m Ancient Assyrian
Means "my trust is in Ninurta", from Akkadian tukultu meaning "trust, faith" and the god's name Ninurta. This was the name of a 13th-century BC king of the Assyrian Empire.
Tullia f Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Tullius (see Tullio).
Tullius m Ancient Roman
Latin form of Tullio.
Tullus m Ancient Roman (Rare)
Roman praenomen, or given name, of unknown meaning. This was a rare praenomen.
Tutankhamon m Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian twt-ꜥnḫ-jmn meaning "image of the life of Amon", derived from twt "image" combined with ꜥnḫ "life" combined with the name of the god Amon. This was the name of an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty, most famous because of the treasures found in his tomb.
Tychon m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek τύχη (tyche) meaning "chance, luck, fortune", a derivative of τυγχάνω (tynchano) meaning "hit the mark, succeed". This was the name of a minor deity associated with Priapus in Greek mythology. It was also borne by a 5th-century saint from Cyprus.
Uhtric m Anglo-Saxon (Hypothetical)
Derived from the Old English elements uhta "pre-dawn" and ric "ruler, mighty".
Úlfr m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Ulf.
Ulrich m German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "ruler, mighty". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
Uni m Ancient Scandinavian
Probably from Old Norse una meaning "to enjoy".
Unnr f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse unnr "to wave, to billow" or unna "to love".
Valdís f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse valr "the dead" and dís "goddess".
Valens m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen (see Valentine 1). This name was borne by a 4th-century Roman emperor.
Valentina f Italian, Russian, Lithuanian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
Valentinianus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of the cognomen Valentinus (see Valentine 1). This name was borne by three Roman emperors.
Valeria f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valerius. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
Valeriana f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valerianus (see Valerian).
Valerianus m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Valerian.
Valerius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.
Varinius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name possibly derived from Varius.
Varius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "versatile" in Latin. Varius Rufus was a Roman epic poet of the 1st century BC.
Vercingetorix m Gaulish
Means "king over warriors" from Gaulish ver "on, over" combined with cingeto "marching men, warriors" and rix "king". This name was borne by a chieftain of the Gaulish tribe the Arverni. He led the resistance against Julius Caesar's attempts to conquer Gaul, but he was eventually defeated, brought to Rome, and executed.
Veremund m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Germanic name, probably Waramunt, derived from war "vigilant, cautious" and mund "protection". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Galicia (from the Germanic tribe of the Suebi). It was later the name of kings of Asturias and León, though their names are usually spelled in the Spanish form Bermudo.
Verginius m Ancient Roman
Masculine form of Virginia.
Vespasianus m Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman form of Vespasian.
Vibiana f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Vibianus.
Vibianus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of Vibius.
Vibius m Ancient Roman (Rare)
Roman praenomen and family name of unknown meaning, probably of Etruscan origin.
Vígdís f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements víg "war" and dís "goddess".
Vígi m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Viggo.
Virginia f English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
Vitus m Ancient Roman
Roman name that was derived from Latin vita "life". Saint Vitus was a child martyred in Sicily in the early 4th century. From an early date this name was confused with the Germanic name Wido.
Vragi m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname possibly meaning "mooring post".
Vulferam m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wolfram.
Vulfgang m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wolfgang.
Walahfrid m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements walha "stranger" and frid "peace".
Walchelin m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Vauquelin.
Waldeburg f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Walburga.
Waldedrudis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Waltraud.
Waldhar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Walter.
Waldo m English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
Waldobert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint (called Valbert or Gaubert in French).
Waldomar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Waldemar.
Walhberct m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements walha "stranger" and beraht "bright".
Walherich m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Valéry.
Walter m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
Walther m German, Ancient Germanic
German variant of Walter. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Walther von der Vogelweide.
Wandal m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wendel.
Wandalin m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wendelin.
Waramunt m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Veremund.
Warin m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element warin meaning "guard, protect".
Warinhari m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Werner.
Wassa f Anglo-Saxon
Meaning uncertain. It may be a short form of a longer name such as Wāðsige, composed of the elements wāð "hunt" and sige "victory".
Wazo m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wad meaning "to go" or warin meaning "guard, protect".
Wealdmær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
Wealhmær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
Wemba m Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
Wendelin m German, Ancient Germanic
Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wandal (see Wendel). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.
Werdheri m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Werther.
Widald m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and wald "power, rule".
Wido m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element witu "wood" or wit "wide". From early times this name has been confused with the Latin name Vitus.
Widogast m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and gast "stranger, guest".
Widukind m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and chind "child". This was the name of an 8th-century Saxon leader who fought against the Franks.
Wigand m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element wig meaning "war".
Wigberht m Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of Wybert. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
Wigbrand m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
Wigburg f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and burg "fortress".
Wighard m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of Wigheard.
Wigheard m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
Wigmar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of Guiomar.
Wigmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wymond.
Wigstan m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wystan.
Wilburg f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wil "will, desire" and burg "fortress".
Wilfrið m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wilfred.
Wilheard m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Willihard.
Wilhelm m German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of William. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
Willabert m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wilbert.
Willahelm m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of William.
Willamar m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and mari "famous".
Willibald m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wil "will, desire" and bald "bold". Saint Willibald was an 8th-century bishop of Eichstätt, Bavaria.
Willidrud f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Wiltrud.
Willifrid m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of Wilfred.
Willihad m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hadu "battle, combat". This was the name of an 8th-century saint active in Frisia and Saxony.
Willihard m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hard "brave, hardy".
Williric m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and ric "ruler, mighty".
Wilmǣr m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Willamar.
Wina f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element win meaning "friend".
Wine m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
Winfrið m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Winfred.
Winifrid m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of Winfrið.
Witold m Polish
Polish form of Vytautas. Alternatively it could be derived from the Germanic name Widald.
Wolf m German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of Wolfgang, Wolfram and other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
Wolfgang m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).