Browse Submitted Names

This is a list of submitted names in which an editor of the name is Nienna9.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Aat f Ancient Egyptian
Means “The Great One”, possibly deriving in part from the element aAw ("greatly"). Aat was a queen of the ancient Egyptian 12th dynasty.
Abdemon m Phoenician
Of unknown origin, name borne by a king of Cyprus (fl. 5th century BCE).
Abdi-milkutti m Phoenician
Possibly deriving in part from the Phoenician element 𐤌𐤋𐤊 milk ("king"). Name borne by a King of Sidon who rebelled against Assyrian rule.
Abimilki m Phoenician
Means "my father is king", deriving in part from the Phoenician element 𐤌𐤋𐤊 milk ("king"). Name borne by a prince of Tyre known from his correspondance with Akenhaten, recorded in the Amarna letters.
Abnātu f Babylonian
Means "precious stone", deriving from the Akkadian word aban nisiqtu ("a choice stone, a precious stone, a gem").
Acamapichtli m Nahuatl, Aztec
Means "a handful of reed arrows". Name borne by several rulers of Tenochtitlan.
Achuvesr m Etruscan Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a deity associated with the goddess Turan.
Adad-guppi f Babylonian
Means "Adad has saved", possibly deriving from the Old Akkadian element gamalum ("to save"). Name borne by a prominent priestess of the moon god Sin.
Adamma f Hurrian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Eblaite element ʾdm ("blood, red"). Name borne by a goddess of the Eblaite pantheon who was later incorporated into the Hurrian pantheon.
Adilchimeg f Mongolian (Rare)
From Mongolian адил (adil) meaning "like, akin, similar" and чимэг (chimeg) meaning "ornament, decoration".
Aeji f Korean
From Sino-Korean 愛 (ae) meaning "love, affection" and 智 (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or 地 (ji) meaning "earth, soil, ground". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Aénor f Breton
Breton form of the french name Éléonore.
Ae-shim f Korean
From Sino-Korean 愛 (ae) meaning "love, affection" and 沈 (sim) meaning "sink, submerge, addicted to". Other hanja combinations are possible.
Agušaya f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the whirling dancer", deriving from the Akkadian words gâšum ("to dance") and gūštum ("dance"). Attested as an epithet for Ishtar in the Hymn of Agushaya.
Ahāssunu f Babylonian
Means "their sister", deriving from the Akkadian element aḫātu ("sister") combined with the suffix -(aš)šunu ("for them (masculine plural), to them, towards them"),
Ahatmilku f Ancient Near Eastern
Possibly means "sister of the king" in Amorite. Name borne by a princess of Amurru (fl. 1265 BCE), who would go on to become queen of Ugarit (modern day Ras Shamna in Northern Syria) as the wife of King Niqmepa.
Ahhotep f Ancient Egyptian
Means "Iah is satisfied". Name borne by a Queen consort of Egypt, Great Royal Wife and Queen Regent of the Seventeenth Dynasty of Egypt.
Ahkal m Classic Mayan
Possibly means "turtle", deriving from the Classic Maya element ahk-al. This was occasionally used as an element in the names of Maya royalty.
Ahyouwaighs m Mohawk
Meaning unknown. A famous person is John Brant, who was a Mohawk leader and had a role in the War of 1812.
Aja f Near Eastern Mythology
In Mesopotamian mythology, Aja was the wife of the sun god Šamaš.
Akurgal m Sumerian
Means "descendant of the great mountain", deriving from the Sumerian elements 𒀀 a ("offspring, father"), 𒆳 kur ("mountain, highland"), and 𒃲 gal ("large, mighty, great")... [more]
Alākšu-lūmur f Babylonian
Means "may I see his path", deriving from the Akkadian element alaktu ("the route,the journey (of gods, of people)").
Alazebath f English (Rare, Archaic)
Of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of Elizabeth.
Allaituraḫḫi f Hurrian
Possibly deriving in part from the Hurrian element allai=ni ("lady, mistress"). Name borne by a Hittite ritual practitioner, likely of Hurrian origin, known from several texts that bear her name.
Allanzu f Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Hurrian element alla=i, meaning "lady, queen". Another possible element is the Hurrian alu-, meaning "to speak". Name borne by a Hurrian goddess that was often worshipped alongside Ḫepat, who was considered to be her mother.
Almas f Persian
Possibly means "diamond" in Farsi.
Alulim m Sumerian Mythology
Means "horn of the red deer" or "seed of the red deer" in Sumerian, deriving from the elements 𒀉 a ("arm, wing, horn") and 𒇻𒅆 lulim ("red deer stag"). This was the name of the legendary first king of Sumer, who is thought today to be a mythological figure... [more]
Al-ʻuzzā f Near Eastern Mythology
The ancient Arabian goddess of might, protection and love. Her name is derived from al-‘Azīz meaning "the mighty".
Ama-e f Sumerian
Possibly deriving in part from the Sumerian element ama ("mother"). Name borne by a Sumerian businesswoman who lived during the reign of Sargon of Akkad.
Amage f Scythian (Hellenized)
Of uncertain etymology. A notable bearer was Amage, a queen of the Sarmatians.
Amanikhatashan f Meroitic
May derive from the Egyptian god of the sun Amun. Name borne by a Kandake of Kush who ruled between 50 CE and 62 CE.
Amanipilade f Meroitic
May derive from name of the Egyptian god Amun. Name borne by the last reigning Kandake of Kush, who ruled between 308-320 CE.
Amanirenas f Meroitic
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a reigning Kandake of Kush between 40 BCE and 10 BCE, who famously lead Kushite armies in a war against Rome from 27 BCE to 22 BCE. It is likely she was a ruling queen, as her full title was "Amnirense qore li kdwe li" ("Ameniras, qore and kandake")
Amanishakheto f Meroitic
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a Kandake of Kush who ruled between 10 BCE and 1 CE. In Meroitic hieroglyphs her name is written "Amanikasheto" (Mniskhte or (Am)niskhete).
Amanitaraqide f Meroitic
Meaning uncertain. Possibly means "begotten of Amun", deriving from the Meroitic element terike ("to beget") and Amun, the Egyptian god of the sun and air... [more]
Amanitore f Meroitic
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a Kandake of Kush. Amanitore is often mentioned in contemporary texts as being a co-regent with Natakamani, who was the son of Amanishakheto.
Amaśilu m Old Celtic
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving from the Lepontic element *amb-aχto ("servant") combined with the patronymic suffix -ilo.
Amat-nanāya f Babylonian
Means "servant of Nanaya", deriving from the Akkadian element amtu ("woman servant").
Amat-nanāya-qerbet f Babylonian
Means "the servant of Nanaya is at hand" deriving from the Akkadian elements amtu ("woman servant") and qereb ("close ,near ,at hand ,within reach").
Amat-ninlil f Babylonian
Means "servant of Ninlil", deriving from the Akkadian element amtu ("woman servant").
Amat-tasmetu f Babylonian
Means "servant of Tashmetum", deriving from the Akkadian element amtu ("woman servant").
Amenirdis f Ancient Egyptian
Means "she was given by Amun" in Egyptian.
Amenmesse m Ancient Egyptian
Means "born of Amun" in Egyptian.
Amiltu f Babylonian
Means "servant woman", deriving from the Akkadian element amtu ("woman servant").
Amminaya f Hittite
Meaning unknown. Name borne by a Hittite queen, who is known only from a mention in a single document (KBo XIX 84,7). Her spouse is unknown, however some historians theorize that she was married to Arnuwanda II.
Ammurapi m Ancient Semitic
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by the last king of Ugarit, known from a letter he wrote to the king of Alashiya pleading for military aid during an invasion.
Amoashtart f Phoenician (Latinized)
Means "Astarte is my mother". Name borne by a queen of Sidon.
Androniqi f Albanian
Albanian borrowing of Androniki.
Ankhnesneferibre f Ancient Egyptian
Meaning "Neferibre (the prenomen of the pharoh Psamtik II) lives for her", deriving in part from the Ancient Egyptian element ankh ("life"). Name borne by a daughter of Pstamtik II who would go on to hold the offices of Divine Adoratrice of Amun and God's Wife of Amun.
Anneleen f Flemish, Dutch (Rare)
Contraction of Anne 1 and Leen.
Anniwiyanni f Hittite
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by the mother of an augur, known from a text detailing a fertility ritual involving burying clay birds on the steppe.
Annunitum f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "the skirmisher" or "the martial one". This was an epithet of Ishtar in her capacity as a war goddess. Later in the Sargonic period, Annunitum became a distinct deity in her own right.
Anshar m Sumerian Mythology
Means "whole heaven", deriving from the Sumerian elements šar ("totality, all"), and an ("sky, heaven"). Name borne by a primordial god of creation, who was viewed as the father of the sky god Anu... [more]
Antu f Near Eastern Mythology
She evolved from the Sumerian goddess Ki. ... [more]
A'Nyah f African American (Modern, Rare)
Variant of Aniyah, or a combination of Nyah with a phonetic prefix.
Anzû m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "heavenly eagle". Name borne by a Mesopotamian demon, who was drawn in the form of a huge fire and water breathing bird, or a lion-headed eagle.
Apayauq f & m Inupiat
Meaning unknown, name borne by Apayauq Reitan, the first trans woman to compete in the Iditarod (a long distance dog sledge race from Alaska to Nome).
Apemerukoyan-mat-unamerukoyan-mat f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "rising fire sparks woman" or "rising cinder sparks woman" in Ainu. It is the full name of the goddess Kamuy-huci.
Ardoxsho f Near Eastern Mythology
Kushan goddess of wealth primarily worshipped in the early first milennium CE. She is known in the Avesta as Ashi, and parallels have also been drawn with the Greek goddess Tyche, the Persian goddess Anahita, and the Buddhist deity Hariti.
Aristede m Ancient Greek (Rare)
Of unknown etymology, this was the name of an Athenian statesman referred to in Plato's dialogues.
Arsay f Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Means "earthy", deriving from the Ugaritic element ‘arṣ ("earth, underworld"), combined with the feminine suffix y. Although her role is unknown, it is theorised that she was an underworld goddess... [more]
Āryawarme m Tocharian
Possibly deriving from the Sanskrit elements ārya (“noble”), and varman ("armour, protection").
Ashima f Biblical Hebrew, Semitic Mythology
Means "the name, portion, or lot" depending on context. Possibly from the Semitic šmt 'charge, duty, function'. Also known as Ashim-Yahu, Ashima-Yaho, and Ashim-Beth-El... [more]
Ashlene f Irish (Anglicized, ?), English (Rare)
Said to be an anglicized form of Aislinn, i.e., a variant of Ashling. In some cases it might be considered a combination of Ashley and the common name suffix lene (compare Ashlyn).
Asītu-tabni f Ancient Assyrian, Babylonian
Means "you created the tower", deriving from the Akkadian elements atti ("thou, you") and banû ("to create, to build").
Aškašepa m Hittite Mythology
Means "genius of the gate/door", deriving from the Hittite element aška ("door"). Aškašepa is thought to have been a deified mountain, worshipped in Kanesh and Hattusa. He was a major member of the Hittite pantheon.
Ašmu-nikal f Hittite
While the meaning is unknown, the second element likely derives from Nikkal, a Hittite goddess derived from the Sumerian Ningal.
Ašratu f Akkadian
Akkadian form of Asherah.
Ašratum f Near Eastern Mythology
A cognate of the Ugaritic Asherah. Name borne by an Amorite goddess who was likely derived from the same source as Asherah, however she came to occupy her own distinct position in the Amorite pantheon... [more]
Āsugīsalaz m Old Norse
Deriving from the Germanic elements ansu- ("god") and gīslaz ("hostage"). This name is part of an inscription in Proto-Norse on Kragehul I, a lance-shaft from Denmark that has been dated to between 200 and 475 CE.
Athiratu f Ugaritic Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Ugaritic form of Asherah. She was worshipped under this name at her cult center in the city of Ugarit.
Atotoztli f Nahuatl, Aztec
Means "water parrot", deriving from the Nahuatl elements atl ("water, a body of water") and toztli ("yellow parrot"). Name borne by an Aztec queen that possibly ruled as tlatoani (ruler of a city-state) in her own right.
Ausi'i m Akkadian
Akkadian form of Hosea.
Ayauhcihuatl f Nahuatl, Aztec
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving in part from the Classical Nahuatl elements ayahuitl ("fog") and cihuatl ("woman, wife"). Name borne by an Empress of Tenochtitlan (fl. 1400).
Ayrien m & f Obscure (?)
Of uncertain etymology.
Ayu-ikalti f Hurrian Mythology
The Hurrian name for the Sumerian sun goddess Aya 3, who was incorporated into the Hurrian pantheon. This name likely derives from the phrase Aya kallatu, meaning "Aya, the bride".
Ayuush m Mongolian
Possibly deriving in part from the Mongolian аюул (ayu) meaning "danger". Name borne by a prominent Mongolian composer and artist (1903-1938).
Azayamankawin f Sioux
Means "berry picker". Name borne by a Mdewakanton Dakota woman, known for running a ferry service in St Paul Minnesota, and for sitting for many photographic portraits.
Aze f Arabic
Possibly a variant of Azza.
Azza f Arabic
Possibly meaning "young female gazelle", deriving from the Arabic word azaza ("it was dear, it was expensive" referring to the difficulty in catching young gazelles).
Ba'alah f Near Eastern Mythology
Deriving from the feminine form of the Phoenician bʿl ("Lord, master, owner"). This title was used for several goddesses of the Phoenician and Canaanite pantheons.
Bahlam m Classic Mayan
Means "jaguar", deriving from the Classic Maya element balam ("jaguar"). This was used as a name element by Classic Maya royalty.
Baltis f Semitic Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Arabian goddess associated with the planet Venus.
Banât-esagil f Babylonian
Means "Esagil is beautiful", deriving from the Akkadian element banûtu ("beauty").
Bangura m & f Mende
Means "strong" and "child of God" in Mende.
Banitu f Ancient Assyrian
Of unknown etymology. Possibly derived from either Akkadian banītu meaning "beautiful", or bānītu (also Akkadian), meaning "divine Creatress". Banitu was a queen of the Neo Assyrian empire circa 729 BCE.
Bara-irnun f Sumerian
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving in part from the Sumerian element bára, meaning "throne dais, ruler". Name borne by a queen of the city of Umma (fl. 2400 BCE).
Baranamtarra f Sumerian
Etymology unknown, possibly deriving from Sumerian elements nam meaning "(area of) responsibility; destiny, fate, lot" and tar meaning "deliberate, judicious". Name borne by a queen of Lagash (circa 2384 BCE), known for her involvement in the trade of wool, silver, and bronze between Lagash, Dilmun, and Umma.
Barangaroo f Indigenous Australian
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by an Eora woman of the Cammeraygal clan (fl. 1780s).
Bašmu m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "venomous snake", possibly deriving from the Sumerian elements muš ("snake, reptile") and ("venom, poison"). Name borne by a figure from Mesopotamian mythology, a horned snake with two forelegs and wings.
Batkhuyag f Mongolian
Etymology uncertain. Possibly means "armoured hero", deriving from the Mongolian elements баатар (baatar) meaning "hero" and хуяг (khuyag) meaning "armour".
Bēl-bullissu m Babylonian
Means "Bel, keep him alive", deriving from the Akkadian element balāṭu ("to revive ; to keep alive, healthy").
Bēleta f Babylonian
Means "lady", deriving from the Akkadian element bēltu ("lady, mistress").
Bēlet-bābili f Babylonian, Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of Babylon", deriving from the Akkadian element belet (mistress, lady). This was a Babylonian name for the goddess Ishtar. Ishtar was worshipped under this name in the temple of Eturkalamma.
Bēlet-balāṭi f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "mistress of life", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlet ("mistress or lady") and balāṭu ("life, vigour, good health"). This was possibly an Akkadian name for the goddess Nungal.
Belet-eanna f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
An Akkadian name for the goddess Inanna, specifically in her capacity as Inanna of Uruk. Likely derives in part from the Akkadian belet ("mistress or lady").
Belet-ekallim f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "Mistress of the Palace", from Akkadian element belet ("mistress or lady"). This was the Akkadian name for the Sumerian goddess Ninegal.
Belet-ili f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of the gods" or "mother of the gods" in Akkadian, deriving from the elements beltu ("lady, mistress") and ilu ("god, deity"). It is another name for the mother goddess Ninhursag.
Belet-nagar f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Mistress of Nagar" (an ancient city in Syria), from the Akkadian element belet (meaning "mistress or lady"). Belet-Nagar was a tutelary goddess associated with kingship. She was possibly an Akkadian equivalent to the Hittite goddess Nabarbi.
Belet-ninua f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Lady of Nineveh", deriving from Akkadian elements belet ("lady") and ninua (likely an Akkadian form of Nineveh).
Belet-seri f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "mistress of the steppe". The name borne by an underworld goddess in the court of Ereshkigal who was tasked with recording information about the dead entering the afterlife... [more]
Belet-uruk-atkal f Babylonian
Means "I trusted in the Lady of Uruk", deriving from the Akkadian element belet ("mistress, lady").
Bēl-ṣarbi m Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "lord of the poplar", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlu ("boss, chief, master, lord") and ṣarbat (deriving from a place name, that presumably later became associated with groves of trees... [more]
Benerib f Ancient Egyptian
The name of a queen consort of the first dynasty in Ancient Egypt, meaning "sweet of heart", deriving from the Ancient Egyptian elements bene ("sweet") and ib ("heart").
Benyapa f Thai
Of uncertain etymology.
Berlie f English (Rare), American (South, Archaic)
Berlie Doherty (born 1943) is an English novelist, poet, playwright and screenwriter. She is best known for children's books, for which she has twice won the Carnegie Medal.
Bilegsaikhan f Mongolian
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Mongolian elements билэг (bileg) meaning "gift, talent" and сайхан (saikhan) meaning "nice, beautiful, handsome".
Bimini f & m Popular Culture (Modern, Rare)
Means “two islands” in the Lucayan language of the Bahamas.
Bingfu m & f Chinese
From Chinese 冰 (bīng) meaning "ice, cold" combined with 福 () meaning "happiness, good fortune, blessing". Other character combinations are possible.
Birtum m Near Eastern Mythology
Means "fetter" or "shackle". Birtum was an underworld god, regarded as the husband of Nungal.
Bissāya f Babylonian
Of as yet unknown etymology, this name is attested several times in various Babylonian legal records from the Late Assyrian period.
Bithnanaia f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Bithnanaia was a Palmyrene goddess, considered to be the daughter of the god Konon.
Bizilla f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "she who is pleasing". Bizilla was a love goddess considered to be the "sukkal" (vizier deity) for the goddess Ninlil. She is occasionally counted among the courtiers of Inanna, and is also closely associated with Nanaya.
Buluqhan f Medieval Mongolian
Means "sable", deriving from the Mongolian element bulga ("sable").
Bumper m American (Modern, Rare)
From the English word “bumper”. A famous bearer of this name is American football player, Bumper Pool.
Cacamacihuatl f Nahuatl, Aztec
Etymology uncertain, possibly from the Classical Nahuatl elements cacamatl "small corncobs, small ears of corn" and cihuatl "woman, wife". Name borne by a queen of Tenochtitlan.
Camadevi f Medieval, Thai (Archaic, ?), Mon (?)
Etymology uncertain. Name borne by a queen of Hariphunchai (an ancient Mon kingdom, which is part of modern-day Thailand).
Cartimandua f History, Old Celtic
Celtic name, in which the second element is mandu "pony, colt, filly". The first element is less certain, perhaps from karti "drive out", or it may mean "clean, sleek". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Brigantes.
Chae-hyun f Korean
From Sino-Korean 采 (chae) meaning "collect, gather, pluck" or 彩 (chae) meaning "colour", and 賢 (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able". Other hanja combinations are also possible.
Chansia f English (Modern, Rare)
Unknown. Also a locality in Ghana
Checheikhen f Medieval Mongolian
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a daughter of Genghis Khan and his first wife Börte.
Chimaltetlacauh m Nahuatl
Etymology uncertain, possibly contains the elements chimalli "shield" and cuauhcozcatl "wooden collar (for slaves)".
Chimalxochitl f Nahuatl
Means "sunflower" in Nahuatl, from chimalli "shield" and xōchitl "flower".
Chiomara f Old Celtic, Galatian
Meaning uncertain, possibly deriving in part from the Galatian element *māro- ("great"). Name borne by a Galatian noblewoman in the 2nd century BCE.
Chuldu f Ancient Aramaic
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a Nabatean queen who ruled alongside her husband Aretas IV.
Coquannathacka m Indigenous American, Yavapai
Means "green leaves" in Yavapai. Name borne by a Yavapé Yavapai leader.
Cui-hua f Chinese
From the elements 粹 cui ("pure") and 华 hua ("magnificent, splendid, Chinese"). Other character combinations are also possible.
Cynosure f Astronomy
From the Ancient Greek elements κυνός (kunós) “dog's” and οὐρά (ourá) meaning “tail”. This is an alternate name for Ursa Minor.
Dadhikra m Sanskrit
Possibly deriving from the Sanskrit elements दधि (dadhi), meaning "thickened milk, curd" and kri, meaning "to scatter". This possibly refers to the effect of the morning sun on dew... [more]
Daduhepa f Hittite
Of uncertain etymology, although the second element of the name (hepa) likely derives from the Hurrian sun goddess Ḫepat. Name borne by a Hittite queen who was possibly the wife of Tudhaliya I. She is known to have occupied the role of Tawananna (ruling queen) during the reign of Šuppiluliuma I, who is thought to have been her son.
Dalbyeol f & m Korean (Modern, Rare)
Means "satellite" from 달 (dal, “moon”) combined with 별 (byeol, “star”).
Dalilu-essu m Babylonian
Means "new praise", deriving from the Akkadian elements dalīlu ("praise, thanks") and eššu ("new, modern").
Damgalnuna f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "great wife of the prince", deriving from the Sumerian elements dam, meaning "spouse, husband or wife", 𒃲 gal, meaning "great, mighty", and nun, meaning "prince, noble, master"... [more]
Damkina f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "true wife", deriving from the Akkadian element kīnu "honest, trustworthy, faithful". The Akkadian name for the goddess Damgalnuna. She was the consort of Enki and mother of the god Marduk... [more]
Damqāya f Babylonian
Means "good", deriving from the Akkadian element damqu ("good, pretty, nice").
Danuhepa f Hittite
Etymology uncertain. The second element of the name (hepa) likely derives from the Hurrian sun goddess Ḫepat. Danuhepa was a Hittite queen who was likely the wife of Mursili II.
Deeba f Sindhi
Means "silk, or eye of a mistress" in Sindhi. Also In the case of Pakistani film actress Deeba (1947-) and Indian-Muslim writer Deeba Salim Irfan (1969-).
Denahi m Popular Culture
A character from the film Brother Bear.
Dexamene f Greek Mythology
Means "reservoir, tank, receptacle" or "one who receives, one who is receptive", derived from Greek δέχομαι (dekhomai) meaning "to receive, accept". This is the name of one of the Nereids.
Dhat-badan f Semitic Mythology
The name of an Himyarite nature goddess worshipped in Yemen, Somalia and Ethiopia, associated with the oasis, nature and the wet season. Etymology uncertain, it may mean "she of the wild goats".
Dhat-ba'dhanum f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Etymology uncertain. This was another name given to the sun goddess Shams.
Dian Cécht m Irish Mythology
Derived from Old Irish dían meaning "swift" and cécht meaning "power". Name borne by one of the Tuatha Dé Dannan, who was the grandfather of the god Lugh.
Dilbat f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the planet Venus". This was an epithet for Ishtar, attested in the Babylonian text, "The Cuthean Legend of Naram-Sin".
Dinon m Ancient Greek
Of unknown etymology, name borne by an ancient Greek historian (fl. c. 360–340 BC).
Djeseretnebti f Ancient Egyptian
Possibly means "the noble one who lives for the two ladies", deriving from the Ancient Egyptian element nb ("lady"). Djeseretnebti was possibly the wife of King Sekhemket, although her existence is contested, as she is known primarily from clay seals and ivory cloth labels.
Djimain m Guernésiais
Guernésiais form of James.
Dobrodeia f Medieval Ukrainian, History
Dobrodeia of Kiev (died 16 November 1131), was a Rus' princess, spouse of the Byzantine co-emperor Alexios Komnenos, and author on medicine.
Dodam m & f Korean
Possibly meaning "firm and ripe" or "growing well".
Doukissa f Greek
Means "duchess" in Greek.
Drypetis f Old Persian (Hellenized)
Of uncertain etymology. Drypetis was the daughter of Stateira I and Darius III of Persia. She was married to Hephaestion and was rumored to have been killed by Roxana to remove potential rivals.
Duela f Popular Culture
Duela Dent is the Joker's daughter in DC comics.
Dumqišu-āmur f Babylonian
Means "I saw his goodness", from the Akkadian elements damqu ("good, pretty, nice"), iššû ("his, hers"), and amāru ("to see (someone, something)").
Dushara m Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly meaning "the one of Shara". Name borne by a pre-Islamic Arabian god, who was possibly considered to be the son of Al-lat. He was worshipped by the Nabataeans at Petra and Madain Saleh.
Ea-niša f Sumerian, Ancient Near Eastern
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving from the name of the god Ea 1, and the Sumerian element nisig ("beautiful, blue, green")... [more]
Eḫli-nikkal f Ancient Near Eastern, Hurrian, Hittite
Means "let Nikkal keep safe", deriving from the name of the goddess Nikkal, and the Hurrian element eġl=i ("to keep safe"). This name was borne by a Hittite princess, who was likely the daughter of Tudhaliya IV.
Ehyophsta f Cheyenne
Means "yellow-haired woman". Name borne by a Cheyenne woman who fought in the Battle of Beecher Island.
Ekʼ f Classic Mayan
Means "star", deriving from the Classic Maya element ek’ ("star").
Ekʼ-naah f Classic Mayan
Means "star house", deriving from the Classic Maya elements ek' ("star") and na' ("house, structure"). Name borne by a prominent Maya queen of Kaan (fl. 520 CE).
Ekpe m Ibibio, Western African
Possibly a shortened variant of Ekpedeme.
Eluid m & f English (African, ?)
Of uncertain etymology.
Enlil-nadin-apli m Babylonian
Means "Enlil (is) giver of an heir". Name borne by the fifth king of the 2nd dynasty of Isin, who ruled from c. 1099–1096 BC.
Enshakushanna m Sumerian
Possibly deriving from Sumerian elements en meaning "dignitary; lord; high priest", ur-saĝ meaning "hero, warrior" and an meaning "sky, heaven; the god An". Name of a King of Uruk (c... [more]
Entemena m Sumerian
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving in part from the Sumerian element en, meaning "lord, high priest, dignitary". Name borne by a king of Lagash, notable for being named in the earliest known peace treaty between two kings.
Enten m Sumerian Mythology
Means "winter", deriving from the Sumerian entena ("winter"). Enten was a fertility god that was specifically identified with the fertility of livestock during the winter period.
Erra m Near Eastern Mythology, Babylonian, Akkadian
The Babylonian god of war, death, and other disasters. He may be identified with Nergal, the god of death. Erra expressed death himself symbolically by his continuous lethargy as he lay in a drunken stupor... [more]
Esagilāya f Babylonian
Means "of Esagil". Esagil was a temple dedicated to the god Marduk.
Esharra-hammat f Ancient Assyrian
From from Akkadian elements ešarra (the name of a temple), and ḫammat meaning "mistress". Possibly means, "In Ešarra, she is mistress". Name of a queen of the Neo-Assyrian empire (c... [more]
Eshmunazar m Phoenician
Meaning "Eshmun helps" (Eshmun was a Phoenician god of healing and the tutelary god of Sidon). Name borne by two kings of Sidon.
Etana m Sumerian
The thirteenth god-king of the Sumerian dynasty ruling the city of Kish. He was appointed by Anu himself. Etana had no son and prayed daily to Shamash, the sun-god, to grant him a child... [more]
Everic m African American (Rare)
Of uncertain etymology.
Ewar m English (Australian, ?)
Of uncertain etymology.
Faizallah m Arabic
Means "victory of Allah" in Arabic, from فائز (Faiz) combined with الله (Allah).
Faria f Persian, Urdu
Possibly means "blessed, magnificent".
Fengjiao f Chinese
From Chinese 凤 (fèng) meaning "phoenix, firebird, fenghuang" and 娇 (jiāo) meaning "tender, delicate", as well as other character combinations that can form this name.
Flau’jae f English (American, Modern, Rare)
Borne by American athlete and rapper Flau’Jae Johnson (2003-) whose name is derived from her father’s stage name Camouflage.
Fredella f English (Modern, Rare)
Possibly an elaboration of the name Fred, utilizing the popular feminine suffix -ella.
Gabbi-ina-qātē f Babylonian
Means "In the hands (of the gods) is totality", deriving from the Akkadian element kalû ("totality, all").
Gambara f Lombardic
Possibly derives from the Old High German *gand-bera or gand-bara meaning "wand-bearer" (a term for seeresses or women that made prophecies). Another possible origin is from the Old High German gambar meaning "strenuous".
Garshasp m Persian Mythology, Middle Persian
Of uncertain etymology. This name was borne by a monster-slaying hero in Iranian mythology.
Gassulawiya f Hittite
Possibly means "woman of Kashulas" (a settlement in the Kashka region of the Hittite empire), deriving from the Luwian element wiya ("woman").
Geatflæd f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements Geat "Geat" (a North Germanic tribe living around modern day Götaland; see gautaz) and flæd, possibly meaning "beauty".
Geme-ninlilla f Sumerian, Ancient Near Eastern
Of uncertain etymology, however the last element is likely derived from the goddess Ninlil. Geme-Ninlilla was a wife of King Shulgi during the final years of his reign.
Genepil f Mongolian
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving in part from the Mongolian element ᢉᠡᠨᠡᠨ (genen) meaning "fond" or ᢉᠡᠨᠡᠨ (genen) meaning "naive". Name borne by the last queen concert of Mongolia (1905-1938).
Geštinanna f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of an early goddess of Southern Mesopotamia associated with writing and the netherworld. Her name means "wine (or vine) of the heavens (or the god An 2)", deriving from the Sumerian element ĝeštin ("vine, wine, bunch of grapes")... [more]
Gilukhipa f Hurrian
Means "Ḫepat is my strength" in Hurrian. Hepat is a sun goddess, whose name is commonly seen as an element in Hurrian and Hittite theophoric names... [more]
Gummarus m Frankish (Latinized), Germanic (Latinized), History (Ecclesiastical), Dutch (Rare), Flemish (Rare)
Latinization of the Germanic name Gummar, of which the first element is either gumô meaning "man" or gunda meaning "battle, war" (compare Gundemar)... [more]
Gynecia f Literature
From the archaic English adjective gynecian meaning "of women, relating to women, womanly", a derivative of Greek γυνή (gyne) "woman". This is the name of the duchess of Arcadia and mother of Pamela in Sir Philip Sidney's poem The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia (ca... [more]
Ḫabūrītum f Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly means either "the one from Ḫabura" (a name borne by several settlements in ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia) or "the one from the Khabur river". Name borne by a river goddess worshipped as part of the Hurrian pantheon.
Haidan m & f Chinese (Rare)
Deriving from the Chinese elements 海 (hǎi "sea,ocean"), and 丹 (dān "red, cinnabar"). Other character combinations are also possible.
Haiyang f Chinese
From Chinese 海 (hǎi) meaning "sea, ocean" and Chinese 洋 (yáng) meaning "ocean". Other character combinations are possible.
Halla m & f Korean
Of uncertain etymology.
Hamady m Western African
A variant of the Arabic name Hamad, meaning "praiseworthy".
Haneko f Japanese (Rare)
From the Japanese elements 羽 hane meaning "feather, plume", and 子 ko meaning "child, sign of the rat".
Hanish m Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly deriving from the Akkadian word ḫanīšum ("submission"), although this etymology is contested. Name borne by a god of destruction, that was always invoked alongside his twin Shullat.
Hannahannah f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
From Hittite hanna- meaning "grandmother". She is a Hurrian Mother Goddess related to or influenced by the pre-Sumerian goddess Inanna. Hannahannah was also identified with the Hurrian goddess Ḫepat.
Ḫapantali f Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Anatolian and Luwian pastoral goddess associated with sheep.
Harapšeki f Hittite
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived in part from the Hittite element ḫāran ("eagle"). Name borne by a Hittite queen (fl. 15th century BCE).
Ḫarapšili f Hittite
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived in part from the Hittite element ḫāran ("eagle"). Name borne by a Hittite queen (fl. circa 1550 BCE).
Ḫaštayar f Hittite
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a Hittite noblewoman who was speculated to be either a daughter or a wife of Hattusili I.
Hatepuna f Near Eastern Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Her name originates in Hattic ha "sea" and puna "child". She is the daughter of the sea god and becomes the wife of Telipinu because of the rescue of Ištanu.
Hattusa-ziti m Hittite
Possibly means "man from Hattusa", deriving from the Luwian element ziti ("man"). The city of Hattusa was a major political center for the Hittite Empire. Name borne by an envoy of Suppiluliuma I, who was sent to the court of the Egyptian queen Ankhesenamun.
Hazard m English (American)
Middle name of famous US commander Oliver Hazard Perry
Ȟéla m Sioux
Means "little mountain" in Lakota. This is the Lakota name of famous basketball player Kyrie Irving, an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe through his late mother.
Ḫenti f Hittite
Meaning uncertain, name borne by a Hittite queen who was the first wife of King Suppiluliuma I.
Ḫepat f Hurrian Mythology
Means "She of Halab". Ḫepat was the mother goddess of the Hurrian people. Her name occurs frequently as an element of personal names, examples being the names Puduḫepa, and Tadukhipa.
Hetephernebti f Ancient Egyptian
Possibly means "Peaceful and Noble", with the second element deriving from the royal title nebti.
Himika f Japanese
From Japanese 日 (hi) meaning "sun, day", 美 (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with 香 (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hinook-Mahiwi-Kalinaka f Indigenous American, Ho-Chunk
Means "fleecy cloud floating in place" in the Ho-Chunk language. This was the Ho-Chunk name of painter and teacher Angel De Cora Dietz.
Ḫišamītum f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Means "Lady of Ḫišamta" (a city in the kingdom of Mari), utilising the Akkadian feminine suffix tum. Name borne by the tutelary goddess of Ḫišamta, who is thought to have been a localised adaptation of Ishtar.
Hoelun f Medieval Mongolian
Etymology uncertain. Name borne by an Olkhonud woman, who was the mother of Genghis Khan.
Hongxue f Chinese
From the Chinese elements 宏 hóng ("great, magnificent") and 雪 xuě ("snow, snowfall"). Other character combinations are also possible.
Hopokoekau f Indigenous American, Ho-Chunk
Means "glory of the morning" or "the coming dawn" in the Ho-Chunk language. From the Ho-Chunk hąp meaning 'day', ho- 'the time at which', gu 'to come arriving', the feminine affix -wį, and the definite article -ga (used for personal names).
Hubal m Near Eastern Mythology
May mean "master god". From the Aramaic hu meaning 'spirit, god', and Ba'al 'master, lord'.... [more]
Huitzilxochtzin f Nahuatl
From Nahuatl huitzilin, meaning "hummingbird", xōchitl "flower", and the diminutive or reverential suffix "-tzin", often used in Aztec royal families. This was another name of Atotoztli II, the regent or possible tlatoani (ruler) of Tenochtitlan.
Humbaba m Sumerian Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a figure from Mesopotamian mythology, whose name has been attested both with and without the dingir 𒀭 (a determinative sign written before the names of gods and goddesses)... [more]
Hushi f & m Chickasaw, Choctaw
The Chickasaw and Choctaw word for "Sun".
Hutellura f Hurrian Mythology
Likely means "midwife", deriving from the Hurrian hutelluri. Hutellura was a goddess of fate, and a divine midwife. In her role as a divine midwife she is closely associated with Hutena.
Hutena f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Likely derived from the Hurrian ḫut, which has been translated as both "to favour" and "to raise". Hutena was a goddess of fate in Hurrian mythology, and was also a divine midwife. In her role as a divine midwife, she is associated closely with Hutellura.
Ḫuwaššanna f Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a goddess worshipped as part of the Hittite and Luwian pantheons. Her main centers of worship were in Ḫupišna and Kuliwišna.
Huzālu m Babylonian
Means "gazelle", deriving from the Akkadian ḫuzālu ("gazelle kid").
Hyang-sim f Korean
Possibly deriving from the Sino-Korean elements 香 (hyang "fragrant, sweet-smelling, incense") and 沈 (sim "sink, submerge, addicted to"). Other hanja combinations are possible.
Hye-deok m Korean
From Sino-Korean 惠 "favor, benefit, confer kindness" (hye) and 德 "ethics, morality, virtue" (deok). Other Hanja combinations are also possible.
Hye-joo f Korean
From Sino-Korean 慧 (hye) "bright, intelligent" and 舟 (joo) "boat, ship." Other Hanja combinations are also possible.
Hye-young f Korean
From Sino-Korean 惠 (hye) meaning "benefit, to confer kindness" or 慧 (hye) meaning "bright, intelligent" and 英 (young) meaning " petal, flower, leaf". Other hanja combinations are possible.
Iaba f Ancient Aramaic
Possibly derives from one of the following West Semitic elements: yph ("beautiful"), nby ("to name") or yhb ("to give"). Name borne by an Assyrian queen, who was possibly of Aramean origin.
Iaera f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἴαιρα (Iaira) possibly meaning "the honeyed". This was borne by one of the Nereids (daughters of Nereus and Doris) in Greek mythology.
Iáivé m Theology
Irish form of Yahweh or Jehovah.
Ibaqa f Medieval Mongolian
Etymology uncertain, name borne by a Kerait princess that became a wife of Genghis Khan. He divorced her after two years of marriage, and she remarried to the general Jürchedei.
Illuyanka m Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Likely means "snake", from Proto-Indo-European elements *h₁illu- and *h₂engʷeh₂. Illuyanka was the name of a serpentine dragon in Hittite mythology, who was slain by the sky god Tarhunz... [more]
Ina-egasil-ramat f Babylonian
Means "She dwells in Esagil". Name borne by the mother of Nupta, who was the wife of Itti-marduk-balatu... [more]
Ina-eturkalamma-alsišu f Babylonian
Means "In Eturkalamma, I called out to him", deriving from the Akkadian element šasû ("to shout, to call for"). Eturkalamma was a temple to Ishtar in Babylon, where she was worshipped as Bēlet-bābili.
Ina-ṣilli-esabad f Babylonian
Means "In the protection of Esabad" (the temple of the medicine goddess Gula), from the Akkadian ina ṣilli ("under the aegis of, in shadow, in the shade").
Inbāya f Babylonian
Means "fruit", deriving from the Akkadian inbu ("fruit").
Inenek f Ancient Egyptian
Meaning uncertain, name borne by a queen consort of Pharoah Pepi I.
Inseon f Korean
Deriving from the Sino-Korean elements 仁 (in), meaning "benevolence, kindness, humaneness", and 善 (seon) meaning "good, virtuous, charitable, kind" or 仙 (seon) meaning "immortal, transcendent, Taoist super-being"... [more]
Iršappa m Hurrian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
The Hurrian name for the god Resheph. He was worshipped under this name in the Hurrian pantheon and was regarded as a god of commerce and the marketplace.
Ishara f Near Eastern Mythology
An ancient Hittite goddess associated with love and oaths. Her name possibly comes from the Hittite word for "treaty, binding promise", or may be related to the name of the goddess Ishtar.
Ištanu m & f Near Eastern Mythology
Deriving from the Hattic estan meaning "Sun deity, day". This was an epithet likely used to refer to the of the Sun Goddess of Arinna. It was also used in reference to a solar deity known as the Sun God of Heaven (equivalent to the Hurrian Simige).
Ištapariya f Hittite
Possibly deriving from the Luwian element tapar, meaning "strong, mighty". Name borne by a Hittite queen (fl. 15th Century BCE), who was possibly of Luwian origin. Queen Ištapariya was assassinated during a period of political intrigue by rivals to her husband's throne.
Isthar f Spanish (Rare)
Variant spelling of Ishtar.
Itti-marduk-balatu m Babylonian
Means "With Marduk there is life". Name borne by a king of the 2nd dynasty of Isin, who ruled c. 1135–1128 BC.
Iyarri m Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Iyarri was a god of plague and war in both the Hittite and Luwian pantheons. He is known from oaths sworn in the in the Šuppiluliuma-Šattiwazza treaty, where he is depicted as a man standing on the back of a lion.
Jamukha m Medieval Mongolian
Of uncertain etymology. Jamukha was a Mongol military and political leader and the chief rival to Temüjin (later Genghis Khan) in the unification of the Mongol tribes.
Járnsaxa f Norse Mythology, Astronomy
From Old Norse járn "iron" and sax "dagger, short sword".... [more]
Jorin f Thai
Of uncertain etymology.
Kabtāya f Babylonian
Means "honoured", deriving from the Akkadian element kabātu ("to be honored, shown respect").
Kammamma f Hittite Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a goddess considered to be the daughter of the storm god Tarhunna. She was possibly associated with magic, as one of her known epithets is ḫašawanz ("sorceress").
Kamrušepa f Hittite Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Kamrušepa was a Hittite goddess of medicine and magic, who was also worshipped as part of the Luwian pantheon during the Bronze age. She seems to have been associated with the Mesopotamian goddess Gula.
Kanishka m Tocharian
Of uncertain etymology. Possible name elements include the Tocharian elements kän ("to fulfill, to come to pass") and kene ("melody, tune"), and the Indo-Iranian element *kanH ("to love, to take pleasure in, to dig")... [more]
Karangarang f Indigenous Australian
Possibly means "pelican", deriving from the Dharug word karranga-ba ("pelican"). Name borne by a prominent Eora woman (1771-1837).
Kashta m Meroitic
This name means possibly "the Kushite." It was the name of the Kushite King Kashta (fl. 8th century BCE) of the Kingdom of Kush who egyptianized Nubia and started the Kushite takeover of Upper Egypt.
Kataḫziwuri f Near Eastern Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Possibly deriving from the Hattian elements kattaḫ ("queen") and wur ("country). Name borne by a Hattian and Palaic goddess known from texts surrounding purification and building rituals... [more]
Katešḫapi m & f Hittite
Means "King of the Gods", from the Hittite elements katte ("king") and ašḫab ("god"). The name of a Hittite god, which was also borne by a queen of the Middle Kingdom period of the Hittite empire, who is known only from fragmentary documents... [more]
Kattaḫḫa f Hittite Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Likely deriving from the Hattic word kattaḫ ("queen"), this theonym was applied to several goddesses, the most prominent of whom was the tutelary goddess of the city of Ankuwa. She is listed alongside other 'queen goddesses' in treaties, such as Ḫuwaššanna.
Kaytey f English (American, Modern, Rare)
This is a variant of the name Katie.
Khawisara f Thai
Possibly means "great poet", deriving from จอม (jom), meaning "top, highest point, peak" and กวี (gà-wee), meaning "poet, bard".
Khaye f Yiddish
Possibly a feminine variant of Kayem (itself a variant spelling of Chaim).
Khebe f Hittite Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain. Name borne by a tutelary deity in the Hurrian and Hittite pantheons.
Khedebneithirbinet f Ancient Egyptian
Ancient Egyptian feminine name meaning “Neith Kills the Evil Eye”, deriving in part from the Ancient Egyptian verb xdb ("to kill").
Khutulun f Medieval Mongolian
Of uncertain etymology, name borne by a Mongol noblewoman renowned for her athletic prowess and strength in battle (c.1260 - c.1306).
Kiaše m Hurrian Mythology
Means "sea", deriving from the ordinary Hurrian noun. Name borne by a Hurrian deity that represented the sea, who was also worshipped in Ugarit and Alalakh. He was often seen as an ally of the god Kumarbi.
Kikisoblu f Duwamish, Salishan
A Duwamish female name.... [more]
Kikuhime f Japanese (Rare, Archaic)
From 菊 (kiku) meaning "chrysanthemum" combined with 姫 (hime, ki) meaning "princess". Name borne by a noble woman of the Ōtomo clan (d. 1595).
Kiluš-ḫepa f Hittite
Possibly means "Messenger of Ḫepat" deriving from the Hattic element kiluḫ ("spy, scout, messenger"), with the second element hepa likely deriving from the name of the Hurrian sun goddess Hepat... [more]
Kimiyo f Japanese
Means "beginning, generation, beautiful, righteous" and "child, main, given" in Japanese. Known bearers of this name include the Japanese former tennis player Kimiyo Hatanaka (1944-), Japanese table tennis player Kimiyo Matsuzaki (1938-), and Japanese artist Kimiyo Mishima (1932-).
Kinnaru m Ugaritic Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Possibly meaning "lyre", from the Ugaritic word knr. As this word is used in both reference to the stringed instrument, and to the god Kinnaru, it is thought that Kinnaru was a deification of the lyre.
Kishar f Near Eastern Mythology
Her name is argued to mean "the whole earth", possibly deriving from the Akkadian element kili ("all, whole, totality"). The name of an Akkadian goddess that represented the Earth, with her twin Anshar representing the sky... [more]
Kompiang m & f Balinese
Means "great-grandchild" or "first-born" in Balinese.
Konzapeas m Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized)
Hellenized variant of the Luwian name Kwanza-piya attested from Isauria during the classical period.
Kośio m Old Celtic
A Lepontic name deriving from the Proto-Celtic element *gostiyos ("guest").
Kothar-wa-khasis m Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Means "skillful and wise". Name borne by an Ugaritic god of craftsmanship and magic. Some academics consider him to be equivalent to the Greek god Hephaestus.
Kubaba f Hurrian Mythology
Of unknown etymology. Kubaba (kug-ba-u) was the name of minor Hurro-Hittite goddess. A Sumerian queen that ruled in the Early Dynastic III (ca. 2500–2330 BC) period of Sumer, also went by this name... [more]
Kuilix f Indigenous American, Salishan
Means "red one" or "red shirt". Name borne by a Kalispel woman (fl. 1832) who led a band of warriors.
Kuišḫamaššani f Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Means "any god", deriving from the Luwian word maššan(i) ("god"). Name borne by a goddess of the Luwian pantheon, who was often depicted holding grapes.
Kulaprabhavati f Khmer (Archaic, ?), Sanskrit
Meaning uncertain, possibly deriving in part from the Sanskrit element कुल (kula) meaning "family". Name borne by a ruling queen of Funan (present day Cambodia), who ruled from 514-517 CE.
Kurmanjan f Kyrgyz
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a prominent Kyrgyz politician (1811-1907) who served as Datka (governer) of Alai from 1862 until her death.
Kurunnītu f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Likely means "high quality beer", deriving from the Akkadian kurunnum (itself a derivation of the Sumerian kurun). Name borne by an Akkadian goddess, likely equivalent to the Sumerian goddess of beer Ninkasi.
Kurunnitu-sarrat f Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Possibly means "Kurunnitu is queen", derived from the goddess Kurunnītu, and šarrat ("queen").
Kurunnitu-tabni f Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Possibly means "Kurunnitu is our comrade", derived from the name of the goddess Kurunnītu, and the Akkadian elements tappa-um ("comrade") and ni ("our").