Names Categorized "white"

This is a list of names in which the categories include white.
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AERONWENfWelsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AFRA (2)fArabic
Means "whitish red" in Arabic.
AILBHEf & mIrish
Possibly derived from the old Gaelic root albho meaning "white". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint.
AIRIfJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
ÁKOSmHungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
ALBA (2)fAncient Roman
Feminine form of ALBUS.
ALBINOmItalian, Portuguese, Spanish
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of ALBINUS.
ALBUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
ALPINmScottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ailpein, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
ARJUNAmHinduism
Means "white, clear" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hero in Hindu texts, the son of the god Indra and the princess Kunti.
ARWYNmWelsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, fair".
AZUCENAfSpanish
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
BAIm & fChinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
BAILAfYiddish
Means "white" in Yiddish.
BARRFHIONNmIrish
Means "fair hair", derived from Gaelic barr "head" and fionn "white, fair".
BERMETfKyrgyz
Means "pearl" in Kyrgyz.
BIANCAfItalian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).
BISERAfBulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) "pearl" (ultimately of Arabic origin).
BISERKAfCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of BISERA.
BLANCAfSpanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan cognate of BLANCHE.
BLANCHEfFrench, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLODWENfWelsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BORA (2)fAlbanian
Derived from Albanian borë meaning "snow".
BORISmBulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRANWENfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
CAMELIAfRomanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CANDIDAfLate Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play 'Candida' (1898).
CAOILFHIONNfIrish
Derived from the Gaelic elements caol "slender" and fionn "fair". This was the name of several Irish saints.
CARWYNmWelsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
CELESTINEf & mEnglish
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CELINDAfEnglish (Rare)
Probably a blend of CELIA and LINDA. This is also the Spanish name for a variety of shrub with white flowers, known as sweet mock-orange in English (species Philadelphus coronarius).
CERIDWENfWelsh
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CHÂUf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (châu) meaning "pearl, gem".
DAFFODILfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAISYfEnglish
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DARf & mHebrew
Means "mother-of-pearl, nacre" in Hebrew.
ĐURĐICAfCroatian
Croatian feminine form of GEORGE. It also means "lily of the valley" in Croatian.
DURDONAfUzbek
Means "pearl" in Uzbek.
EDURmBasque
Means "snow" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Nieves.
EGLANTINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.
EIRA (1)fWelsh
Means "snow" in Welsh.
EIRLYSfWelsh
Means "snowdrop" in Welsh.
EIRWENfWelsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".
ELVA (1)fIrish
Anglicized form of AILBHE.
ENDZELAfGeorgian
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).
ERICAfEnglish, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERIKAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
FANNARmIcelandic
Possibly derived from Old Norse fönn meaning "snow drift".
FINGALmScottish
From Scottish Gaelic Fionnghall meaning "white stranger", derived from fionn "white, fair" and gall "stranger". This was the name of the hero in James Macpherson's epic poem 'Fingal' (1762), which he claimed to have based on early Gaelic legends about Fionn mac Cumhail.
FINNIANmIrish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
FINTANmIrish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONNmIrish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
FIONNBHARRmIrish
Means "fair hair", derived from Irish fionn "white, fair" and barr "head". Saint Fionnbharr of Cork was a 6th-century bishop who supposedly performed miraculous cures. The Barry Islands off Wales were named for him.
FIONNLAGHmIrish, Scottish
Means "white warrior" from Gaelic fionn "white, fair" and laogh "warrior".
FIONNUALAfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
FJOLLAfAlbanian
From Albanian fjollë meaning "fine snow".
FUNDAfTurkish
Means "heather" in Turkish.
FUYUKOfJapanese
From Japanese (fuyu) meaning "winter" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other combinations of kanji.
GARDENIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GOSIAfPolish
Diminutive of MAŁGORZATA.
GREETfDutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of MARGARET.
GREETJEfDutch
Dutch diminutive of MARGARET.
GRÉTAfHungarian, Icelandic
Short form of MARGARÉTA (Hungarian) or MARGRÉT (Icelandic).
GRETAfGerman, Italian, Lithuanian, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHENfGerman, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETEfGerman, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETELfGerman
Diminutive of GRETE. This name is well-known as the character in Grimm's fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch.
GRIETfDutch
Short form of MARGRIET.
GUINEVEREfArthurian Romance
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.... [more]
GWENfWelsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.
GWENAËLmFrench, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
GWENDAfWelsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 20th century.
GWENDOLENfWelsh
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
GWENLLIANfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and llian meaning "flaxen". This name was popular among medieval Welsh royalty. It was borne by the 14th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
GWYNEIRAfWelsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow".
GYÖNGYIfHungarian
From Hungarian gyöngy meaning "pearl", of Turkic origin.
HADLEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HANGAfHungarian
Means "heather" in Hungarian.
HAUKEAfHawaiian
Means "white snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and kea "white".
HAUNANIfHawaiian
Means "beautiful snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and nani "beauty, glory".
HEATHERfEnglish
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
HEDLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HELMIfFinnish, Swedish
Diminutive of VILHELMIINA or VILHELMINA. It also means "pearl" in Finnish.
HYEON-JUf & mKorean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" and (ju) meaning "jewel, pearl". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
HYUN-JOOf & mKorean
Variant transcription of HYEON-JU.
INZHUfKazakh
Means "pearl" in Kazakh.
IRITfHebrew
Means "asphodel" in Hebrew (an asphodel is a type of flower).
IVANČICAfCroatian
Means "daisy" in Croatian.
IVORYm & fAfrican American
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance which comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.
JASMIJNfDutch
Dutch form of JASMINE.
JASMIN (1)fGerman, Finnish, English
German and Finnish form of JASMINE, as well as an English variant.
JASMIN (2)mFrench (Rare)
French masculine form of JASMINE.
JASMINAfCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian, Slovene and Macedonian form of JASMINE.
JASMINEfEnglish, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JASMINKAfCroatian
Croatian diminutive of JASMINA.
JÁZMINfHungarian
Hungarian form of JASMINE.
JESSAMINEfEnglish (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JONAHmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
JUMANAfArabic
Means "pearl" in Arabic.
JUMANAHfArabic
Variant transcription of JUMANA.
KALINmBulgarian
Masculine form of KALINA.
KALINAfBulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.
KANIEHTIIOfNative American, Mohawk
Means "beautiful snow" in Mohawk.
KIELOfFinnish
Means "lily of the valley" in Finnish.
LABANmBiblical
Derived from Hebrew לָבָן (lavan) meaning "white". In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Rachel and Leah.
LEIMOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl lei" or "pearl child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and momi "pearl".
LILACfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILACHfHebrew
Means "lilac" in Hebrew.
LULITfEastern African, Amharic
Means "pearl" in Amharic.
LULU (2)fArabic
Means "pearl" in Arabic.
LUMIfFinnish
Means "snow" in Finnish.
MAARITfFinnish
Finnish form of MARGARET.
MADARAfLatvian
From the Latvian name for a type of flowering plant, known as cleavers or bedstraw in English.
MADELIEFfDutch
Derived from Dutch madeliefje meaning "daisy".
MADGEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAGGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAIGHREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MAIRÉADfIrish
Irish form of MARGARET.
MAIREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MAISIEfScottish
Diminutive of MAIREAD.
MALATIfIndian, Hindi
Means "jasmine" in Sanskrit.
MAŁGORZATAfPolish
Polish form of MARGARET.
MAMIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARY or MARGARET.
MANANAfGeorgian
Means "heather" in Georgian.
MAREDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MARETfEstonian
Estonian form of MARGARET.
MARGAIDfManx
Manx form of MARGARET.
MARGALITfHebrew
Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites).
MARGAREETAfFinnish (Rare)
Finnish variant form of MARGARET.
MARGARETfEnglish
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
MARGARÉTAfHungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARGARETEfGerman
German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHAfDutch, German
Dutch and German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHEfGerman, Danish
German and Danish form of MARGARET.
MARGARETTAfEnglish
Latinate form of MARGARET.
MARGARIDfArmenian
Variant transcription of MARGARIT.
MARGARIDAfPortuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan
Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of MARGARET. This is also the Portuguese and Galician word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGARITfArmenian
Armenian form of MARGARET, also meaning "pearl" in Armenian.
MARGARITAfSpanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Greek, Late Roman
Latinate form of MARGARET. This is also a Latin word meaning "pearl" and a Spanish word meaning "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGAUXfFrench
Variant of MARGOT influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
MARGEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGEDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MARGERYfEnglish
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARGHERITAfItalian
Italian form of MARGARET. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGITfHungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARGITAfSlovak
Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARGOTfFrench
French short form of MARGARET.
MARGREETfLimburgish, Dutch
Limburgish form of MARGARET and a Dutch variant of MARGRIET.
MARGRÉTfIcelandic
Icelandic form of MARGARET.
MARGRETEfNorwegian
Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARGRETHEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARGARET. This is the name of the current queen of Denmark (1940-).
MARGRIETfDutch
Dutch form of MARGARET. This is also the Dutch word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGRITfGerman
German variant form of MARGARET.
MARGUERITEfFrench
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARITfSwedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARITA (2)fSwedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARJETAfSlovene
Slovene form of MARGARET.
MARJORIEfEnglish
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MARKÉTAfCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARKETTAfFinnish
Finnish form of MARGARET.
MARSAILIfScottish
Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA.
MÄRTAfSwedish
Swedish short form of MARGARETA.
MARYAMfArabic, Persian
Arabic and Persian form of Miryam (see MARY). In Iran it is also the name of a flower, the tuberose, which is named after the Virgin Mary.
MARZENAfPolish
Probably originally a Polish diminutive of MARIA or MAŁGORZATA.
MAYfEnglish
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MAYMEfEnglish
Possibly a variant of MAMIE.
MEAGANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MEAGHANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MEGfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MEGANfWelsh, English
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEGGYfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MEGHANfEnglish
Variant of MEGAN.
MELATIfIndonesian, Malay
Means "jasmine flower" in Malay and Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit मालती (malati).
MERERIDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MERETEfDanish
Danish form of MARGARET.
METAfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of MARGARET.
METTEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish diminutive of MARGARET.
MOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl" in Hawaiian.
MORVARIDfPersian
Means "pearl" in Persian.
MÜGEfTurkish
Means "lily of the valley" in Turkish (species Convallaria majalis).
MYSIEfScottish
Variant of MAISIE.
NARCÍSmCatalan
Catalan form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Catalan word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of NARCISSUS. This is also the word for the narcissus flower in those languages.
NARCISSAfLate Roman
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NARCISSEm & fFrench
French masculine and feminine form of NARCISSUS. This is also the French word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISSUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Ναρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
NARCYZmPolish
Polish form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Polish word for the narcissus flower.
NARGESfPersian
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Persian, ultimately derived from Greek (see NARCISSUS).
NERGİSfTurkish
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Turkish, ultimately derived from Greek (see NARCISSUS).
NEVADAfEnglish
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
NIEVESfSpanish
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
PAAIEfManx
Manx form of PEGGY.
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLEfEnglish
Variant of PEARL.
PEARLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of PEARL.
PEGfEnglish
Short form of PEGGY.
PEGGIEfEnglish
Variant of PEGGY.
PEGGYfEnglish
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PEIGIfScottish
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PENINNAHfBiblical
Means "precious stone, pearl" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the wives of Elkanah, the other being Hannah.
PERELEfYiddish
Variant of PERLE.
PERLAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERLEfFrench, Yiddish
French and Yiddish cognate of PEARL. It is also used as a Yiddish vernacular form of Margaret.
PERLITAfItalian, Spanish
Diminutive of PERLA.
REETAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
REETTAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
RHONWENfWelsh
Means either "fair spear" or "fair hair" in Welsh. The first element is either rhon "spear" or rhawn "(coarse) hair", and the second element is gwen "fair, white, blessed".
RIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "reason, logic" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
RINA (4)fJapanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (na), a phonetic character, or (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
RIO (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
RITAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROSALBAfItalian
Italian name meaning "white rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and alba "white". A famous bearer was the Venetian painter Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757).
SADAFfArabic
Means "seashell, mother-of-pearl" in Arabic.
SEDEFfTurkish
Turkish form of SADAF.
SHINJUfJapanese
From Japanese 真珠 (shinju) meaning "pearl".
SHIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHIROU.
SHWETAfIndian, Marathi, Hindi, Gujarati
Means "white" in Sanskrit.
SMILTĖfLithuanian
Means "sandwort" in Lithuanian, referring to flowering plants from the genus Arenaria.
TRENDAFILKAfMacedonian
Derived from Macedonian трендафил (trendafil) meaning "eglantine, sweet briar".
TSUBAKIfJapanese
From Japanese 椿 (tsubaki) meaning "camellia flower", as well as other combinations of kanji which are pronounced the same way.
TUSHARmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati
Means "cold, frost, snow" in Sanskrit.
TUYẾTfVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (tuyết) meaning "snow".
WENDYfEnglish
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play 'Peter Pan' (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
WHITAKERmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
WHITNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WINTERfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
XUEf & mChinese
From Chinese (xuě) meaning "snow" or (xué) meaning "study, learning, school", besides other characters pronounced similarly.
XUNm & fChinese
From Chinese (xūn) meaning "meritorious deed, rank" or (xùn) meaning "snow", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
YASAMINfPersian
Variant transcription of YASMIN.
YASEMİNfTurkish
Turkish form of JASMINE.
YASMEENfPersian, Arabic
Variant transcription of YASMIN.
YASMINfPersian, Arabic, English (Modern)
From Persian یاسمن (yasamen) meaning "jasmine". In modern times it has been used in the English-speaking world, as a variant of JASMINE.
YASMINEfPersian, Arabic, English (Modern)
Variant transcription of YASMIN.
YUKIf & mJapanese
From Japanese (yuki) meaning "happiness" or (yuki) meaning "snow". It can also come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause" combined with (ki) meaning "valuable" or (ki) meaning "chronicle". Other kanji or kanji combinations are also possible.
YUKIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (yuki) meaning "happiness" or (yuki) meaning "snow" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Alternatively, it can come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause" with (ki) meaning "joy" or (ki) meaning "valuable" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
ZALmPersian Mythology
Means "albino" in Persian. In the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh' this is the name of a white-haired warrior.
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