Masculine Names

gender
usage
Bratislav m Serbian
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and slava "glory".
Bratomil m Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of Bratumił.
Bratoslav m Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of Bratislav.
Bratumił m Polish (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and milu "gracious, dear".
Braxton m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Bracca's town" in Old English. In some cases it is given in honour of the Confederate general Braxton Bragg (1817-1876).
Brayan m Spanish (Modern)
Spanish form of Brian.
Brayden m English (Modern)
Variant of Braden. This is currently the more popular spelling of the name.
Braylon m English (Modern)
An invented name, using the same sounds found in names such as Braden and Jalen.
Bréanainn m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Brendan.
Breandán m Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Brendan.
Brecht m Dutch
Short form of names containing brecht, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
Breixo m Galician
Galician form of Veríssimo.
Brendan m Irish, English, Breton
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Old Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from Old Welsh breenhin meaning "king, prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
Brendanus m Old Irish (Latinized)
Latinized form of Bréanainn (see Brendan).
Brenden m English
Variant of Brendan.
Brendon m English
Variant of Brendan.
Brennan m English
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Braonáin) that was derived from the byname Braonán, itself from Irish braon meaning "rain, moisture, drop" combined with a diminutive suffix. As a given name, it has been used since the 1960s as an alternative to Brendan or Brandon, though it has not been as popular as them.
Brennus m Gaulish (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
Breno m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Brennus.
Brent m English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
Brenton m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name meaning "Bryni's town". Bryni was Old English name meaning "fire".
Bret m English
Variant of Brett.
Břetislav m Czech
Possibly from Czech brečet "cry, weep" combined with the Slavic element slava "glory".
Brett m English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
Brian m English, Irish, Old Irish
Meaning uncertain, possibly related to the old Celtic root *brixs "hill, high" (Old Irish brií) or the related *brigā "might, power" (Old Irish briíg). It was borne by the Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. This name was common in Ireland after his time, and it was introduced to northern England by Norse-Gael settlers. It was also used in Brittany, and was brought to England by Bretons in the wake of the Norman Conquest. Though it eventually became rare in the English-speaking world, it was strongly revived in the 20th century, becoming a top-ten name for boys in most regions.
Briar m & f English (Modern)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
Brice m French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
Bricius m Gaulish (Latinized)
Latin form of Brice, probably ultimately of Gaulish origin.
Bridger m English (Modern)
From an English surname that originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.
Brigham m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "bridge settlement" in Old English.
Brijesha m Hinduism
Means "ruler of Brij" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, Brij being a region associated with him.
Brin m Slovene
Means "juniper" in Slovene.
Brion m English
Variant of Brian.
Briscoe m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
Britton m English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany). Both ethnonyms are related to the place name Britain.
Broccán m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Brogán.
Broccomaglos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Brochfael.
Brochfael m Medieval Welsh
From Old Welsh Brochmail, from a Brythonic name *Broccomaglos, derived from Celtic *brokkos "badger" and *maglos "chief". This was the name of a 6th-century king of Powys, also known as Brochwel.
Brochmail m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Brochfael.
Brock m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
Brody m English
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
Broen m Limburgish
Limburgish form of Bruno.
Brogán m Irish (Rare)
From the Old Irish name Broccán, derived from bróc "shoe, sandal, greave" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
Brokkr m Norse Mythology
Means "badger" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf, the brother and assistant of Sindri.
Bronislav m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of Bronisław.
Bronisław m Polish
Derived from the Slavic elements borna "protection" and slava "glory". A famous Polish anthropologist, Bronisław Malinowski (1884-1942), has borne this name.
Bronislovas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Bronisław.
Bronte m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh, itself derived from the given name Proinnteach, probably from Irish bronntach meaning "generous". The Brontë sisters — Charlotte, Emily, and Anne — were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
Brontes m Greek Mythology
Means "thunderer" in Greek. In Greek mythology (according to Hesiod), this was the name of one of the three Cyclopes, who were the sons of Uranus and Gaia.
Brook m & f English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
Brooklyn f & m English (Modern)
From the name of a borough of New York City, originally named after the Dutch town of Breukelen, itself meaning either "broken land" (from Dutch breuk) or "marsh land" (from Dutch broek). It can also be viewed as a combination of Brook and the popular name suffix lyn. It is considered a feminine name in the United States, but is more common as a masculine name in the United Kingdom.
Brooks m English
From an English surname, a variant of Brook.
Broos m Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of Ambroos.
Bror m Swedish
From the Old Norse name Bróðir meaning "brother".
Bróðir m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bror.
Bruce m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in the 1940s and 50s. Notable bearers include Chinese-American actor Bruce Lee (1940-1973), American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-), and American actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
Brunello m Italian
Diminutive of Bruno.
Bruno m German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition. A modern bearer is the American singer Bruno Mars (1985-), born Peter Gene Hernandez.
Brutus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "heavy" in Latin. Famous bearers include Lucius Junius Brutus, the traditional founder of the Roman Republic, and Marcus Junius Brutus, the statesman who conspired to assassinate Julius Caesar.
Bryan m English
Variant of Brian, based on the usual spelling of the surname that is derived from the name.
Bryant m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Brian.
Bryce m English
Variant of Brice.
Brychan m Old Welsh
Derived from Welsh brych meaning "speckled, freckled" combined with a diminutive suffix. Brychan Brycheiniog was a legendary Welsh king, said to be Irish by birth, the founder of the kingdom of Brycheiniog in central Wales. He reputedly fathered dozens of children, many of whom are regarded as saints.
Bryn m & f Welsh, English (Modern)
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. In Wales it is almost always a masculine name, though elsewhere in the English-speaking world it can be unisex (see Brynn).
Brynjar m Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements bryn "armour" and arr "warrior".
Brynjarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Brynjar.
Brynmor m Welsh
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Bryon m English
Variant of Brian.
Bryson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Brice". Starting in the 1970s this name began steadily growing in popularity, likely because it features the same popular sounds found in other names such as Brice and Tyson.
Buana m Indonesian
Means "the world" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit भुवन (bhuvana).
Buck m English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
Bud m English
Short form of Buddy.
Buddha m History
Means "enlightened" in Sanskrit. This is a title applied to Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, as well as to a handful of other enlightened individuals.
Buddy m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
Budi m Indonesian
Means "reason, mind, character" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit बुद्धि (buddhi) meaning "intellect" (related to Buddha).
Buenaventura m Spanish
Spanish form of Bonaventura.
Buğra m Turkish
Means "baby camel" in Turkish.
Buhle f & m Southern African, Xhosa, Ndebele
From Xhosa and Ndebele buhle "beautiful, handsome", from the root hle.
Búi m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bo 1.
Bulat m Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Болат (see Bolat).
Bülent m Turkish
From Persian بلند (boland) meaning "high, mighty".
Bulus m Arabic
Arabic form of Paul.
Bulut m Turkish
Means "cloud" in Turkish.
Bünyamin m Turkish
Turkish form of Benjamin.
Burak m Turkish
From Arabic براق (Buraq), the name of the legendary creature that, according to Islamic tradition, transported the Prophet Muhammad. Its name is derived from Arabic برق (barq) meaning "lightning".
Burçin f & m Turkish
Means "hind, doe" in Turkish.
Burhan m Arabic, Turkish, Indonesian
Means "proof" in Arabic.
Burhan ad-Din m Arabic
Means "proof of religion", derived from Arabic برهان (burhan) meaning "proof" and دين (din) meaning "religion, faith".
Burhan al-Din m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic برهان الدين (see Burhan ad-Din).
Burhanuddin m Arabic, Indonesian, Malay, Dari Persian
Alternate transcription of Arabic برهان الدين (see Burhan ad-Din), as well as the Indonesian, Malay and Dari Persian form.
Burim m Albanian
Means "spring, well, water source" in Albanian.
Burke m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
Burkhard m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
Burt m English
Short form of Burton.
Burton m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "fortified town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
Businge m & f Eastern African, Kiga
Means "peace" in Rukiga.
Buster m English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust, a dialectal variant of burst. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
Butrus m Arabic, Coptic
Arabic form of Peter.
Buz m Biblical
Means "contempt" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of Abraham's brother Nahor in the Old Testament.
Byelobog m Slavic Mythology
Means "the white god" from Slavic byelo "white" and bogu "god". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sun, happiness and fortune.
Byeong-Ho m Korean
From Sino-Korean (byeong) meaning "bright, luminous, glorious" combined with (ho) meaning "great, numerous, vast" or (ho) meaning "summer, sky, heaven". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Byrne m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Broin, which was derived from the given name Bran 1.
Byron m English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of Don Juan and many other works.
Bysshe m English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
Byung-Ho m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 병호 (see Byeong-Ho).
Cade m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
Cadell m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catell, derived from cat "battle" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of two early kings of Powys in Wales.
Caden m English (Modern)
Sometimes explained as deriving from the Irish surname Caden, which is an Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac Cadáin, itself from the given name Cadán (of unknown meaning). In actuality, the popularity of this name in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound — it shares its fashionable den suffix sound with other trendy names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
Cadeyrn m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catigirn meaning "battle king", derived from cat "battle" and tigirn "king, monarch". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
Cadfael m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catmail meaning "battle prince", from cat "battle" and mael "prince". This was apparently the birth name of Saint Cadoc. It was used by the British author Ellis Peters for the main character in her books The Cadfael Chronicles, first released in 1977.
Cadfan m Old Welsh
From an Old Welsh name, recorded in Latinized forms such as Catamanus, meaning "battle peak" from cat "battle" and bann "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
Cadmus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κάδμος (Kadmos), of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology Cadmus was the son of the Phoenician king Agenor. He was sent by his father to rescue his sister Europa, who had been abducted by Zeus, although he did not succeed in retrieving her. According to legend, Cadmus founded the city of Thebes and introduced the alphabet to Greece.
Cadoc m Old Welsh
From an Old Welsh name, recorded in Latinized forms such as Catocus, derived from cat meaning "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
Cadogan m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cadwgan.
Cadwalader m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cadwaladr.
Cadwaladr m Welsh
From Old Welsh Catgualatr (also recorded in many other spellings) meaning "leader of the battle", from cat "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a 7th-century king of Gwynedd. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth he was the last king of all of the Britons. This name was also borne by a 7th-century Welsh saint.
Cadwgan m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catguocaun (and many other spellings) meaning "glory in battle", from cat "battle" and guocaun "glory, honour". It appears briefly in the medieval Welsh tale The Dream of Rhonabwy.
Caecilius m Ancient Roman
Original Latin masculine form of Cecilia.
Caedmon m History (Ecclesiastical)
Meaning unknown, though the first element is likely connected to Brythonic kad meaning "battle". Saint Caedmon was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poet who supposedly received his poetic inspiration from a dream. Our only knowledge of him is through the 8th-century writings of the historian Bede.
Cáel m Irish Mythology
From Old Irish cáel meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
Caelan m & f English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caolán or Caoilfhionn.
Caelestinus m Late Roman
Late Latin name, a derivative of Caelestis. This name was borne by five popes (usually spelled Celestine in English).
Caelestis m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "of the sky, heavenly".
Caelinus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was itself derived from the Roman family name Caelius.
Caelius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from Latin caelum meaning "heaven".
Caerwyn m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
Caesar m Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen that possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
Caesarius m Late Roman
Late Latin name that was derived from Caesar. Saint Caesarius was a 6th-century bishop of Arles.
Caeso m Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from Latin caesius meaning "blue-grey". This praenomen was only used by a few families.
Caesonius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from the praenomen Caeso.
Caetano m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Caietanus (see Gaetano).
Cəfər m Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Jafar.
Cafer m Turkish
Turkish form of Jafar.
Çağatay m Turkish
From the Mongolian name Tsagadai (of unknown meaning), which was borne by the second son of Genghis Khan, known as Chagatai in English.
Çağrı m & f Turkish
Means "invitation" or "falcon" in Turkish.
Cahal m Irish
Anglicized form of Cathal.
Cahaya m & f Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
Cahir m Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Cathaoir, possibly meaning "battle man" from Old Irish cath "battle" and fer "man".
Cahya m & f Indonesian
Variant of Cahaya.
Cahyo m & f Javanese
Javanese form of Cahaya.
Caiaphas m Biblical
Meaning unknown, probably of Aramaic origin. In the New Testament this is the name of the Jewish high priest who condemns Jesus.
Caietanus m Late Roman
Latin form of Gaetano.
Cailean m Scottish Gaelic
Means "whelp, young dog" in Scottish Gaelic. This name was borne by Cailean Mór, a 13th-century Scottish lord and ancestor of Clan Campbell.
Cain m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
Caíndelbán m Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish caín "handsome" and delb "form, image" (with a diminutive suffix).
Cainnech m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Coinneach.
Caio m Portuguese, Italian (Rare)
Portuguese and Italian form of Gaius.
Cairbre m Irish
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
Cairo m English (Modern)
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
Caishen m Chinese Mythology
Means "god of wealth", from Chinese (cái) meaning "wealth, riches" and (shén) meaning "god". This is the name of a Chinese god of wealth.
Caiside m Medieval Irish
Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish cas "twisted, curly".
Caius m Ancient Roman
Roman variant of Gaius.
Caj m Swedish (Rare)
Variant of Kai 1.
Cal m English
Short form of Calvin and other names beginning with Cal.
Calbhach m Medieval Irish
Means "bald" in Irish.
Cale m English
Short form of Caleb.
Caleb m English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
Caligula m History
Means "little boot" in Latin. This was a nickname for the 1st-century Roman emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus given to him in his youth by his father's soldiers.
Calisto m Portuguese (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Portuguese and Spanish form of Callistus.
Calixte m French
French form of Calixtus.
Calixto m Spanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Calixtus.
Calixtus m Late Roman
Variant of Callistus, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
Callahan m English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Ceallacháin, itself from the given name Cellachán.
Callan m English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Cathaláin, derived from the given name Cathalán.
Callisto 1 m Italian
Italian form of Callistus.
Callistus m Late Roman
Late Latin name that was derived from the Greek name Κάλλιστος (Kallistos) meaning "most beautiful". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callixtus), including the 3rd-century Callistus I who is regarded as a saint.
Callixtus m Late Roman
Variant of Callistus, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
Callum m Scottish
Variant of Calum.
Calogero m Italian
From the Late Latin name Calogerus meaning "beautiful elder", from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and γέρων (geron) meaning "old man, elder". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a hermit of Sicily.
Calogerus m Late Roman
Latin form of Calogero.
Calpurnius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name, which was possibly derived from Latin calpar meaning "chalice, cup".
Calum m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Columba.
Calvin m English
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.... [more]
Calvus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "bald" in Latin.
Cam 1 f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
Cam 2 m & f English
Short form of Cameron.
Cambyses m History
From Καμβύσης (Kambyses), the Greek form of the Old Persian name Kambujiya, which is of unknown meaning. Two Persian kings bore this name, including Cambyses II who conquered Egypt.
Camden m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
Cameron m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose". As a given name it is mainly used for boys. It got a little bump in popularity for girls in the second half of the 1990s, likely because of the fame of actress Cameron Diaz (1972-). In the United States, the forms Camryn and Kamryn are now more popular than Cameron for girls.
Camille f & m French, English
French feminine and masculine form of Camilla. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
Camillo m Italian
Italian form of Camillus.
Camillus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.
Camilo m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Camillus.
Campbell m & f English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and beul "mouth".
Camryn f & m English (Modern)
Variant (typically feminine) of Cameron.
Can m Turkish
Means "soul, life" or by extension "darling, sweetheart" in Turkish, from Persian جان (jan).
Canaan m Biblical
Meaning unknown. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor of the Canaanite people.
Cande f & m Spanish
Short form of Candelaria or Candelario.
Candelario m Spanish
Masculine form of Candelaria.
Candide m & f French (Rare), Literature
French form of Candidus or Candida. The French philosopher and author Voltaire used this name for the main character (a male) in his satire Candide (1759). In French candide also means "naive", which is descriptive of the book's protagonist.
Cándido m Spanish
Spanish form of Candidus.
Cândido m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Candidus.
Candido m Italian
Italian form of Candidus.
Candidus m Late Roman
Masculine form of Candida. This name was borne by a few early saints and martyrs.
Caner m Turkish
From Turkish can meaning "soul, life" and er meaning "brave man".
Canute m History
Anglicized form of Knut.
Caoimhín m Irish
Irish form of Kevin.
Caolán m Irish
From Irish caol meaning "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
Caomh m Irish (Rare)
Means "dear, beloved, gentle" in Irish.
Caomhán m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Cóemán, derived from cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early Irish saints.
Caracalla m Ancient Roman
From Latin caracalla, which referred to a type of hooded tunic worn by the Gauls. This was the agnomen, or nickname, of a 3rd-century Roman emperor.
Caradog m Welsh, Arthurian Romance
From the Old Welsh name Caratauc, a Welsh form of Caratācos. This is the name of several figures in Welsh history and legend, including an 8th-century king of Gwynedd, a 12th-century saint, and a son of Brân the Blessed. In Arthurian romance Caradog is a Knight of the Round Table. He first appears in Welsh poems, with his story expanded by French authors such as Chrétien de Troyes.
Caratācos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Caratacus.
Caratacus m Brythonic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Brythonic name *Caratācos meaning "loved", derived from the old Celtic root *karu "to love". According to Roman writers, this was the name of a 1st-century British chieftain who rebelled against Roman rule.
Caratauc m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Caradog.
Carbrey m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cairbre.
Carbry m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cairbre.
Carel m Dutch
Dutch form of Charles.
Carey m & f English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Ciardha, which is a patronymic derived from the given name Ciardha.
Carl m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of Charles. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
Carles m Catalan
Catalan form of Charles.
Carlinhos m Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Carlos.
Carlisle m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of Lugus". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
Carlman m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of Carloman.
Carlo m Italian
Italian form of Charles.
Carloman m History, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name derived from karl (see Charles) and man "man". This was the name of several Frankish rulers, including the 8th-century Carloman I who ruled jointly with his brother Charlemagne for a time.
Carlos m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Charles.
Carlton m English
Variant of Charlton.
Carlu m Corsican
Corsican form of Charles.
Carlyle m English
Variant of Carlisle.
Carmelo m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of Carmel.
Carmi m Biblical
Means "vine" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Reuben in the Old Testament.
Carmine m Italian
Italian masculine form of Carmen.
Carmo m & f Portuguese
Portuguese form of Carmel.
Carol 1 f & m English
Short form of Caroline. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from Carolus. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
Carol 2 m Romanian
Romanian form of Carolus. This was the name of two Romanian kings.
Caron f & m Welsh
From the name of places near the town of Tregaron in Ceredigion, Wales.
Carpus m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latin form of the Greek name Καρπός (Karpos), which meant "fruit, profits". The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament in the second epistle of Timothy.
Carrol m & f English
Variant of Carroll (masculine) or Carol 1 (feminine).
Carroll m Irish
Anglicized form of Cearbhall. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Carson m & f English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
Carter m English
From an English surname that meant "one who uses a cart". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Jimmy Carter (1924-).
Carthach m Old Irish
Means "loving" in Irish. This was the name of two Irish saints, from the 6th and 7th centuries.
Carver m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "wood carver".
Carwyn m Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "to love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This name was created in the 20th century.
Cary m & f English
Variant of Carey. A famous bearer was the British-American actor Cary Grant (1904-1986).
Cas m Dutch
Short form of Casper.
Case m English (Modern)
Short form of Casey.
Casey m & f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh, a patronymic derived from the given name Cathassach. This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
Cash m English
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
Casimir m English, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
Casimiro m Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Casimir.
Cason m English (Modern)
An invented name, based on the sound of names such as Mason and Jason. It also coincides with the English surname Cason.
Casper m Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian form of Jasper. This is the name of a friendly ghost in an American series of cartoons and comic books (beginning 1945).
Caspian m Literature
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
Cass f & m English
Short form of Cassandra, Cassidy and other names beginning with Cass.
Cassander m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κάσσανδρος (Kassandros), the masculine form of Cassandra. This was the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Macedon.
Cassian m Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from Cassius. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
Cassianus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was a derivative of Cassius.
Cassidy f & m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Caiside), which is derived from the byname Caiside. Very rare as a given name before the 1970s, it established itself in the 80s and then surged in popularity during the 90s.
Cassiel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Hebrew קַפצִיאֵל (Qaftzi'el), of uncertain meaning. Suggested meanings include "speed of God" or "cover of God". This is the name of an angel in medieval Jewish, Christian and Islamic mysticism.
Cassius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
Castiel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend, Popular Culture
Possibly a variant of Cassiel. It is the name of an angel in the grimoire the Heptameron, a work that is sometimes (probably incorrectly) attributed to the 13th-century philosopher Pietro d'Abano. It is also the name of a character (an angel) on the American television series Supernatural (2005-2020). The creator Eric Kripke chose it after an internet search revealed that Castiel was an angel associated with Thursdays, the day the show aired.
Castor m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κάστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κέκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κέκαστο). Alternatively it could be derived from the Greek word κάστωρ (kastor) meaning "beaver", though the legends about Castor do not mention beavers, which were foreign animals to the Greeks. In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
Cat f & m English
Diminutive of Catherine. It can also be a nickname from the English word for the animal.
Catahecassa m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee warrior and chief.
Cătălin m Romanian
Romanian masculine form of Katherine.
Catell m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Cadell.
Catello m Italian
Italian form of Catellus.
Catellus m Late Roman
Probably from Latin catulus meaning "young dog, puppy". Saint Catellus was a 9th-century bishop of Castellammare, Italy.
Catguocaun m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Cadwgan.
Cathair m Irish
Variant of Cathaoir.
Cathal m Irish, Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish cath "battle" and fal "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It was also borne by several Irish kings. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
Cathalán m Old Irish
Diminutive of Cathal.
Cathán m Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Cathán was a 6th-century Irish monk, a missionary to the Isle of Bute.
Cathaoir m Irish (Rare)
Irish Gaelic form of Cahir.
Cathassach m Old Irish
Means "vigilant" in Irish.
Cato 1 m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.
Cauã m Indigenous American, Tupi
From Tupi kaûã meaning "hawk, falcon".