Names Categorized "medieval"

This is a list of names in which the categories include medieval.
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AALISfMedieval French
Old French form of ALICE.
ACHARDmOld Norman
Medieval Norman form of EKKEHARD.
ADDY (2)mMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of ADAM.
AGNESfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
ALBERTmEnglish, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALDITHfMedieval English
Middle English form of EALDGYÐ.
ALDOUSmEnglish (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
ALDUSm & fMedieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ALISONfEnglish, French
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE). It was common in England, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in England in the 20th century via Scotland. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
ALIXfFrench
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALOYSmMedieval Occitan
Medieval Occitan form of LOUIS.
AMABELfEnglish (Rare)
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS.
AMÉmMedieval French
Old French form of AIMÉ.
AMÉEfMedieval French
Old French form of AIMÉE.
AMICEfMedieval English
Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning "friend". This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon.
AMISmMedieval English, Medieval French
Medieval name, a masculine form of AMICE. It appears in the medieval French poem 'Amis and Amiles', about two friends who make sacrifices for one another.
ANNABELfEnglish, Dutch
Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ANNISfEnglish
Medieval English form of AGNES.
ANNORAfEnglish (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ARABELLAfEnglish
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARLOTTOmMedieval Italian
Medieval Italian name, recorded in Latin as Arlotus. It is possibly from Old French herlot meaning "vagabond, tramp".
AUDREYfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AVISfEnglish
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AXELmDanish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM.
BARBARAfEnglish, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BATEmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW.
BERISLAVmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements birati "to take, to gather" (in an inflected form) and slava "glory".
BLAZHmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic name derived from the Slavic element blagu meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BOGDANmPolish, Russian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Medieval Slavic
Means "given by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and dan "given".
BOGUMILmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOGUMIRmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOHUMÍR.
BOGUSLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOGUSŁAW.
BOLESLAVmCzech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BOLESŁAW.
BONACCORSOmItalian (Rare)
From a medieval Italian name derived from bono "good" and accorso "haste, rush, help".
BORISLAVmBulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
BORISUmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BORIS, probably ultimately of Turkic origin.
BORIVOImMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOŘIVOJ.
BOZHENAfMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOŽENA.
BOZHIDARmBulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of BOŽIDAR.
BOZHOmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BOŽO.
BRATOMILmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BRATUMIŁ.
BRATOSLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of BRATISLAV.
BRIANmEnglish, Irish, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
CASSANDRAfEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATELINEfMedieval French
Medieval French form of KATHERINE.
CECILYfEnglish
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CERIDWENfWelsh
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CHAYYIMmHebrew
Derived from the Hebrew word חַיִּים (chayyim) meaning "life". It has been used since medieval times.
CHEDOMIRmMacedonian, Medieval Slavic
Variant transcription of ČEDOMIR.
CHESTIBORmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of CZCIBOR.
CHESTIRADmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of CTIRAD.
CHESTISLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of CZESŁAW.
CHRISTABELfEnglish (Rare)
Combination of CHRISTINA and the name suffix bel. This name occurs in medieval literature, and was later used by Samuel Coleridge in his poem 'Christabel' (1800).
CICELYfEnglish
Medieval variant of CECILY.
CLARAfItalian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLAREfEnglish
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLARICEfEnglish
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CLEMENCYfEnglish (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
COLmMedieval English
Medieval short form of NICHOLAS.
COLIN (2)mEnglish
Medieval diminutive of Col, a short form of NICHOLAS.
CONSTANCEfEnglish, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CRESSIDAfLiterature
Medieval form of CHRYSEIS. Various medieval tales describe her as a woman of Troy, daughter of Calchus, who leaves her Trojan lover Troilus for the Greek hero Diomedes. Shakespeare's play 'Troilus and Cressida' (1602) was based on these tales.
CRISPIANmEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval variant of CRISPIN.
CRISPINmEnglish (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
DALIBORmCzech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
DAWmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of DAVID.
DESISLAVmBulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from Slavic elements, possibly deseti meaning "ten", combined with slava "glory".
DICK (1)mEnglish
Medieval diminutive of RICHARD. The change in the initial consonant is said to have been caused by the way the trilled Norman R was pronounced by the English.
DICUNmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of DICK (1).
DIDACUSmMedieval Spanish
Form of DIEGO found in medieval Latin records.
DIOTfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of DIONYSIA.
DMITREImMedieval Slavic
Old Slavic form of DMITRIY.
DOBROGOSTmPolish (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and gosti "guest".
DOBROMILmCzech (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and milu "gracious, dear".
DOBROSLAVmCroatian, Serbian, Czech, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and slava "glory".
DRAGOMIRmSerbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
DRAGOSLAVmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dragu meaning "precious" and slava "glory".
DRAGUTINmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAZHANmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of DRAŽEN.
DYEfMedieval English
Medieval short form of DIONYSIA.
EDA (2)fMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of EDITH.
ELENAfItalian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, Medieval Slavic
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.
ELIASmPortuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELISmSwedish, Medieval English
Swedish variant of ELIAS, as well as the Medieval English form.
ELRICmMedieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC. Both were rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ENGUERRANDmMedieval French
Medieval French form of the Germanic name Engilram, which was composed of the elements Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and hramn "raven". This was the name of several French nobles from Picardy.
ERMOmMedieval Italian
Italian diminutive of ERASMUS.
ESTIENNEmMedieval French
Medieval French form of STEPHEN.
ETHELBERTmEnglish
Middle English form of ÆÐELBERHT. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELDREDfMedieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETZELmGermanic Mythology
Form of ATTILA used in the medieval German saga the 'Nibelungenlied'. In the story Etzel is a fictional version of Attila the Hun.
EUDESmMedieval French
Old French form of Audo (see OTTO). This was the name of an 8th-century French saint. It was also borne by a 9th-century French king.
EVEfEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
EVERARDmEnglish (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
FLORENCEf & mEnglish, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
GARSEAmMedieval Spanish
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the Basque word hartz meaning "bear". This was the name of several medieval kings of Navarre and Leon.
GAVINmEnglish, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GEMMAfItalian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GEOFFROImMedieval French
Medieval French form of GEOFFREY.
GEORGEImMedieval Slavic
Old Slavic form of GEORGE.
GIDIEmMedieval French
Medieval French form of Aegidius (see GILES).
GILBERTmEnglish, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILLIANfEnglish
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
GOMESmMedieval Portuguese
Medieval Portuguese form of the Visigothic name Goma, derived from the Germanic element guma meaning "man".
GOSSEmMedieval French
Old French form of GOZZO.
GOSTISLAVmMedieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements gosti "guest" and slava "glory".
GRIGORIImRussian, Medieval Slavic
Variant transcription of GRIGORIY, as well as the usual transcription of the Old Slavic form.
GUARINmMedieval French
Norman French form of WARIN.
GUISCARDmMedieval French
Norman French form of the Norman name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr "wise" and hórðr "brave, hardy".
GWENLLIANfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and llian meaning "flaxen". This name was popular among medieval Welsh royalty. It was borne by the 14th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
HALmEnglish
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HAMOmMedieval English
Norman form of HAIMO. The Normans brought this name to Britain.
HANNmMedieval English
Medieval English form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
HARRYmEnglish
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HERRYmMedieval English
Medieval English form of HENRY. Unlike Harry, this form is no longer used.
HOPKINmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of HOB.
HUDDEmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of HUGH or possibly RICHARD.
IBBfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of ISABEL.
IDONEAfEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century.
IDONYfEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA.
ISABELLAfItalian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISEULTfArthurian Romance
Medieval variant of ISOLDE.
ISEUTfMedieval English
Medieval form of ISOLDE.
JACKmEnglish
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
JAKEmEnglish
Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.
JAN (3)mMedieval English
Medieval English form of JOHN, derived from the Old French form Jehan.
JANETfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of JANE.
JANKINmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of JAN (3).
JEHANmMedieval French
Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JEHANNEfMedieval French
Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JENNYfEnglish, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JIMmEnglish
Medieval diminutive of JAMES.
JOAN (1)fEnglish
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.... [more]
JOCOSAfMedieval English
Medieval variant of JOYCE, influenced by the Latin word iocosus or jocosus "merry, playful".
JOHANNEfFrench, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French
French, Danish and Norwegian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JOLYONmEnglish (Rare)
Medieval form of JULIAN. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his 'Forsyte Saga' novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
JOSCELINmOld Norman
Norman form of JOCELYN.
JOSSEmFrench (Rare), Medieval French
French form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JOYCEf & mEnglish
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
JUDDmEnglish, Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of JORDAN. Modern use of this name is inspired by the surname that was derived from the medieval name.
JURIANmMedieval Low German
Medieval Low German form of GEORGE.
KENELMmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KINBOROUGHfMedieval English
Middle English form of CYNEBURG.
KRASIMIRmBulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements krasa "beauty, adornment" and miru "peace, world".
KRESIMIRmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of KREŠIMIR.
KYRILUmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of CYRIL.
LARKINmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LAWmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LAYLAfArabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LEWISmEnglish
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.
LORENCIOmMedieval Spanish
Archaic Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LUCYfEnglish
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LUDOVICmFrench
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
LYUDMILmBulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Bulgarian masculine form of LUDMILA.
LYUDMILAfRussian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Russian and Bulgarian form of LUDMILA. This was the name of a character in Aleksandr Pushkin's poem 'Ruslan and Lyudmila' (1820).
MACK (2)mMedieval English
Medieval short form of MAGNUS, brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers.
MALLEfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARY.
MARGERYfEnglish
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARJORIEfEnglish
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MATTY (2)fMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARTHA.
MAUDfEnglish, French, Dutch
Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).
MEGGYfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MELANIEfEnglish, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.... [more]
MILITSAfMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MILICA.
MILIVOJmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious" and voji "soldier".
MILODRAGmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of MIODRAG.
MILOGOSTmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MIŁOGOST.
MILOSHmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MILOŠ.
MILOSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and slava "glory".
MIRABELLEfFrench (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIRCHEmMacedonian, Medieval Slavic
Variant transcription of MIRČE.
MIROSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MISLAVmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element mysli "thought" or moji "my" combined with slava "glory". This was the name of a 9th-century duke of Croatia, also called Mojslav.
MOLLEfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARY.
MORRISmEnglish, Medieval English
Usual medieval form of MAURICE.
MSTISLAVmCzech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Means "vengeance and glory" from the Slavic elements misti "vengeance" and slava "glory".
MUNDZUKmMedieval Turkic
Old Turkic form of BENDEGÚZ.
MURIELfEnglish, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
NANCYfEnglish
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NEILmIrish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NELLfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
NICOL (1)mScottish, Medieval English
Medieval English and Scottish form of NICHOLAS. This was the middle name of character in the novel 'Rob Roy' (1817) by Sir Walter Scott.
NIGELmEnglish
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).
NINOSLAVmSerbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
From a Slavic element, possibly nyni "now", combined with slava "glory".
NOËLmFrench
Means "Christmas" in French. In the Middle Ages it was used for children born on the holiday. A famous bearer was the English playwright and composer Noël Coward (1899-1973).
NOLLmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of OLIVER.
NUÑOmMedieval Spanish
Spanish form of NUNO.
NUNOmPortuguese, Medieval Portuguese
Medieval Portuguese and Spanish name, possibly from Latin nonus "ninth" or nunnus "grandfather". Saint Nuno was a 14th-century Portuguese general who defeated a Castilian invasion.
ODEmMedieval English
Medieval English form of Odo (see OTTO).
ONFROImMedieval French
Norman French form of HUMPHREY.
PATEmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of PATRICK.
PETRUCCIOmMedieval Italian
Medieval diminutive of PIETRO.
PIERSmEnglish (British), Medieval French
Medieval form of PETER. This was the name of the main character in the 14th-century poem 'Piers Plowman' by William Langland.
POLLYfEnglish
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PREMISLAVmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of PRZEMYSŁAW.
PREMYSLmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of PŘEMYSL.
PRIDBJØRNmOld Danish
Old Danish form of PREBEN.
PRIDBORmMedieval Slavic
Earlier Slavic form of PREBEN.
PRUDENCEf & mEnglish, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
RADOMILmCzech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rad "happy, willing" and milu "gracious, dear".
RADOMIRmSerbian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
RADOVANmSlovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
RANDELmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of RANDOLF and other names beginning with the Germanic element rand meaning "rim (of a shield)".
RATIMIRmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rati meaning "war, battle" and miru meaning "peace, world".
RAYMONDmEnglish, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
REYNARDmEnglish (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
REYNOLDmEnglish
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
ROBINm & fEnglish, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROHESEfMedieval English
Norman French form of HRODOHAIDIS.
ROHESIAfMedieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see ROSE).
ROLANDmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROSALINfEnglish (Rare)
Medieval variant of ROSALIND.
ROSALINEfEnglish
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROSAMONDfEnglish
Variant of ROSAMUND, in use since the Middle Ages.
ROSTISLAVmRussian, Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
ROULmMedieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of ROLF.
ROWLANDmEnglish
Medieval variant of ROLAND.
ROYSEfMedieval English
Medieval variant of ROSE.
SAMOmSlovene, Medieval Slavic
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of a 7th-century ruler of the Slavs, who established a kingdom including parts of modern Slovenia, Austria, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic. He was possibly of Frankish origin.
SIBYLfEnglish
From Greek Σιβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were ten female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel 'Sybil' (1845).
SIDONYfEnglish (Archaic)
Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This name was in use in the Middle Ages, when it became associated with the word sindon (of Greek origin) meaning "linen", a reference to the Shroud of Turin.
SLAVITSAfMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of SLAVICA.
SLAVOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Croatian and Serbian form of SŁAWOMIR.
SOBESLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of SOBIESŁAW.
SOPHIAfEnglish, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
STACEm & fMedieval English, English
Medieval short form of EUSTACE. As a modern name it is typically a short form of STACY.
STANIMIRmBulgarian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani "stand, become" and miru "peace, world".
STANISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani meaning "stand, become" combined with slava meaning "glory".
STEVENmEnglish, Dutch
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.
STUREmSwedish, Medieval Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse stura "to be contrary". This was the name of three viceroys of Sweden.
SVETOPOLKmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of SVYATOPOLK.
SYBILfEnglish
Variant of SIBYL. This spelling variation has existed since the Middle Ages.
TANCREDmOld Norman
Norman form of a Germanic name meaning "thought and counsel", derived from the elements thank "thought" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a leader of the First Crusade, described by Torquato Tasso in his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580).
TEMÜRmMedieval Turkic
Old Turkic form of TIMUR.
TENNEYmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of DENIS.
TIELOmMedieval German
Earlier form of TILO.
TIFFANYfEnglish
Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.
TIKHOMIRmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of TIHOMIR.
TOBYm & fEnglish
Medieval form of TOBIAS. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
TOMISLAVmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Probably derived from the Slavic element tomiti meaning "torture" combined with slava meaning "glory". This was the name of the first king of Croatia (10th century).
TRISTANmWelsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TRISTRAMmEnglish (British)
Medieval English form of TRISTAN.
TYBALTmLiterature
Medieval form of THEOBALD. This is the name of a cousin of Juliet killed by Romeo in Shakespeare's drama 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
UNDINEfLiterature
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.
VASILIImMedieval Slavic
Old Slavic form of BASIL (1).
VAUQUELINmMedieval French
Old French form of the Germanic name Walchelin, derived from the element walha meaning "foreign".
VECHESLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of VÁCLAV.
VELASCOmMedieval Spanish
Medieval Spanish form of VASCO.
VELIMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements veli "great" and miru "peace, world".
VENCESLAUSmMedieval Czech (Latinized)
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
VITOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vit "master, lord" and miru "peace, world".
VLADmRomanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Old short form of VLADISLAV and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.
VLADIMERUmMedieval Slavic
Church Slavic form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMIRmRussian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADISLAVmRussian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLASTIMIRmSerbian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and miru meaning "peace, world".
VLASTISLAVmCzech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and slava "glory". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VOITSEKHmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of WOJCIECH.
VOLODIMERUmMedieval Slavic
Old East Slavic form of VLADIMIR.
VOLODISLAVUmMedieval Slavic
Old East Slavic form of VLADISLAV.
VRATISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vratiti "to return" and slava "glory". This was the name of two dukes of Bohemia. The city of Wrocław in Poland is named after the first.
VSEVOLODmRussian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements visi "all" and vladeti "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev.
WALKERmEnglish
From an English surname which referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it. The word ultimately derives from Old English wealcan "to walk".
WATmEnglish
Medieval short form of WALTER.
WYMONDmMedieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
WYOTmMedieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigheard, composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
XIMENOmMedieval Spanish
Medieval Spanish or Basque name of uncertain meaning. It is possibly a form of SIMON (1), though it may in fact derive from Basque seme meaning "son".