Masculine Names

gender
usage
GUÐMUNDUR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of GUDMUND.
GUÐNI m Icelandic
Icelandic form of GUÐINI.
GUTO m Welsh
Diminutive of GRUFFUDD.
GUUS m Dutch
Dutch short form of AUGUSTUS or GUSTAAF.
GÜVENÇ m Turkish
Means "trust" in Turkish.
GUY (1) m English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels Guy Mannering (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and The Heir of Redclyffe (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
GUY (2) m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew גַּיְא (see GAI). This is the more common transcription.
GVIDAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of GUIDO.
GWALCHMEI m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with mei "May (the month)". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend. He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from Arthurian romance.
GWALLTER m Welsh
Welsh form of WALTER.
GWANDOYA m Eastern African, Ganda
Means "met with misery" in Luganda.
GWENAËL m French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
GWENDAL m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and tal meaning "brow, forehead".
GWENNEG m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Gwenneg was an 8th-century monk of Brittany.
GWIL m Welsh
Welsh short form of GWILYM.
GWILHERM m Breton
Breton form of WILLIAM.
GWILIM m Welsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWILLYM m Welsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWILYM m Welsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWRTHEYRN m Ancient Welsh
Means "supreme king" from Welsh gor meaning "over" and teyrn meaning "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. According to medieval chroniclers, Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited the brothers Hengist and Horsa to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
GWYDION m Welsh Mythology
Means "born of trees" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, Gwydion was the nephew of Math, and like him a powerful magician. He was the uncle of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, for whom he fashioned a wife, Blodeuwedd, out of flowers.
GWYN m Welsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
GWYNEDD f & m Welsh
From the name of a region in Wales, named after an ancient kingdom, which may be derived from the old Welsh given name Cunedda.
GWYNFOR m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with mawr meaning "great, large".
GWYNN m Welsh
Variant of GWYN.
GWYTHYR m Welsh
Welsh form of VICTOR.
GYATSO m Tibetan
From Tibetan རྒྱ་མཚོ (rgya-mtsho) meaning "ocean". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
GYEONG m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city", (gyeong) meaning "scenery, view", (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour", or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
GYÖRGY m Hungarian
Hungarian form of GEORGE.
GYŐZŐ m Hungarian
Means "victor" in Hungarian.
GYULA m Hungarian
From a Hungarian royal title, which was probably of Turkic origin. This name is also used as a Hungarian form of JULIUS.
GYURI m Hungarian
Diminutive of GYÖRGY.
HAAKON m Norwegian
Variant of HÅKON.
HAAMID m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حامد (see HAMID (2)).
HABACUC m Biblical Latin
Latin form of HABAKKUK used in some versions of the Vulgate.
HABAKKUK m Biblical
From the Hebrew name חֲבַקּוּק (Chavaqquq), perhaps meaning "embrace" from the root חָבַק (chavaq). In the Old Testament this is one of the twelve minor prophets, the author of the Book of Habakkuk.
HABIB m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "beloved, darling" in Arabic.
HABIBULLAH m Arabic
Means "friend of ALLAH", from Arabic حبيب (habib) meaning "friend" combined with الله (Allah).
HACHIRO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 八郎 (see HACHIRŌ).
HACHIRŌ m Japanese
From Japanese (hachi) meaning "eight" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the eighth son. Other kanji combinations are also possible.
HACHIROU m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 八郎 (see HACHIRŌ).
HACÎ m Kurdish
Kurdish form of HAJI.
HACI m Turkish
Turkish form of HAJI.
HADAD m Semitic Mythology
Derived from a Semitic root meaning "thunder". Hadad was a Western Semitic (Levantine) god of thunder and storms, often called Ba'al. He was imported to Mesopotamia by the Amorites, where he was known as Adad to the Assyrians and Babylonians.
HADAR f & m Hebrew
Means "splendour, glory" in Hebrew.
HADES m Greek Mythology
From Greek Ἅιδης (Haides), derived from ἀϊδής (aides) meaning "unseen". In Greek mythology Hades was the dark god of the underworld, a place that was also called Hades. His brother was Zeus and his wife was Persephone.
HADI m Arabic, Persian
Means "leader, guide" in Arabic.
HADİ m Turkish
Turkish form of HADI.
HADLEY f & m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HADRIAN m History
From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was the name of two Roman settlements. The first (modern Adria) is in northern Italy and was an important Etruscan port town. The second (modern Atri) is in central Italy and was named after the northern town. The Adriatic Sea is also named after the northern town.... [more]
HADRIANUS m Ancient Roman
Original Roman form of HADRIAN.
HADRIEN m French
French variant form of ADRIAN.
HADUBERT m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu "battle" and beraht "bright".
HADUFUNS m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and funs "ready".
HADYN m & f English (Rare)
Variant of HAYDEN.
HAERVIU m Medieval Breton
Breton form of HARVEY.
HAFEEZ m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حفيظ (see HAFIZ).
HAFIZ m Arabic
Means "custodian, guardian" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الحفيظ (al-Hafiz) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
HAGEN (1) m German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HAGEN (2) m Danish
Danish form of HÅKON.
HAGGAI m Biblical
Means "festive" in Hebrew, from the root חָגַג (chagag). This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He was the author of the Book of Haggai, which urges the exiles returning from Babylonia to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem.
HAGOP m Armenian
Western Armenian transcription of HAKOB.
HẢI m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hải) meaning "sea, ocean".
HAI m & f Chinese
From Chinese (hǎi) meaning "sea, ocean" or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
HAIDAR m Arabic
Means "lion, warrior" in Arabic. This is a title of Ali, the husband of Fatimah the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.
HAIDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
HAIDES m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HADES. After the classical period, the ι in the sequence αι (often written as a subscript like ) was not pronounced.
HAIG m Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Հայկ (see HAYK).
HAIK m Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Հայկ (see HAYK).
HAIM m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAIM). This seems to be the most common transcription for Israeli Jews.
HAIMO m Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element heim meaning "home".
HAJI m Arabic
Refers to a person who has participated in the حَجّ (hajj), the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia that Muslims must undertake at least once in their lifetimes.
HA-JUN m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ha) meaning "summer, great, grand" combined with (jun) meaning "approve, permit". This name can be formed by other hanja characters as well.
HÅKAN m Swedish
Swedish form of Hákon (see HÅKON).
HAKAN m Turkish
Means "emperor, ruler" in Turkish.
HAKEEM m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حكيم (see HAKIM). A famous bearer is Nigerian-born former basketball player Hakeem Olajuwon (1963-).
HAKIM m Arabic
Means "wise" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الحكيم (al-Hakim) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
HAKOB m Armenian
Armenian form of JACOB (or JAMES).
HÁKON m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of HÅKON, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
HÅKON m Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Hákon, which meant "high son" from "high" and konr "son, descendant". This was the name of seven kings of Norway.
HAL m English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HALDOR m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallþórr, which meant "Thor's rock" from hallr "rock" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
HALE (2) m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HÁLFDAN m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of HALFDAN.
HALFDAN m Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hálfdan meaning "half Danish", composed of the elements hálfr "half" and Danr "Dane", originally a nickname for a person who was half Danish.
HALİL m Turkish
Turkish form of KHALIL.
HALIL m Albanian
Albanian form of KHALIL.
HALİM m Turkish
Turkish form of HALIM.
HALIM m Arabic
Means "patient, tolerant, mild" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الحليم (al-Halim) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
HALİT m Turkish
Turkish form of KHALID.
HALL m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English heall "manor, hall", originally belonging to a person who lived or worked in a manor.
HALLAM m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning either "at the rocks" or "at the nook" in Old English.
HALLBJÖRN m Icelandic
Icelandic form of HALLBJǪRN.
HALLBJǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements hallr "rock" and bjǫrn "bear".
HALLDÓR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of HALDOR.
HALLDOR m Norwegian
Variant of HALDOR.
HALLE (1) m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Halli, a diminutive of names containing the element hallr meaning "rock".
HALLR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse hallr meaning "rock".
HALSTEIN m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallsteinn, derived from the elements hallr "rock" and steinn "stone".
HALSTEN m Swedish
Old Swedish form of Hallsteinn (see HALSTEIN).
HALUK m Turkish
Means "good nature" in Turkish.
HALVAR m Swedish
Swedish form of HALVARD.
HALVARD m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallvarðr, which meant "rock guardian" from hallr "rock" combined with varðr "guardian".
HALVOR m Norwegian
Variant of HALVARD.
HAM m Biblical
Means "hot, warm" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Ham is one of Noah's three sons, along with Shem and Japheth. He was the ancestor of the Egyptians and Canaanites.
HAMA m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
From Old English ham meaning "home". This is the name of a Gothic warrior who appears with his companion of Wudga in some Anglo-Saxon tales (briefly in Beowulf).
HAMAN m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Meaning uncertain, of Persian origin. In the Book of Esther in the Old Testament Haman, called the Agagite, is an adviser to the Persian king. He plots to have all the Jews in the realm executed, but is foiled by Queen Esther.
HAMED m Arabic, Persian
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Persian حامد (see HAMID (2)).
HAMEED m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic حميد or Urdu حمید (see HAMID (1)).
HAMID (1) m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "praiseworthy" in Arabic, from the root حَمِدَ (hamida) meaning "to praise". In Islamic tradition الحميد (al-Hamid) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
HAMID (2) m Arabic, Persian
Means "praiser" in Arabic.
HAMILCAR m Phoenician (Latinized), History
Means "brother of Melqart" from Phoenician ha "brother" combined with the name of the god MELQART. Hamilcar was a 3rd-century BC Carthaginian general, the father of Hannibal.
HAMILTON m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". The surname was originally taken from the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists). A famous bearer of the surname was Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), a founding father of the United States who was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr.
HAMISH m Scottish
Anglicized form of a Sheumais, the vocative case of SEUMAS.
HAMİT m Turkish
Turkish form of HAMID (1).
HAMLET m Literature, Armenian
Anglicized form of the Danish name Amleth. Shakespeare used this name for the Prince of Denmark in his play Hamlet (1600), which he based upon earlier Danish tales.
HAMMOND m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from either the Germanic given name Haimund, which meant "home protection", or else the Old Norse given name Hámundr, which meant "high protection".
HAMMURABI m Babylonian (Anglicized), History
From Akkadian Hammu-rapi, probably derived from Amorite, another Semitic language. Various meanings, such as "uncle is a healer", have been suggested.... [more]
HAMMU-RAPI m Babylonian
Akkadian form of HAMMURABI.
HAMNET m English (Archaic)
Diminutive of HAMO. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play Hamlet.
HAMO m Medieval English
Norman form of HAIMO. The Normans brought this name to Britain.
HAMPUS m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of HANS.
HAMZA m Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian
Possibly derived from Arabic hamuza meaning "strong, steadfast". This was the name of the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad who was killed in battle.
HANAN (1) m Biblical
Means "gracious" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament.
HANANIAH m Biblical
Means "YAHWEH is gracious" in Hebrew. This name appears frequently in the Old Testament. It is the Hebrew name of Shadrach.
HANEEF m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic حنيف or Urdu حنیف (see HANIF).
HANEUL m & f Korean
Means "heaven, sky" in Korean.
HANI m Arabic
Means "happy" in Arabic.
HANIF m Arabic, Urdu
Means "true, upright" in Arabic.
HANK m English
Originally a short form of Hankin, which was a medieval diminutive of JOHN. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of HENRY, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive HENK. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-).
HANKE m Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JOHAN.
HANKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of HANN.
HANN m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
HANNAS m Biblical Greek
Greek form of ANNAS.
HANNE (1) f & m Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNIBAL m Phoenician (Latinized), History
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HANNU m Finnish
Finnish diminutive of JOHANNES.
HANS m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German short form of JOHANNES, now used independently. This name has been very common in German-speaking areas of Europe since the late Middle Ages. From an early period it was transmitted to the Low Countries and Scandinavia. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a German portrait painter, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HANS-GÜNTER m German
Combination of HANS and GÜNTER.
HANS-GÜNTHER m German
Combination of HANS and GÜNTHER.
HANSJÖRG m German
Combination of HANS and JÖRG.
HANS-JÜRGEN m German
Combination of HANS and JÜRGEN.
HANS-PETER m German
Combination of HANS and PETER.
HANSPETER m German
Combination of HANS and PETER.
HANUŠ m Czech
Czech form of HANNES.
HANZŌ m Japanese
From Japanese (han) meaning "half" and () meaning "to hide". This name was borne by the noted samurai Hattori Hanzou (1542-1596). The name can also be formed from other kanji combinations.
HANZOU m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 半蔵 (see HANZŌ).
HÀO m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hào) meaning "brave, heroic".
HAPI m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of APIS.
HAPPY f & m English (Rare)
From the English word happy, derived from Middle English hap "chance, luck", of Old Norse origin.
HARALAMB m Romanian
Romanian form of CHARALAMPOS.
HARALAMBI m Bulgarian
Bulgarian variant of CHARALAMPOS.
HARALAMPI m Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of CHARALAMPOS.
HARALD m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HARALDR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of HAROLD.
HARALDUR m Icelandic
Icelandic cognate of HAROLD.
HARAN m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "hill, mountain" in Hebrew. This is the name of the brother of Abraham and father of Lot in the Old Testament.
HARDEEP m Indian (Sikh)
From the name of the Hindu god HARI and Sanskrit दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
HARDING m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name HEARD. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDMAN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTMANN.
HARDMOD m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTMUT.
HARDUWICH m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTWIG.
HARDWIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTWIN.
HARDY m English
From a surname that was derived from Middle English hardi "bold, hardy".
HAREL m Hebrew
Means "altar, mountain of God" in Hebrew. In the Hebrew Bible this word is applied to the altar in the temple in Jerusalem (Ezekiel 43:15).
HARENDRA m Indian, Hindi
Combination of the names of the Hindu gods HARI (referring to Vishnu) and INDRA.
HARI m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HARIBERT m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HERBERT.
HARIMAN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HERMAN.
HARINDER m & f Indian (Sikh)
Variant of HARENDRA used by Sikhs.
HARIS (1) m Bosnian, Urdu, Arabic
Bosnian and Urdu form of HARITH, as well as an alternate transcription of the Arabic name.
HARIS (2) m & f Greek
Modern Greek form of CHARES or CHARIS.
HARISHA m Hinduism
Means "lord of monkeys" from Sanskrit हरि (hari) meaning "monkey" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
HARITH m Arabic
Means "plowman, cultivator" in Arabic.
HARIWALD m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
HARIWINI m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERWIN.
HARKAITZ m Basque
Variant of ARKAITZ.
HARLAN m English
From a surname that was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLAND m English
From a surname that was a variant of HARLAN.
HARLEY m & f English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW f & m English
From a surname derived from a place name, itself derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARM m Dutch
Dutch short form of HERMAN.
HARMON m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name HERMAN.
HAROLD m English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman Conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HAROLDO m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HAROLD.
HAROON m Urdu
Urdu form of HARUN.
HAROUN m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هارون (see HARUN).
HAROUNA m Western African
Form of HARUN used in parts of western Africa.
HARPER f & m English
From an Old English surname that originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird.
HARPREET m & f Indian (Sikh)
From the name of the Hindu god HARI and Sanskrit प्रीति (priti) meaning "pleasure, joy, love".
HARRI m Finnish, Welsh
Finnish and Welsh form of HARRY.
HARRIS m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON m English
From an English surname that meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). The actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as Star Wars and Indiana Jones, is a famous bearer.
HARRY m English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HARSH m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Northern Indian form of HARSHA.
HARSHA m Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Sanskrit
Means "happiness" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 7th-century emperor of northern India. He was also noted as an author.
HARSHAD m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit हर्ष (harsha) meaning "happiness".
HARSHAL m Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Derived from Sanskrit हर्ष (harsha) meaning "happiness".
HARTA m Indonesian
Means "wealth, treasure, property" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit अर्थ (artha).
HARTLEY m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HARTMANN m German (Rare)
Means "brave man", derived from the Germanic element hard "brave, hardy" combined with man.
HARTMUT m German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and muot "mind, spirit".
HARTWIG m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARTWIN m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HARUKA f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
HARUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HARUN m Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian
Arabic form of AARON. Harun al-Rashid was a 9th-century Abbasid caliph featured in the stories of The 1001 Nights.
HARUT m Armenian
Short form of HARUTYUN.
HARUTO m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HARUTYUN m Armenian
Means "resurrection" in Armenian.
HARVE m English
Short form of HARVEY.
HARVEY m English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HARVIE m English
Variant of HARVEY.
HƏSƏN m Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of HASAN.
HASAN m Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian
Means "handsome" in Arabic, from the root حَسُنَ (hasuna) meaning "to be beautiful, to be good". Hasan was the son of Ali and the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. He was poisoned by one of his wives and is regarded as a martyr by Shia Muslims. This was also the name of two kings of Morocco. It is sometimes transcribed as Hassan, though this is a distinct name in Arabic.
HASDRUBAL m Phoenician (Latinized), History
Means "Ba'al helps" from Phoenician azru "help" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hasdrubal was a Carthaginian general, the brother of Hannibal.
HASEEB m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic حسيب or Urdu حسیب (see HASIB).
HASHEM m Persian
Persian form of HASHIM.
HASHIM m Arabic, Urdu, Malay
Means "crusher, breaker" in Arabic. This was the nickname of a great-grandfather of the Prophet Muhammad. He acquired this nickname because of his practice of crumbling bread and giving it to pilgrims.
HASIB m Arabic, Urdu
Means "noble, respected" in Arabic.
HAŞİM m Turkish
Turkish form of HASHIM.
HASIM m Arabic
Means "decisive" in Arabic, derived from حسم (hasama) meaning "to sever, to finish, to decide".
HASİP m Turkish
Turkish form of HASIB.
HASKEL m Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish variant of EZEKIEL.
HASSAN m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "beautifier, improver" in Arabic. Hassan ibn Thabit was a 7th-century poet who was a companion of the Prophet Muhammad. This name is sometimes transcribed as Hasan, though the two names are spelled distinctly in Arabic.
HASSE m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of HANS.
HASSO m German
German diminutive of HADUBERT.
HATIM m Arabic
Means "determined, decisive" in Arabic.
HAUKE m Frisian, German
Frisian short form of Germanic given names containing the element hug meaning "heart, mind, spirit".
HAUL m Welsh
Means "sun" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
HÅVARD m Norwegian
Norwegian form of HÁVARÐR.
HÁVARÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
From the Old Norse elements "high" and varðr "guardian, defender".
HAVEL m Czech (Rare), Slovak (Rare)
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HAVEN f & m English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAVILAH m Biblical
Probably means "to dance, to circle, to twist" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is both a place name and a masculine personal name.
HAVRYIL m Ukrainian (Rare)
Ukrainian form of GABRIEL.
HAYAT f & m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "life" in Arabic, from حيي (hayiya) meaning "to live". In Arabic and Persian it is a feminine name, while in Urdu it is masculine.
HAYATE m Japanese
From Japanese (hayate) meaning "sudden, sound of the wind". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
HAYATİ m Turkish
Means "vital" in Turkish.
HAYATO m Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HAYDAR m Turkish
Turkish form of HAIDAR.
HAYDEN m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
HAYDN m English (British)
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYES m English
From a surname, either HAYES (1) or HAYES (2). It was borne by American president Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
HAYIM m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAIM).
HAYK m Armenian
Probably from the Armenian word հայ (hay) meaning "Armenian", although some hold that the ethnic name is in fact derived from the given name. This was the name of the legendary forefather of the Armenian people, supposedly a great-great-grandson of Noah.
HAYRİ m Turkish
Means "useful man" in Turkish.
HAYTHAM m Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
HAYWOOD m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HAYYIM m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAIM).
HAZAEL m Biblical
Means "God sees" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Aram in the Old Testament.
HE f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
HEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEATH m English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley.
HEBEL m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew הֶבֶל (see HEVEL).
HEBER (1) m Irish
Anglicized form of ÉIBHEAR.
HEBER (2) m Biblical
Means "enclave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name is borne by a great-grandson of Jacob and also by the husband of Jael.
HECK m Scottish
Scottish short form of HECTOR.
HECKIE m Scottish
Scottish diminutive of HECTOR.
HÉCTOR m Spanish
Spanish form of HECTOR.
HÈCTOR m Catalan
Catalan form of HECTOR.
HECTOR m English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek Ἕκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ἕκτωρ (hektor) meaning "holding fast", ultimately from ἔχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends where it belongs to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HED m & f Hebrew
Means "echo" in Hebrew.
HEDDWYN m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
HÉDI (2) m Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic هادي (see HADI) chiefly used in Tunisia (using French-influenced orthography).
HEDLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEFIN m Welsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
HEIDRICH m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements heid "kind, sort, type" and ric "ruler, mighty".
HEIKE f & m Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKI m Estonian
Estonian form of Heinrich (see HENRY).
HEIKKI m Finnish
Finnish form of Heinrich (see HENRY).
HEIKO m Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEILYN m Welsh
Means "winebearer" in Welsh.
HEIMIR m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Norse cognate of HAMA. In the Volsungasaga he is a king of Hlymdalir.
HEIMIRICH m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HENRY.
HEIN m Dutch
Diminutive of HENDRIK.
HEINER m German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINO m German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEINRICH m German, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HEINZ m German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEITOR m Portuguese
Portuguese form of HECTOR.
HEKTOR m Greek Mythology
Greek form of HECTOR.
HÉLDER m Portuguese
Meaning uncertain. It was borne by the Brazilian archbishop Dom Hélder Câmara (1909-1999) who was noted for his charity. It could be from the name of the Dutch town of Den Helder (possibly meaning "hell's door" in Dutch). Alternatively, it might be derived from the Germanic given name HULDERIC.
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