Masculine Names

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WARAMUNTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of VEREMUND.
WARCISŁAWmPolish (Archaic)
Polish form of VRATISLAV. This was the name of several dukes of Pomerania.
WARDmEnglish
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARDELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "watch hill" in Old English.
WARINmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element warin meaning "guard, protect".
WARINHARImAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WERNER.
WARNERmEnglish
From a Norman surname which was derived from the given name WERNER.
WARRENmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
WARRICKmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICKmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WASHINGTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WASImArabic
Means "broad-minded, liberal, learned" in Arabic.
WASIMmArabic
Means "handsome" in Arabic.
WASSIMmArabic
Variant transcription of WASIM.
WASSWAmEastern African, Ganda
Means "first of twins" in Luganda.
WASYLmUkrainian
Variant transcription of VASYL.
WATmEnglish
Medieval short form of WALTER.
WATEmFrisian
Possibly a Frisian short form of WALTER.
WATSEmFrisian
Diminutive of WATE.
WATTANAf & mThai
Means "development" in Thai.
WAWATAMmNative American, Ojibwe
Means "little goose" in Ojibwe. This was the name of an 18th-century chief of the Ottawa people.
WAWRZYNIECmPolish
Polish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
WAYANm & fIndonesian, Balinese
From Balinese wayah meaning "old, mature", ultimately from Sanskrit वयस् (vayas) meaning "energy, strength, age". This name is traditionally given to the first-born child.
WAYLANDmEnglish
From Weland, the Old English cognate of WIELAND.
WAYLONmEnglish
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.
WAYNAmNative American, Quechua
Means "young" in Quechua.
WAYNEmEnglish
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WAYRAmNative American, Quechua
Means "wind" in Quechua.
WAZOmAncient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wad meaning "to go" or warin meaning "guard, protect".
WEALDMÆRmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WEALHMÆRmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
WEBSTERmEnglish
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WEIm & fChinese
From Chinese (wēi) meaning "power, pomp", (wēi) meaning "high, lofty, towering" or (wěi) meaning "great, robust, extraordinary". As a feminine name it can come from (wēi) meaning "small" or (wēi) meaning "fern". This name can be formed by other Chinese characters besides those shown here.
WEKESAmEastern African, Luhya
Means "born during harvest" in Luhya.
WELDONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill near a spring" in Old English.
WEMBAmAnglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WENm & fChinese
From Chinese (wén) meaning "literature, culture, writing", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
WENCESLASmHistory
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
WENCESLAUSmHistory
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
WENDELmDutch, German (Rare)
Old short form of Germanic names beginning with the element Wandal meaning "a Vandal". The Vandals were a Germanic tribe who invaded Spain and North Africa in the 5th century. The tribal name was later applied to other groups such as the Wends, a Slavic people living between the Elbe and the Oder.
WENDELINmGerman, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element Wandal (see WENDEL). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.
WENDELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the given name WENDEL.
WENZELmGerman
Medieval German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
WENZESLAUSmGerman
German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
WERDHERImAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WERTHER.
WERNERmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army".
WERTHERmGerman (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements wert "worthy" and hari "army". Goethe used this name in his novel 'The Sorrows of Young Werther' (1774).
WESmEnglish
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESSELmFrisian, Dutch, German
Diminutive of WERNER.
WESTLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of WESLEY.
WESTONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west town" in Old English.
WETZELmGerman
Diminutive of WERNER.
WHITAKERmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
WHITNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIBAWAmIndonesian
Means "authority, power" in Indonesian.
WIBOmFrisian, Dutch
Diminutive of WIEBE.
WIBOWOmIndonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of WIBAWA.
WICKANINNISHmNative American, Nuu-chah-nulth
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in the Nuu-chah-nulth (or Nootka) language. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
WIDALDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and wald "power, rule".
WIDEmFrisian
Frisian form of WIDO.
WIDOmAncient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element witu "wood" or wit "wide". From early times this name has been confused with the Latin name Vitus.
WIDOGASTmAncient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and gast "stranger, guest".
WIDUKINDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and chind "child". This was the name of an 8th-century Saxon leader who fought against the Franks.
WIEBEmFrisian, Dutch, German
Medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element wig meaning "war".
WIĘCESŁAWmPolish (Archaic)
Older Polish form of VÁCLAV.
WIEGANDmGerman (Rare)
Modern German form of WIGAND.
WIELANDmGerman, Germanic Mythology
Meaning uncertain, perhaps a derivative of Germanic wela meaning "skilled, artful". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WIELISŁAWmPolish (Rare)
From an old Slavic name which meant "great glory".
WIESŁAWmPolish
Short form of WIELISŁAW.
WIGANDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element wig meaning "war".
WIGBERHTmAnglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of WYBERT. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
WIGBRANDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
WIGHEARDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYOT.
WIGMARmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of GUIOMAR.
WIGMUNDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYMOND.
WIGSTANmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYSTAN.
WIKTORmPolish
Polish form of VICTOR.
WILm & fEnglish, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILBERTmDutch
Means "bright will", derived from the Germanic elements wil "will, desire" and beraht "bright".
WILBURmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
WILBURNmEnglish
From a surname which was probably originally derived from an unknown place name. The second element corresponds with Old English burne "stream".
WILEYmEnglish
From a surname which was derived either from a place name meaning "temple clearing" in Old English or from a nickname meaning "wily, tricky" in Middle English.
WILFmEnglish
Short form of WILFRED.
WILFORDmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow ford" in Old English.
WILFREDmEnglish
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILFREDOmSpanish
Spanish form of WILFRED.
WILFRIEDmGerman
German cognate of WILFRED.
WILFRIÐmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of WILFRED.
WILHEARDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLIHARD.
WILHELMmGerman, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WILHELMUSmDutch
Latinized form of WILHELM. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
WILKIEmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKINmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILKYmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILLmEnglish
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLABERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WILBERT.
WILLAHELMmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WILLIAM.
WILLAMARmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and mari "famous".
WILLARDmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLEMmDutch
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.
WILLImGerman
Diminutive of WILHELM.
WILLIAMmEnglish
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.... [more]
WILLIEm & fEnglish
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
WILLIFRIDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WILFRED.
WILLIHARDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hard "brave, hardy".
WILLIRICmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and ric "power, rule".
WILLISmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from Will, a diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILLKAmNative American, Aymara
Means "sun" in Aymara.
WILLOUGHBYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
WILLYm & fEnglish, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WILMǢRmAnglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLAMAR.
WILMERmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILMOTm & fMedieval English
Medieval diminutive and feminine form of WILLIAM.
WILSONmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "son of WILLIAM". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
WILTmEnglish
Short form of WILTON. This name was borne by basketball player Wilt Chamberlain (1936-1999).
WILTONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the names of several English towns. The town names mean variously "willow town", "well town" or "town on the River Wylye" in Old English. The river name is itself of Celtic origin, possibly meaning "tricky".
WIMmDutch, German
Dutch and German short form of WILLEM or WILHELM.
WINCENTYmPolish
Polish form of VINCENT.
WINDSORm & fEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "riverbank with a windlass" in Old English (a windlass is a lifting apparatus). This has been the surname of the royal family of the United Kingdom since 1917.
WINEmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFREDmEnglish
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace". This was the birth name of the 8th-century missionary Saint Boniface. It became rare after the Norman conquest, though it was revived in the 19th century.
WINFRIEDmGerman
German form of WINFRED.
WINFRIÐmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WINIFRIDmAncient Germanic
Germanic cognate of WINFRIÐ.
WINSLOWmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
WINSTONmEnglish
From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name WYNNSTAN. A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (1874-1965), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's 1949 novel '1984'.
WINTHROPmEnglish
From a surname which was originally taken from town names meaning either "WINE's village" or "WIGMUND's village" in Old English.
WINTONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE" in Old English.
WIRAmIndonesian, Malay
Means "hero" in Indonesian and Malay, ultimately from Sanskrit वीर (vira).
WIREMUmMaori
Maori form of WILLIAM.
WISDOMf & mEnglish (Rare)
Simply from the English word, a derivative of Old English wis "wise".
WITmPolish
Polish form of VITUS or WIDO.
WITEKmPolish
Diminutive of WITOLD.
WITOŁDmPolish (Archaic)
Polish variant of WITOLD.
WITOLDmPolish, German
Polish form of VYTAUTAS. Alternatively it could be derived from the Germanic name WIDALD.
WŁADEKmPolish
Diminutive of WŁADYSŁAW.
WŁADYSŁAWmPolish
Polish cognate of VLADISLAV. This was the name of four kings of Poland.
WŁODZIMIERZmPolish
Polish cognate of VLADIMIR.
WOBmFrisian, Dutch
Frisian diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wald meaning "rule".
WOBBEm & fFrisian
Variant and feminine form of WOB.
WODANmGermanic Mythology
Continental Germanic cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN).
WODENmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN). The day of the week Wednesday is named for him.
WOJCIECHmPolish
Derived from the Slavic elements voji "soldier" and tekha "solace, comfort, joy". Saint Wojciech (also known by the Czech form of his name Vojtěch or his adopted name Adalbert) was a Bohemian missionary to Hungary, Poland and Prussia, where he was martyred.
WOJTEKmPolish
Diminutive of WOJCIECH.
WOLFmGerman, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
WOLFGANGmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WOLFRAMmGerman
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn "raven".
WÖLLEMmLimburgish
Limburgish form of WILLIAM.
WOLODYMYRmUkrainian
Variant transcription of VOLODYMYR.
WOLTERmDutch
Dutch variant form of WALTER.
WOODIEmEnglish
Variant of WOODY.
WOODROWmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. This name was popularized by American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
WOODYmEnglish
Either a diminutive of WOODROW, or else from a nickname derived from the English word wood. A famous bearer is film director Woody Allen (1935-).
WOO-JINmKorean
Variant transcription of U-JIN.
WORKNEHmEastern African, Amharic
Means "you are gold", from Amharic ወርቅ (warq) meaning "gold".
WOUTERmDutch
Dutch form of WALTER.
WRIGHTmEnglish
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.
WUm & fChinese
From Chinese () meaning "military, martial" (which is generally only masculine) or () meaning "affairs, business", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly. This was the name of several Chinese rulers, including the 2nd-century BC emperor Wu of Han (name spelled ) who expanded the empire and made Confucianism the state philosophy.
WUBBEmFrisian, Dutch
Variant of WOB.
WULFmGerman
Variant of WOLF.
WULFNOÐmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest.
WULFRICmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of ULRIC.
WULFSIGEmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
WULFSTANmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
WULLEMmLimburgish
Limburgish form of WILLIAM.
WUMmLimburgish
Short form of WULLEM.
WYATTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
WYBERTmMedieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
WYMONDmMedieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
WYNmWelsh
Derived from Welsh gwyn meaning "blessed, white, fair".
WYNFORmWelsh
Variant of GWYNFOR.
WYNNmWelsh
Variant of WYN.
WYNNE (1)m & fWelsh
Variant of WYN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
WYNNE (2)mEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WINE.
WYNNSTANmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wynn "joy" and stan "stone".
WYOTmMedieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigheard, composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
WYSTANmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
XABImBasque
Basque diminutive of XAVIER.
XABIERmBasque, Galician
Basque and Galician form of XAVIER.
XACOBEmGalician
Galician form of JACOB (or JAMES).
XAIMEmGalician
Galician form of JAMES.
XANDEmPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ALEXANDRE.
XANDERmDutch, English (Modern)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
XANDINHOmPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ALEXANDRE.
XANTHIPPOSmAncient Greek
From the Greek elements ξανθος (xanthos) "yellow" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian general.
XANTHOSmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow". This is the name of several figures, mostly minor, in Greek mythology.
XANTImBasque
Basque form of SANTIAGO.
XAVERmGerman
German form of XAVIER.
XAVImCatalan
Catalan diminutive of XAVIER.
XAVIERmEnglish, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was borne in a village of this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
XENAGORASmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreign, strange" and αγορα (agora) meaning "assembly, marketplace". This was the name of a 2nd-century BC Greek historian.
XENOCRATESmAncient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Ξενοκρατης (Xenokrates), which was derived from ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest" and κρατος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher.
XENONmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest".
XENOPHONmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreign, strange" and φωνη (phone) meaning "voice". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Greek historian.
XERXESmHistory
Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha which meant "ruler over heroes". This was a 5th-century BC king of Persia, the son of Darius the Great. He attempted an invasion of Greece, which ended unsuccessfully at the battle of Salamis.
XESÚSmGalician
Galician form of JESUS, used as a personal name.
XHAFERmAlbanian
Albanian form of JAFAR.
XIAm & fChinese
From Chinese (xià) meaning "summer, great, grand", (xiá) meaning "rosy clouds", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
XIÁNmGalician
From Xulián, the Galician form of JULIAN.
XIANGm & fChinese
From Chinese (xiáng) meaning "soar, glide", (xiáng) meaning "good luck, good omen", (xiāng) meaning "fragrant" (which is usually only feminine) or (xiāng), which refers to the Xiang River in southern China. This name can also be formed from other characters.
XIMENOmMedieval Spanish
Medieval Spanish or Basque name of uncertain meaning. It is possibly a form of SIMON (1), though it may in fact derive from Basque seme meaning "son".
XIMOmCatalan
Valencian diminutive of JOAQUIM.
XIMUNmBasque
Basque form of XIMENO.
XINYIm & fChinese
From Chinese (xīn) meaning "happy, joyous, delighted" or (xīn) meaning "heart, mind, soul" combined with () meaning "joy, harmony". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
XOÁNmGalician
Galician form of JOHN.
XOCHIPILLImAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
XOELmGalician
Galician form of JOEL.
XOLANImSouthern African, Zulu
Means "peace" in Zulu.
XOSÉmGalician
Galician form of JOSEPH.
XQUENDAm & fNative American, Zapotec
Means "spirit, soul, essence" in Zapotec.
XUÂNm & fVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (xuân) meaning "spring (the season)".
XUANmAsturian
Asturian form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
XUEf & mChinese
From Chinese (xuě) meaning "snow" or (xué) meaning "study, learning, school", besides other characters pronounced similarly.
XULIOmGalician
Galician form of JULIUS.
XUNm & fChinese
From Chinese (xūn) meaning "meritorious deed, rank" or (xùn) meaning "snow", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
XURXOmGalician
Galician form of GEORGE.
XWMmHmong
Means "second son" in Hmong.
XYSTOSmLate Greek
Greek form of SIXTUS.
YADONmBiblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JADON.
YAFEm & fHebrew
Variant and masculine form of YAFFA.
YAFFEm & fHebrew
Variant transcription of YAFE.
YAĞMURf & mTurkish
Means "rain" in Turkish.
YAGOmSpanish
Spanish form of JACOB (or JAMES).
YAHUIf & mChinese
From Chinese () meaning "elegant, graceful, refined" combined with (huì) meaning "favour, benefit". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
YAHWEHmTheology
A name of the Hebrew God, represented in Hebrew by the tetragrammaton ("four letters") יהוה (Yod Heh Vav Heh), which was transliterated into Roman script as Y H W H. Because it was considered blasphemous to utter the name of God, it was only written and never spoken, which resulted in the original pronunciation becoming lost. The name may have originally been derived from the old Semitic root הוה (hawah) meaning "to be" or "to become".
YAHYAmArabic, Turkish, Persian
Arabic, Turkish and Persian form of Yochanan (see JOHN). This name honours John the Baptist, a prophet in Islam.
YAKIMmRussian
Russian form of JOACHIM.
YAKIVmUkrainian
Ukrainian form of JACOB (or JAMES).
YAKOVmHebrew, Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of JACOB (or JAMES), and a Hebrew variant transcription of YAAKOV.
YAKUBmArabic
Variant transcription of YAQUB.
YAKUPmTurkish
Turkish form of JACOB.
YALÇINmTurkish
Means "steep" in Turkish.
YALEmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was itself derived from a place name meaning "fertile upland" (from Welsh ial).
YAMmSemitic Mythology
Means "sea" in Ugaritic. Yam was the Ugaritic god of the sea, also associated with chaos, storms and destruction. He was a son of the chief god El.
YAMA (1)mHinduism
Means "twin" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu god of death. He is also regarded as the first mortal being, or in other words, the first person to die. This name is related to Persian Jam.
YAMA (2)mPashto
Pashto form of JAM.
YAMANUmEgyptian Mythology
Reconstructed Egyptian form of AMON.
YAMATOmJapanese
From YAMATO, an ancient name for Japan. It can also refer to the Yamato period in Japanese history, which lasted into the 8th century. The individual kanji are meaning "great" and meaning "harmony".
YAMIKANIm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "be grateful, praise" in Chewa.
YAMINmBiblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JAMIN.
YAN (1)mBelarusian
Belarusian variant of Ioannes (see JOHN).
YAN (2)f & mChinese
From Chinese (yàn) meaning "beautiful, gorgeous" (which is usually only feminine) or (yán) meaning "cliff, rocks", as well as other Chinese characters pronounced in a similar fashion.
YANCYmEnglish
From a surname, which was an Americanized form of the Dutch surname Jansen meaning "JAN (1)'s son".
YANGm & fChinese
From Chinese (yáng) meaning "ocean" or (yáng) meaning "light, sun, male" (which is typically only masculine), as well as other Chinese characters pronounced similarly.
YANICKm & fBreton, French
Masculine and feminine diminutive of YANN.
YANIVmHebrew
Means "he will prosper" in Hebrew.
YANKELmYiddish
Yiddish diminutive of JACOB.
YANKOmBulgarian
Diminutive of YOAN (2).
YANNmBreton, French
Breton form of JOHN.
YANNImGreek
Variant transcription of GIANNI.
YANNICm & fBreton, French
Masculine and feminine diminutive of YANN.
YANNICKm & fBreton, French
Masculine and feminine diminutive of YANN.
YANNISmGreek
Variant transcription of GIANNIS.
YAOmWestern African, Ewe
Means "born on Thursday" in Ewe.
YAQOOBmArabic
Variant transcription of YAQUB.
YAQUBmArabic
Arabic form of Ya'aqov (see JACOB).
YA'RAHmBiblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of JARAH.
YARDENm & fHebrew
Hebrew form of JORDAN.
YAREDmBiblical Hebrew, Eastern African, Ethiopian
Hebrew form of JARED. This form is also used in Ethiopia. It was borne by a semi-legendary 6th-century Ethiopian musician who is considered a saint in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church.
YARIKmRussian
Russian diminutive of YAROSLAV.
YAROGNEVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of JAROGNIEW.
YAROMILmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of JARMIL.
YAROMIRmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of JAROMÍR.
YARONmHebrew
Means "to sing, to shout" in Hebrew.
YAROPOLKmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of JAROPEŁK.
YAROSLAVmRussian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Russian and Ukrainian form of JAROSŁAW.
YAROSLAVAf & mRussian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Russian and Ukrainian feminine form of JAROSŁAW.
YAŞARmTurkish
Means "lives, inhabits" in Turkish.
YASENmBulgarian
Means both "ash tree" and "clear, serene" in Bulgarian.
YASERmPersian, Turkish, Arabic
Persian and Turkish form of YASIR, as well as a variant transcription of the Arabic name.
YASHmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Gujarati, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit यशस् (yashas) meaning "fame, praise, glory".
YASHAmRussian
Russian diminutive of YAKOV.
YASİNmTurkish
Turkish form of YASIN.
YASINmArabic, Persian, Urdu
From the Arabic letters ي (called ya) and س (called sin). These letters begin the 36th chapter of the Qur'an (surah Ya Sin).
YASIRmArabic, Urdu
Means "to be rich", derived from Arabic يسر (yasira) meaning "to become easy". This was the name of an early Islamic martyr. It was also borne by Yasir Arafat (1929-2004), a leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
YASSERmArabic, Persian
Variant transcription of YASIR.
YASUf & mJapanese
From Japanese (yasu) meaning "peace, quiet", (yasu) meaning "peaceful" or (yasu) meaning "flat, smooth, level", as well as other kanji which are pronounced the same way.