Names Starting with N

gender
usage
Nazli f Persian
Means "delicate, beautiful, coy" in Persian.
Nazlı f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Turkish and Azerbaijani form of Nazli.
Nazzareno m Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin Nazarenus, which meant "from Nazareth, Nazarene". Nazareth was the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. According to the New Testament, the phrase Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum meaning "Jesus the Nazarene, king of the Jews", was inscribed on the cross upon which Jesus was crucified.
Ndidi f & m Western African, Igbo
Means "patience" in Igbo.
Ndubuisi m Western African, Igbo
Means "life is foremost" in Igbo.
Nea f Swedish, Finnish
Short form of Linnéa.
Neacel m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Nicholas.
Neal m English
Variant of Neil.
Neas f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of Neasa.
Neasa f Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Ness, meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobar. She installed her son as king of Ulster by convincing Fergus mac Róich (her husband and Conchobar's stepfather) to give up his throne to the boy for a year and then helping him rule so astutely that the Ulstermen demanded that he remain as king. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa "gentle", but was renamed Ní-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.
Nebet-Hut f Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of Nephthys.
Nebil m Turkish
Turkish form of Nabil.
Nebile f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Nabil.
Nebo m Biblical
Form of Nabu used in the Old Testament.
Nebojša m Serbian, Croatian
Means "fearless" in Serbian and Croatian.
Nebrod m Biblical Greek
Form of Nimrod used in the Greek Old Testament.
Nebuchadnezzar m Babylonian (Anglicized), Biblical
From נְבוּכַדְנֶאצֲּר (Nevukhadnetzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Nabu-kudurri-usur meaning "Nabu protect my eldest son", derived from the god's name Nabu combined with kudurru meaning "eldest son" and an imperative form of naṣāru meaning "to protect". This name was borne by a 12th-century BC king of the Babylonian Empire. It was also borne by a 6th-century BC king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He captured Jerusalem, and ultimately destroyed the city's temple and deported many of its citizens, as told in the Old Testament.
Nechtan m Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Irish name of uncertain meaning, possibly from a Celtic root meaning "damp" (cognate with Neptune). In Irish mythology Nechtan was the husband of Boann, the goddess of the River Boyne. He is sometimes identified with Nuada. This name was borne by the 5th-century Saint Nectan of Hartland in Devon, who was supposedly born in Ireland. It was also the name of several kings of the Picts (described mostly from Gaelic sources, this may represent a Pictish cognate).
Necla f Turkish
Turkish form of Najla.
Necoda m Biblical Latin
Form of Nekoda used in the Latin Old Testament.
Neculai m Romanian
Romanian variant form of Nicholas.
Ned m English
Diminutive of Edward or Edmund. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
Neda 2 f Persian
Persian form of Nida.
Nedelcho m Bulgarian
Masculine form of Nedelya.
Nedeljka f Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of Nedeljko.
Nedeljko m Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Croatian nedjelja and Serbian недеља (nedelja) meaning "Sunday".
Nedelka f Macedonian
Macedonian feminine form of Nedeljko.
Nedelko m Macedonian
Macedonian form of Nedeljko.
Nedelya f Bulgarian
Means "Sunday" in Bulgarian.
Nediljka f Croatian
Feminine form of Nedeljko.
Nedim m Turkish, Bosnian
Turkish and Bosnian form of Nadim.
Nedyalka f Bulgarian
Bulgarian feminine form of Nedeljko.
Nedyalko m Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of Nedeljko.
Neea f Finnish
Short form of Linnea.
Neela f Tamil, Indian, Hindi
Alternate transcription of Tamil நீலா or Hindi नीला (see Nila).
Neelam f & m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi नीलम (see Nilam).
Neelima f Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Telugu
Alternate transcription of Marathi/Hindi नीलिमा or Telugu నీలిమ (see Nilima).
Neeltje f Dutch
Diminutive of Cornelia.
Neely m & f English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized and reduced form of Gaelic Mac an Fhilidh (or McNeilly) meaning "son of the poet".
Neema f Eastern African, Swahili
Means "divine grace" in Swahili, from Arabic نعمة (ni'mah) meaning "blessing".
Neemias m Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Nehemiah used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Neer m Limburgish
Short form of Reneer.
Neeraj m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi नीरज or Gujarati નીરજ (see Niraj).
Nefeli f Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Nephele.
Neferkare m Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian nfr-kꜣ-rꜥ meaning "the soul of Ra is beautiful", from nfr "beautiful, good" combined with kꜣ "soul" combined with the name of the god Ra. This name was borne by several Egyptian pharaohs.
Nefertari f Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom (13th century BC), the favourite wife of Ramesses II.
Nefertiti f Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian nfrt-jjtj meaning "the beautiful one has come". Nefertiti was a powerful Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom (14th century BC), the principal wife of Akhenaton, the pharaoh that briefly imposed a monotheistic religion centered around the sun god Aton.
Neferuptah f Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian nfrw-ptḥ meaning "beauty of Ptah", from nfrw "beauty, perfection" combined with the name of the god Ptah. This was the name of a sister of the pharaoh Neferusobek.
Neferusobek f Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian nfrw-sbk meaning "beauty of Sobek", derived from nfrw "beauty, perfection" combined with the name of the god Sobek. This is the name of the earliest known female pharaoh of Egypt, ruling in the 12th dynasty (19th century BC). Her name is typically found with the hieroglyphs in reverse order, as Sobekneferu, though it is assumed this was only done to place the god's name first in writing.
Nefes f Turkish (Modern)
Means "breath" in Turkish.
Nefise f Turkish
Turkish form of Nafisa.
Negar f Persian
Means "beloved" in Persian.
Negin f Persian
Means "gemstone" in Persian.
Neha f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Kannada, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali, Telugu
Possibly from Sanskrit स्नेह (sneha) meaning "love, tenderness".
Nehemiah m Biblical
Means "Yahweh comforts" in Hebrew, derived from נָחַם (nacham) meaning "to comfort" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. According to the Book of Nehemiah in the Old Testament he was a leader of the Jews who was responsible for the rebuilding of Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian captivity.
Nehir f Turkish
Means "river" in Turkish.
Nehuén m Indigenous American, Mapuche (Hispanicized)
Variant of Newen using Spanish spelling conventions.
Neifion m Welsh (Rare)
Welsh form of Neptune.
Neil m Irish, Scottish, English
From the Irish name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly connected to the old Celtic root *nītu- "fury, passion" or the (possibly related) Old Irish word nia "hero". A derivation from Old Irish nél "cloud" has also been suggested. This was the name of a few early Irish kings, notably Niall of the Nine Hostages, a semi-legendary high king of the 4th or 5th century.... [more]
Neilina f Scottish
Feminine form of Neil.
Neilos m Greek Mythology, Late Greek
Greek name of the Nile River, possibly of Semitic origin meaning "river". In Greek mythology he was the god of the Nile, the son of Okeanos and Tethys.... [more]
Neirin m Old Welsh
Variant of Aneirin.
Neith f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian nt, possibly from nt "water" or nrw "fear, dread". This was the name of an early Egyptian goddess of weaving, hunting and war. Her character may have some correspondences with the goddesses Tanith, Anat or Athena.
Neizan m Spanish (Modern)
Spanish form of Nathan, reflecting the English pronunciation.
Neja f Slovene
Diminutive of Jerneja.
Nejc m Slovene
Diminutive of Jernej.
Nejla 1 f Turkish
Turkish form of Najla.
Nejla 2 f Bosnian
Bosnian form of Naila.
Nekane f Basque
Means "sorrows" in Basque. It is an equivalent of Dolores, coined by Sabino Arana in his 1910 list of Basque saints names.
Nekesa f Eastern African, Luhya
Feminine form of Wekesa.
Nekoda m Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Means "marked" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the head of a family of temple servants.
Nektaria f Greek
Feminine form of Nektarios.
Nektarios m Greek, Late Greek
Derived from Greek νέκταρ (nektar) meaning "nectar, drink of the gods".
Nela f Croatian, Slovak, Portuguese, Czech
Short form of names ending in nela, such as Antonela.
Nelda f English
Possibly an elaboration of Nell using the popular phonetic suffix da.
Nele f German, Flemish, Estonian
Diminutive of Cornelia.
Neli f Bulgarian
Diminutive of Nedelya or Aneliya.
Nélida f Literature, Spanish
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel Nélida (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name Daniel.
Nelinha f Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Manuela.
Nelinho m Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Manuel.
Nell f English
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as Eleanor, Ellen 1 or Helen. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
Nella f Italian
Short form of Antonella.
Nelle f English
Variant of Nell.
Nelli f Russian, Finnish, Hungarian
Russian, Finnish and Hungarian form of Nellie.
Nellie f English, Swedish
Diminutive of Nell and other names containing nel.
Nello m Italian
Short form of names ending in nello, such as Brunello or Antonello.
Nelly f English, Swedish, French, German
Diminutive of Nell and other names containing nel.
Nels m Danish (Rare)
Danish variant of Nils.
Nélson m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Nelson.
Nelson m English, Spanish
From an English surname meaning "son of Neil". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
Nelu m Romanian
Romanian diminutive of Ion 1.
Nemanja m Serbian
Possibly from Slavic ne maniti meaning "not deceiving, not luring, not attracting". Another theory states that it means "without possessions", derived from Serbo-Croatian nemati meaning "have not". This was the name of a 12th-century Serbian king, and the name of the dynasty he began.
Nemesis f Greek Mythology
Means "distribution of what is due, righteous anger" in Greek. In Greek mythology Nemesis was the personification of vengeance and justice.
Nemo m Literature
Means "nobody" in Latin. This was the name used by author Jules Verne for the captain of the Nautilus in his novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870). It was later used for the title character (a fish) in the 2003 animated movie Finding Nemo.
Nena f English
Variant of Nina 1, also coinciding with the Spanish word nena meaning "baby girl".
Nenad m Serbian, Croatian
Means "unexpected" in Serbian and Croatian. In the Serbian folk song Predrag and Nenad this is the name of Predrag's brother.
Nennius m History
Meaning unknown, presumably a Latinized form of a Brythonic name (perhaps Nynniaw). According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a British prince who fought against the invading forces of Julius Caesar. It was also borne by a 9th-century Welsh monk, traditionally credited with authoring the History of the Britons.
Neno m Serbian, Croatian
Diminutive of Nenad.
Nensi f Croatian
Croatian form of Nancy.
Neo 1 f & m Southern African, Tswana
Means "gift" in Tswana, a derivative of naya "to give".
Neo 2 m Various
From a prefix meaning "new", ultimately from Greek νέος (neos).... [more]
Neofit m Bulgarian (Rare), Macedonian (Rare)
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Neophytos.
Neofytos m Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Neophytos.
Neohne'e f Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "walks toward woman", from Cheyenne nėh- "toward" and -ehné "walk" combined with the feminine suffix -e'é.
Neon m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek νέος (neos) meaning "new".
Neophytos m Ancient Greek
Greek name meaning "new plant, new child", from a word that was derived from νέος (neos) meaning "new" and φυτόν (phyton) meaning "plant".
Neoptolemus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νεοπτόλεμος (Neoptolemos) meaning "new war", derived from νέος (neos) meaning "new" combined with an Epic Greek form of πόλεμος (polemos) meaning "war". In Greek legend this was the name of the son of Achilles, brought into the Trojan War because it was prophesied the Greeks could not win it unless he was present. After the war he was slain by Orestes fighting over Hermione.
Nephele f Greek Mythology
From Greek νέφος (nephos) meaning "cloud". In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.
Nephi m Mormon
Meaning unknown. This name is used in the Book of Mormon as the name of a prophet, the son of Lehi and Sariah. He was supposedly the founder of the Nephite people in the Americas.
Nephthys f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian nbt-ḥwt (reconstructed as Nebet-Hut) meaning "lady of the house", derived from nbt "lady" and ḥwt "house". This was the name of an Egyptian goddess associated with the air, death and mourning. She was wife of the desert god Seth.
Neptune m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh- "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
Neptuno m Roman Mythology (Hispanicized, Portuguese-style)
Spanish and European Portuguese form of Neptune.
Nere f Basque
From Basque nere, a dialectal variant of nire meaning "mine".
Nerea f Basque, Spanish
Possibly from Basque nere, a dialectal variant of nire meaning "mine". Alternatively, it could be a feminine form of Nereus. This name arose in Basque-speaking regions of Spain in the first half of the 20th century, though it is now popular throughout the country.
Nereida f Spanish
Derived from Greek Νηρηΐδες (Nereides) meaning "nymphs, sea sprites", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nereo m Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Italian and Spanish form of Nereus.
Nereus m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Derived from Greek νηρός (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
Nergis f Turkish
Means "daffodil, narcissus" in Turkish, ultimately derived from Greek (see Narcissus).
Nergüi m & f Mongolian
Means "no name" in Mongolian. This name was traditionally given in order to mislead bad spirits.
Neriah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lamp of Yahweh" in Hebrew, from נֵר (ner) meaning "lamp, light" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of the father of Baruch in the Old Testament.
Nerida f Indigenous Australian
Possibly means "water lily" in an Australian Aboriginal language.
Nerina f Italian
Probably from Greek Νηρηΐδες (see Nereida). This name was used by Torquato Tasso for a character in his play Aminta (1573), and subsequently by Giacomo Leopardi in his poem Le Ricordanze (1829).
Nerio m Italian
Possibly a variant of Nereo.
Nerissa f Literature
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρηΐς (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nermin m & f Bosnian, Turkish, Arabic (Egyptian)
From Persian نرم (narm) meaning "soft, gentle". It is typically masculine in Bosnian, and feminine in Turkish and Arabic.
Nermina f Bosnian
Bosnian feminine form of Nermin.
Nero 1 m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigorous". It was used by a prominent branch of the gens Claudia starting from the 3rd century BC. It was borne most famously by a Roman emperor of the 1st century, remembered as a tyrant. His birth name was Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, but after he was adopted as the heir of Claudius his name became Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus.
Nero 2 m Italian
Short form of Raniero. It also coincides with the Italian word nero meaning "black".
Nerses m Armenian
Armenian form of Middle Persian Narseh (see Narses). Saint Nerses was a 4th-century patriarch of the Armenian Church.
Nerthus f Germanic Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Germanic *Nerþuz, which is also the root of the Old Norse god's name Njǫrðr (see Njord). Nerthus was a Germanic goddess of fertility as described by the Roman historian Tacitus in the 1st century.
Nerþuz f & m Germanic Mythology (Hypothetical)
Proto-Germanic reconstruction of Nerthus and Njord.
Nerva m Ancient Roman, History
Roman cognomen derived from Latin nervus "strength". This is the name by which the 1st-century Roman emperor Marcus Cocceius Nerva is commonly known.
Nerys f Welsh
Probably a feminized form of Welsh nêr meaning "lord".
Nes f Dutch (Rare)
Dutch short form of Agnes.
Neşe f Turkish
Means "joy, happiness" in Turkish.
Nesim m & f Turkish
Turkish form of Nasim.
Neske f Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Agnes.
Nesrîn f Kurdish
Means "eglantine, sweetbrier" in Kurdish.
Nesrin f Turkish
Turkish form of Nasrin.
Ness 1 f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of Neasa.
Ness 2 f English
Short form of Vanessa.
Nessa 1 f English
Short form of Vanessa and other names ending in nessa.
Nessa 2 f Hebrew (Rare)
Means "miracle" in Hebrew.
Nessa 3 f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Neasa.
Nest f Welsh
Medieval Welsh diminutive of Agnes.
Nesta f Welsh
Medieval Welsh diminutive of Agnes.
Nestan f Georgian
From the first part of Nestan-Darejan.
Nestan-Darejan f Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for a character in his 12th-century epic The Knight in the Panther's Skin. Rustaveli derived it from the Persian phrase نیست اندر جهان (nist andar jahan) meaning "unlike any other in the world" or "unique". In the poem Nestan-Darejan is a princess loved by Tariel.
Nestani f Georgian
Form of Nestan with the nominative suffix, used when the name is written stand-alone.
Néstor m Spanish
Spanish form of Nestor.
Nestor m Greek Mythology, Russian, Portuguese, French
Means "returner, homecomer" in Greek, from νέομαι (neomai) meaning "to return". In Homer's Iliad this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.
Nestore m Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Nestor.
Nestori m Finnish
Finnish form of Nestor.
Neta f & m Hebrew
Means "plant, shrub" in Hebrew.
Netan'el m Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of Nathanael.
Netanel m Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of Nathanael.
Nethaneel m Biblical
Form of Nathanael used in some versions of the Old Testament.
Nethanel m Biblical
Form of Nathanael used in some versions of the Old Testament.
Nethaniah m Biblical
Means "Yahweh has given" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Ishmael (the assassin of Gedaliah), as well as other minor characters.
Netsai f Southern African, Shona
From Shona netsa meaning "trouble, annoy, bother".
Netta 1 f English
Short form of names ending in netta.
Netta 2 f Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew נֶטַע (see Neta).
Nettie f English
Diminutive of names ending in nette, such as Annette or Jeanette.
Netuno m Roman Mythology (Portuguese-style)
Brazilian Portuguese form of Neptune.
Neus f Catalan
Catalan cognate of Nieves.
Neva f English
Short form of Geneva.
Nevada f & m English
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
Nevaeh f English (Modern)
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000. Over the next few years it rapidly climbed the rankings in America, peaking at the 25th rank for girls in 2010.
Nevan m Irish
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Neve f Irish
Anglicized form of Niamh.
Neven m Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Masculine form of Nevena.
Nevena f Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".
Neves f Portuguese
Portuguese form of Nieves.
Neville m English (British)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Norman French. As a given name it is chiefly British and Australian.
Nevio m Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Naevius, which was derived from Latin naevus "mole (on the body)". A famous bearer was the 3rd-century BC Roman poet Gnaeus Naevius.
Nevra f Turkish
Turkish form of Nawra.
Newen m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "force, strength" in Mapuche.
Newt m English
Short form of Newton.
Newton m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English physicist Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
Neža f Slovene
Slovene form of Agnes.
Nezih m Turkish
Turkish form of Nazih.
Nezihe f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Nazih.
Ngải m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (ngải) meaning "sagebrush, wormwood".
Ngaio f Maori
Maori name that is derived from the name of a type of tree, also called the mousehole tree. This name was borne by New Zealand crime writer Dame Ngaio Marsh (1895-1982).
Ngaire f Maori
Possibly from the name of the town of Ngaere in New Zealand, of Maori origin meaning "wetland".
Ngawang m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "powerful speech" in Tibetan, from ངག (ngag) meaning "speech" and དབང (dbang) meaning "power, force".
Ngọc f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (ngọc) meaning "jade, precious stone, gem".
Ngozi f Western African, Igbo
Means "blessing" in Igbo.
Nguyên m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (nguyên) meaning "original, first".
Nguyệt f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (nguyệt) meaning "moon".
Nhung f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (nhung) meaning "velvet".
Nia 1 f Welsh
Welsh form of Niamh. The Welsh poet T. Gwynn Jones used it in his long poem Tir na n-Óg (1916), referring to the lover of Oisín.
Nia 2 f Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means "purpose, aim" in Swahili.
Nia 3 f English, Georgian
Short form of Antonia, Sidonia and other names ending in nia.
Niall m Irish, Old Irish
Irish form of Neil.
Níam f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of Niamh.
Niamh f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god Manannán mac Lir in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, the son of Fionn mac Cumhaill. It has been used as a given name for people only since the early 20th century.
Nic m English
Short form of Nicholas, or sometimes Dominic.
Nicanor m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Spanish
From the Greek name Νικάνωρ (Nikanor), which was derived from νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". This name was borne by several notable officers from ancient Macedon. It is also mentioned in the New Testament as belonging to one of the original seven deacons of the church, considered a saint.
Niccolò m Italian
Italian form of Nicholas. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.
Nichelle f African American
Combination of Nicole and Michelle. This name spiked in popularity in the late 1960s when the actress Nichelle Nichols (1932-2022) portrayed Nyota Uhura on the Star Trek television series. Nichols was given the name Grace at birth but it was changed at a young age.
Nichola f English (British)
Chiefly British feminine form of Nicholas.
Nicholas m English
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
Nichole f English
Variant of Nicole.
Niĉjo m Esperanto
Esperanto diminutive of Nicholas.
Nick m English, Dutch
Short form of Nicholas. It is borne by the comic character Nick Bottom in Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
Nicki f English
Diminutive of Nicole.
Nicky m & f English
Diminutive of Nicholas or Nicole.
Nico m Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of Nicholas (or sometimes Nicodemus).
Nicodemo m Italian, Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Nicodemus.
Nicodemus m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νικόδημος (Nikodemos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.
Nicol 1 m Medieval English, Scottish
Medieval English and Scottish form of Nicholas. This was the middle name of a character in the novel Rob Roy (1817) by Walter Scott.
Nicol 2 f Spanish (Latin American), Czech
Spanish and Czech form of Nicole.
Nicola 1 m Italian
Italian form of Nicholas. A notable bearer was the 13th-century sculptor Nicola Pisano.
Nicola 2 f German, English
Feminine form of Nicholas. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
Nicolaas m Dutch
Dutch form of Nicholas.
Nicolae m Romanian
Romanian form of Nicholas.
Nicolai m Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant form of Nicholas.
Nicolao m Italian (Rare)
Italian variant form of Nicholas.
Nicolaos m Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Νικόλαος (see Nikolaos).
Nicolás m Spanish
Spanish form of Nicholas.
Nicolas m French
French form of Nicholas.
Nicolasa f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Nicholas.
Nicolau m Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Portuguese, Galician and Catalan form of Nicholas.
Nicolaus m German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikolaos (see Nicholas). This form is also used in Germany as a variant of Nikolaus.
Nicole f French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Nicholas, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
Nicoleta f Romanian
Romanian feminine form of Nicholas.
Nicoletta f Italian
Feminine diminutive of Nicola 1.
Nicolette f French
Diminutive of Nicole.
Nicolina f Italian
Feminine diminutive of Nicola 1.
Nicoline f Dutch
Diminutive of Nicole.
Nicolino m Italian
Italian diminutive of Nicola 1.
Nicolò m Italian
Italian variant form (particularly Sicilian) of Nicholas.
Nicte f Indigenous American, Mayan (Hispanicized)
From Yucatec Maya nikte' meaning "flower" or specifically "plumeria flower". It is derived from Classic Maya nich "flower" and te' "tree".
Nicu m Romanian
Diminutive of Nicolae.
Nicușor m Romanian
Diminutive of Nicolae.
Nida f Arabic, Turkish, Urdu
Means "call, proclaim" in Arabic.
Nidia f Spanish
Variant of Nydia.
Niek m Dutch
Short form of Nicolaas.
Niels 1 m Danish
Danish form of Nicholas. A famous bearer was Niels Bohr (1885-1962), a Danish physicist who investigated the structure of atoms.
Niels 2 m Dutch
Dutch short form of Cornelius.
Nienke f Frisian
Frisian diminutive of Katherine.
Nieves f Spanish
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
Nîga f Kurdish
Means "look, gaze" in Kurdish, of Persian origin.
Nigar f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Negar.
Nigel m English
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of Neil. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Walter Scott's novel The Fortunes of Nigel (1822).
Nigella f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Nigel.
Nigina f Tajik, Uzbek
Tajik and Uzbek form of Negin.
Nigora f Uzbek, Tajik
Uzbek and Tajik form of Negar.
Nigul m Estonian
Estonian form of Nicholas.
Nihad m Bosnian, Azerbaijani
Bosnian and Azerbaijani form of Nihat.
Nihal 1 f Arabic, Turkish
Means "drink" in Arabic.
Nihal 2 m Indian, Hindi
Means "content, happy" in Hindi.
Nihat m Turkish
Possibly from Persian نهاد (nehad) meaning "nature, disposition".
Nii m Western African, Ga
From a Ga word used as a masculine royal title.
Niillas m Sami
Sami form of Nils.
Niilo m Finnish
Finnish form of Nicholas.
Niina f Finnish
Short form of Anniina.
Nijolė f Lithuanian
Meaning unknown. This was possibly the name of a Lithuanian goddess of the underworld (according to the Polish-Lithuanian historian Teodor Narbutt).
Nika 1 f & m Russian
Russian short form of Veronika and other names ending in nika. It can also be a short form of Nikita 1 (masculine).
Nika 2 f Slovene, Croatian
Feminine form of Nikola 1.
Nika 3 m Georgian
Diminutive of Nikoloz.
Nikandr m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Nikandros.
Nikandros m Ancient Greek
Means "victory of a man" from the Greek elements νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). This was the name of a 2nd-century BC Greek poet and grammarian from Colophon.
Nīkau m Maori
From the name of a type of palm tree found in New Zealand (species Rhopalostylis sapida).
Nike f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.
Nikephoros m & f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "carrying victory" from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and φέρω (phero) meaning "to carry, to bear". This name was borne by several Byzantine emperors, including the 10th-century Nikephoros II Phokas. Besides being a masculine personal name, it was also a title borne by the goddess Athena.