Names Categorized "architects"

This is a list of names in which the categories include architects.
gender
usage
Adolf m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
Ahmad m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bengali, Pashto, Indonesian, Malay, Avar
Means "most commendable, most praiseworthy" in Arabic (a superlative form of Hamid 1).
Alenka f Slovene
Slovene diminutive of Alena 1.
Alvar m Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
Álvaro m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps Alfher. Verdi used this name in his opera The Force of Destiny (1862).
Amenhotep m Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian jmn-ḥtp meaning "peace of Amon", derived from the name of the Egyptian god Amon combined with ḥtp "peace, satisfaction". This was the name of four pharaohs of the New Kingdom, including Amenhotep III, known as the Magnificent, who ruled over Egypt during a time of great prosperity.
Andrea 1 m Italian
Italian form of Andreas (see Andrew). A notable bearer of this name was Andrea Verrocchio, a Renaissance sculptor who taught Leonardo da Vinci and Perugino.
Antoine m French, African American
French form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Antoni m Polish, Catalan
Polish and Catalan form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Arne 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
Arnolfo m Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Arnulf.
Artemisia f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Artemisios. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
Barbara f English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βάρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
Basil 2 m Arabic
Means "brave, valiant" in Arabic.
Bernard m English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
Bjarke m Danish
Danish diminutive of Bjørn.
César m French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of Caesar. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
Charles m English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
Christopher m English
From the Late Greek name Χριστόφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστός (Christos) combined with φέρω (phero) meaning "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
Daniel m English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Finnish, Estonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
Domenico m Italian
Italian form of Dominic. Domenico Veneziano was a Renaissance painter who lived in Florence.
Donato m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the Late Latin name Donatus meaning "given". Several early saints had this name. The name was also borne by two Renaissance masters: the sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi (also known as Donatello), and the architect Donato Bramante.
Eero m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of Eric. A famous bearer was the architect Eero Saarinen (1910-1961).
Elspeth f Scottish
Scottish form of Elizabeth.
Étienne m French
French form of Stephen.
Frank m English, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, French
From a Germanic name that referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France, Belgium and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They possibly derived their tribal name from a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis. In modern times it is sometimes used as a short form of Francis or Franklin.... [more]
Giotto m Italian (Rare)
Possibly from Ambrogiotto, a diminutive of Ambrogio, or Angiolotto, a diminutive of Angiolo. This name was borne by Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), an Italian painter and architect.
Girolamo m Italian
Italian form of Hieronymos (see Jerome).
Heinrich m German, Ancient Germanic
German form of Henry. This was the name of several German kings.
Imhotep m Ancient Egyptian
From Egyptian jj-m-ḥtp meaning "he comes in peace". This was the name of the architect, priest, physician and chief minister to the pharaoh Djoser. Imhotep apparently designed the step pyramid at Saqqara, near Memphis.
Inigo m English (Rare)
English form of Íñigo. It became well-known in Britain due to the 17th-century English architect Inigo Jones. He was named after his father, a Catholic who was named for Saint Ignatius of Loyola.
Isa 1 m Arabic, Persian, Albanian
Arabic form of Jesus. This form is found in the Quran and is used as a given name by Muslims. Arabic-speaking Christians instead use يسوع (Yasu') to refer to Jesus Christ.
Isamu m Japanese
From Japanese (isamu) meaning "brave" or other kanji having the same pronunciation.
Isidore m English, French, Georgian (Rare), Jewish
From the Greek name Ἰσίδωρος (Isidoros) meaning "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess Isis combined with Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.... [more]
Ivan m Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see John). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
Jacopo m Italian
Italian form of Iacobus (see James).
Jacques m French
French form of Iacobus, the New Testament Latin form of James.
Jean 1 m French
Modern French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see John). Since the 12th century it has consistently been the most common male name in France. It finally dropped from the top rank in 1958, unseated by Philippe.... [more]
Juraj m Slovak, Czech, Croatian
Slovak, Czech and Croatian form of George.
Kenzō m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "humble", (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "wise" combined with () meaning "three". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Kilian m German, Spanish, Irish, French
German and Spanish form of Cillian, as well as an Irish and French variant.
Leola f English
Feminine form of Leo.
Leonardo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Leonard. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the Mona Lisa. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
Louis m French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Ludwig. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
Ludwig m German
From the Germanic name Chlodovech meaning "famous battle", composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
Luis m Spanish
Spanish form of Louis.
Marcel m French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of Marcellus used in several languages. Notable bearers include the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922) and the French artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968).
Millard m English
From an occupational English surname meaning "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
Moshe m Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Moses.
Niccolò m Italian
Italian form of Nicholas. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.
Nikolaus m German
German form of Nicholas.
Osbert m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman Conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Philibert m French
Early variant of Filibert altered by association with Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover". This was the name of a 7th-century Frankish saint. Another famous bearer was Philibert de l'Orme (1510-1570), a French Renaissance architect.
Radovan m Slovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
Rafael m Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Form of Raphael in various languages. A famous bearer is the Spanish tennis player Rafael Nadal (1986-).
Rasim m Arabic, Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "planner, architect" in Arabic.
Richard m English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave ruler", derived from the Germanic elements ric "ruler, mighty" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
Santiago m Spanish, Portuguese
Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of James, the patron saint of Spain. This is the name of the capital city of Chile, as well as several other cities in the Spanish-speaking world.
Shigeru m Japanese
From Japanese (shigeru) meaning "lush, luxuriant", as well as other kanji having the same reading. A famous bearer is the Japanese video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto (1952-).
Taddeo m Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Thaddeus.
Thom m English
Short form of Thomas.
Timothea f Ancient Greek, Greek
Feminine form of Timothy.
Tommaso m Italian
Italian form of Thomas.
Vincenzo m Italian
Italian form of Vincent.
Walter m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
Wenzel m German
Medieval German form of Václav, via the Latinized form Wenceslaus.
William m English
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". An early saint by this name was the 8th-century William of Gellone, a cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).... [more]
Wright m English
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.