Little-Beeps's Personal Name List

AARON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Ααρων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AR-ən (English), ER-ən (English)

From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon) which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses and the first high priest of the Israelites. He acted as a spokesman for his brother, and carried a miraculous rod. As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

ABEDNEGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֲבֵד־נְגוֹ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ə-BED-ni-go (English)

Means "servant of Nebo" in Akkadian, Nebo being the Babylonian god of wisdom. In the Old Testament, Abednego is the Babylonian name given to Azariah, one of the three men cast into a blazing furnace but saved from harm by God.

ABSALOM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְשָׁלוֹם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AB-sə-lahm (English)

From the Hebrew name אַבְשָׁלוֹם ('Avshalom) which meant "my father is peace". In the Old Testament he is a son of King David who leads a revolt against his father. While fleeing on the back of a mule he got his head caught in a tree and was killed by Joab.

ADALIA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֲדַלְיָא (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: a-də-LIE-ə (English), ə-DAH-lee-ə (English)

Possibly means "YAHWEH is just" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Haman.

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ADONIJAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֲדֹנִיָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ad-ə-NIE-jə (English)

Means "my lord is YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is the name of one of King David's sons in the Old Testament.

ADONIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αδωνις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ə-DAH-nəs (English), ə-DO-nəs (English)

From the Semitic Adonai, which means "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from various Semitic traditions, hence the Semitic origins of the name.

ADORINDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: ah-do-REEN-dah

Means "adorable" in Esperanto.

AGATHANGELOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Greek

Other Scripts: Αγαθαγγελος (Ancient Greek)

Means "bearer of good news", derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) "good" and αγγελος (angelos) "messenger, angel". Saint Agathangelus of Rome was a 4th-century deacon who was martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian.

AGNIESZKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: ahg-NYESH-kah

Polish form of AGNES

AIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Literature

Other Scripts: عائدة (Arabic)

Pronounced: ah-EE-də (English)

Variant of AYDA. This name was used in Verdi's opera 'Aida' (1871), where it belongs to an Ethiopian princess held captive in Egypt.

AIDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: AY-dən

Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.

AINSLIE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AYNZ-lee

Variant of AINSLEY

ALAIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: al-EN

French form of ALAN

ALASDAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Scottish form of ALEXANDER

ALESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ah-LES-sah

Short form of ALESSANDRA

ALEXEI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian

Other Scripts: Алексей (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-lyek-SYAY (Russian), ah-leek-SYAY (Russian)

Variant transcription of ALEKSEY

ALGERNON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-jər-nahn

Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendent of William de Percy).

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALLEGRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)

Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), ahl-LE-grah (Italian)

Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

ALLEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: AL-ən (English)

Variant of ALAN. A famous bearer of this name was Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997), an American beat poet. Another is the American film director and actor Woody Allen (1935-), who took the stage name Allen from his real first name.

ALOYSIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: al-ə-WISH-əs (English), ah-LOI-zee-uws (German), ah-lo-EE-see-us (Dutch)

Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.

ALPHAEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: al-FEE-əs (English)

From Αλφαιος (Alphaios), the Greek form of a Hebrew name that meant "changing". In the New Testament this is the name of the fathers of the apostles James and Levi.

ALTAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.

AMADEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs (English), ahm-ə-DEE-əs (English)

Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.

AMARANTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek αμαραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Αμαραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

ANASTASIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αναστασια (Greek), Анастасия (Russian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian)

Pronounced: ah-nah-stah-SEE-yah (Russian), a-nə-STAY-zhə (English), a-nə-STAS-yə (English), ah-nahs-TAH-syah (Spanish), ah-nahs-TAH-zyah (Italian)

Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

ANASTASIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αναστασιος (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of the Greek name Αναστασιος (Anastasios) which meant "resurrection" from Greek αναστασις (anastasis) (composed of the elements ανα (ana) "up" and στασις (stasis) "standing"). This was the name of numerous early saints and martyrs, including a 7th-century monk and writer from Alexandria who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.

ANATOLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of ANATOLIUS

ANATOLIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ανατολιος (Ancient Greek)

From the Greek Ανατολιος (Anatolios), derived from ανατολη (anatole) meaning "sunrise". Saint Anatolius was a 3rd-century philosopher from Alexandria.

ANDREI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Андрей (Russian, Bulgarian), Андреи (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: ahn-DRYAY (Russian)

Romanian form of ANDREW, and a variant Russian and Bulgarian transcription of ANDREY.

ANDRONIKOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Ανδρονικος (Ancient Greek)

Means "victory of a man" from Greek ανδρος (andros) "of a man" and νικη (nike) "victory". The Latinized form of this name, Andronicus, was used by Shakespeare in his play 'Titus Andronicus' (1593).

ANICETUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ανικητος (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of the Greek name Ανικητος (Aniketos), meaning "unconquerable". This was the name of an early pope.

ANIKETOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Ανικητος (Greek)

Greek form of ANICETUS

ANINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: ah-NEE-nah

Diminutive of ANNA

ANNABELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)

Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.

ANNELIESE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch

Pronounced: ah-ne-LEE-zə (German), ahn-nə-LEE-sə (Dutch)

Combination of ANNA and LIESE

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

ARAM (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Kurdish

Means "calm" in Kurdish.

ARAMINTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy 'The Old Bachelor' (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy 'The Confederacy' (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.

ARAMIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

The surname of one of the musketeers in 'The Three Musketeers' (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits.

ARELI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אַרְאֵלִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ay-REE-lie (English)

Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.

ARIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə

Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century.

ARIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֲרִיאֵל (Hebrew), Αριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AR-ee-əl (English), ER-ee-əl (English), AY-ree-əl (English)

Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).

ARISTIDES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Spanish, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Αριστειδης (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ah-ree-STEE-dhes (Spanish), ə-reesh-TEE-dəsh (Portuguese), ə-reesh-CHEE-jəsh (Brazilian Portuguese)

From the Greek Αριστειδης (Aristeides) which meant "the best kind", derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and ειδος (eidos) "kind, type". This name was borne by the 5th-century BC Athenian statesman Aristides the Just, who was renowned for his integrity. It was also the name of a 2nd-century saint.

ARKADIOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αρκαδιος (Ancient Greek)

From an ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia". Arcadia was a region in Greece, its name deriving from αρκτος (arktos) "bear". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

ASHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)

Pronounced: A-shər (English)

Means "happy" or "blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob and Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

ASHLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ASH-lee

From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

ASTRAEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αστραια (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.

ASTRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French

Pronounced: AH-strid (Swedish), AH-stree (Norwegian), AHS-trit (German)

Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.

ASTROPHEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek αστηρ (aster) "star" and φιλος (philos) "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'.

ATHANASIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αθανασιος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ath-ə-NAY-shəs (English)

From the Greek name Αθανασιος (Athanasios), which meant "immortal" from Greek α, a negative prefix, combined with θανατος (thanatos) "death". Saint Athanasius was a 4th-century bishop of Alexandria who strongly opposed Arianism.

ATTICUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).

AUBERON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: O-bər-ahn

Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.

AUBREY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWB-ree

Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, probably because of its similarity to Audrey.

AUGUSTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-gəs-teen, ə-GUS-tin

From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.

AURELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Romanian, Polish

Pronounced: ow-RE-lyah (Italian), ow-REL-yah (Polish)

Feminine form of AURELIUS

AVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: av-ə-LEEN

From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.

AVILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), Ancient Germanic

Derived from the Germanic element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This name is also given in honour of the 16th-century mystic Saint Teresa of Ávila, Ávila being the name of the town in Spain where she was born.

AVRAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אַבְרָם (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of ABRAHAM

AXEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German

Pronounced: AHK-sel (German)

Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM

AYLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֵלָה (Hebrew)

Variant transcription of ELAH

AZAREL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֲזַרְאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "God has helped" in Hebrew. This was the name of several minor Old Testament characters.

AZARIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֲזַרְיָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: az-ə-RIE-ə (English)

Means "YAHWEH has helped" in Hebrew. This was the name of several Old Testament characters including of one of the three men the Babylonian king ordered cast into a fiery furnace. His Babylonian name was Abednego.

AZRAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Variant of AZRIEL. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Muslim tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.

AZRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֲזְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "help of God", derived from Hebrew עָזַר ('azar) "help" and אֵל ('el) "God". This was the name of three minor characters in the Old Testament.

BABAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Pakistani, Urdu

Other Scripts: بابر (Urdu)

Variant transcription of BABUR

BALDASSARE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of BALTHAZAR

BALTAZAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Variant of BALTHAZAR

BARAK (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: בָּרָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: BER-ək (English), BAR-ək (English)

Means "lightning" in Hebrew. This is the name of a military commander in the Old Testament.

BARLAAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Meaning unknown. In Christian legends Barlaam (recorded as Greek Βαρλααμ) was a 3rd-century hermit who converted Josaphat, the son of an Indian king, to Christianity. The story is based on that of the Buddha. This name was also borne by two saints.

BARNABAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Βαρναβας (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: BAHR-nah-bahs (German), BAHR-nə-bəs (English)

Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement". As an English name, it came into occasional use after the 12th century.

BARNABY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee

Medieval English form of BARNABAS

BARTEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: BAHR-təl

Dutch diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW

BARTHOLOMEW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo (English)

From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle also known as Nathaniel. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.

BASILIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: bah-ZEE-lyo (Italian), bah-SEE-lyo (Spanish)

Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1)

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BEDROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Armenian

Other Scripts: Պետրոս (Armenian)

Western Armenian transcription of PETROS

BÉLA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: BAY-law

The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from a Slavic word meaning "white" or a Hungarian word meaning "within". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.

BENAIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: בְּנָיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: bi-NIE-ə (English), bi-NAY-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name בְּנָיָהוּ (Benayahu) meaning "YAHWEH has built". This was the name of numerous Old Testament characters.

BENEDETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Italian feminine form of BENEDICT

BENEDICT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEN-ə-dikt

From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American defector Benedict Arnold (1741-1801).

BENEDICTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Feminine form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).

BENSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEN-sən

From a surname which originally meant "son of BENEDICT".

BERTALAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Hungarian form of BARTHOLOMEW

BERTRANDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of BERTRAND

BIANCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Romanian

Pronounced: BYAHN-kah (Romanian)

Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).

BLAISE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: BLEZ

From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BONAVENTURA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: bo-nah-ven-TOO-rah

Means "good fortune" in Italian. Saint Bonaventura was a 13th-century Franciscan monk who is considered a Doctor of the Church.

BONIFACE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English (Rare)

Pronounced: BAWN-ə-fays (English), BAWN-ə-fəs (English)

From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.

BRIGITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Slovene, Croatian, Latvian

Slovene, Croatian and Latvian form of BRIDGET

CADOC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.

CAELESTIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Late Latin name which meant "of the sky, heavenly".

CALIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: ?

Possibly from Latin calix meaning "wine cup".

CAMERON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: KAM-rən (English), KAM-ə-rən (English)

From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".

CASPIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)

Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CASSIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English

Pronounced: KASH-əs (English), KAS-ee-əs (English)

Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).

CATO (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendents, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.

CECIL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SEE-səl, SES-əl

From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.

CÉCILE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch

Pronounced: say-SEEL (French)

French form of CECILIA

CECILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, German

Pronounced: sə-SEE-lee-ə (English), sə-SEEL-yə (English), che-CHEE-lyah (Italian), the-THEE-lyah (Spanish), se-SEE-lyah (Latin American Spanish)

Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CEDRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SED-rik

Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th-century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).

CELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: SEEL-yə (English), SEE-lee-ə (English), THE-lyah (Spanish), SE-lyah (Latin American Spanish), CHE-lyah (Italian)

Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.

CELIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: CHE-lyo (Italian), THE-lyo (Spanish), SE-lyo (Latin American Spanish), SE-lyoo (Portuguese)

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAELIUS

CESARINO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: che-sah-REE-no

Diminutive of CESARE

CHARITON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Χαριτων (Ancient Greek)

Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.

CHARLOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: shar-LOT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shahr-LAW-tə (German), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)

French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Bronte sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHRYSANTHOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Χρυσανθος (Greek)

Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσος (chrysos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.

CICERO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Pronounced: SIS-ə-ro (English)

Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.

CIRINO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: chee-REE-no (Italian), thee-REE-no (Spanish), see-REE-no (Latin American Spanish)

Diminutive of CIRO

CIRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: CHEE-ro (Italian), THEE-ro (Spanish), SEE-ro (Latin American Spanish)

Italian and Spanish form of CYRUS

CLEMENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KLE-mənt

English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius) which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.

COLM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Variant of COLUM

CONCETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: kon-CHET-tah

Italian cognate of CONCEPCIÓN

CONCORDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Pronounced: kən-KAWR-dee-ə (English)

Means "harmony" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of harmony and peace.

CONRAD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: KAHN-rad (English), KAWN-raht (German)

Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.

CONSTANTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Constantius, which was itself derived from CONSTANS.

CORALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-bin

From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CORENTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Breton, French

Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.

CORMAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Means "son of defilement" from Gaelic corb "defilement" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.

CORNELIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical

Pronounced: kər-NEE-lee-əs (English), kawr-NAY-lee-us (Dutch), kawr-NE-lee-uws (German)

Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.

CORWIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-win

From an English surname, perhaps derived from Old French cordoan "leather".

COSIMO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: KAW-zee-maw, KO-zi-mo

Italian variant of COSMAS. A famous bearer was Cosimo de' Medici, the 15th-century founder of Medici rule in Florence, who was a patron of the Renaissance and a successful merchant. Other members of the Medici family have also borne this name.

COSTANZO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of CONSTANS

COURTNEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KORT-nee

From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.

CYPRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: SIP-ree-ən (English)

From the Roman family name Cyprianus which meant "from Cyprus" in Latin. Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.

CYRANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: SIR-ə-no (English)

Possibly derived from the name of the ancient Greek city of Cyrene, which was located in North Africa. Edmond Rostand used this name in his play 'Cyrano de Bergerac' (1897). He based his character upon a real person, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, a French satirist of the 17th century.

DAISUKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 大輔 (Japanese)

From Japanese 大 (dai) "large, great" and 輔 (suke) "help".

DAMIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, Dutch

Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən (English), DAHM-yahn (Polish)

From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαω (damao) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

D'ARTAGNAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwestern France. This was the name of a character in the novel 'The Three Musketeers' (1884) by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel D'Artagnan is an aspiring musketeer who first duels with the three title characters and then becomes their friend.

DASHIELL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961), it is an Anglicized form of his mother's surname De Chiel, which is of unknown meaning.

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DEMETRIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Δημητριος (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of the Greek name Δημητριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess DEMETER (1). Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.

DEODATUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Variant of ADEODATUS or DEUSDEDIT. This name was borne by several saints.

DESIDERIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Italian and Spanish form of DESIDERIUS

DIDIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: deed-YAY

French form of DESIDERIO

DIEDERIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch

Pronounced: DEE-də-rik

Dutch form of THEODORIC

DIETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: DEE-ter

Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements þeud "people" and hari "army".

DIETRICH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: DEET-rikh

German form of THEODORIC

DIMITRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, French

Other Scripts: Димитрий (Russian)

Pronounced: dee-MEE-tree (Russian)

Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.

DINAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: דִּינָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: DIE-nə (English)

Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English given name since after the Protestant Reformation.

DIODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of DIODORUS

DOV

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: דּוֹב (Hebrew)

Pronounced: DOV

Means "bear" in Hebrew.

EBENEZER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֶבֶן הָעָזֶר (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: eb-ə-NEE-zər (English)

Means "stone of help" in Hebrew. This was the name of a monument erected by Samuel in the Old Testament. Charles Dickens used it for the miserly character Ebenezer Scrooge in his novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).

ECKHARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: EK-hahrt

Variant of EKKEHARD

EDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Variant of AIDAN

EDOM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱדוֹם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EE-dəm (English)

Means "red" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Esau is given the name Edom because he trades his birthright for a helping of red broth.

EITAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֵיתָן (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of ETHAN

ELAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֵילָם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EE-ləm (English)

Meaning unknown. This was the name of several characters in the Old Testament, including a son of Shem who was the ancestor of the Elamite peoples.

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEAZAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶלְעָזָר (Ancient Hebrew), Ελεαζαρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: el-ee-AY-zər (English)

From the Hebrew name אֶלְעָזָר ('El'azar) meaning "my God has helped". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the sons of Aaron.

ELEK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Hungarian form of ALEXIS

ELIAKIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֶלְיָקִים (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "God rises" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the master of Hezekiah's household.

ELIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ηλιας (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEE-ahs (German), i-LIE-əs (English), ee-LIE-əs (English)

Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.

ELIEZER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֱלִיעֶזֶר (Hebrew), Ελιεζερ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: el-ie-EE-zər (English)

From Hebrew אֱלִיעֶזֶר ('Eli'ezer) meaning "my God is help". In the Old Testament this is the name of both a servant of Abraham and one of the sons of Moses (see Exodus 18:4 for an explanation of the significance of the name).

ELIJAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ (Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIE-jə (English), i-LIE-zhə (English)

From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH". Elijah was a Hebrew prophet of the 9th century BC, during the reign of King Ahab and his queen, Jezebel. The two Books of Kings in the Old Testament tell of his exploits, which culminate with him being carried to heaven in a chariot of fire.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELIOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹר (Hebrew)

Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.

ELIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Feminine form of ELIOR

ELIPHELET

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱלִיפֶלֶט (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIF-ə-let (English), ee-LIF-ə-let (English)

Means "God is release" in Hebrew. This is the name of several people in the Old Testament including a son of David.

ELISHA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלִישַׁע (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIE-shə (English), ee-LIE-shə (English)

From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". In the Old Testament, Elisha is the prophet who is the successor of Elijah.

ELIZAVETA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Елизавета (Russian)

Pronounced: ye-lee-zah-VYE-tah, ee-lee-zah-VYE-tah

Variant transcription of YELIZAVETA

ELKANAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלְקָנָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: el-KAYN-ə (English)

Means "God has purchased" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Samuel.

ELLIOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.

ELLIS (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-is

From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.

ELŻBIETA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: elzh-BYE-tah

Polish form of ELIZABETH

EMANUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Portuguese, Czech, Croatian

Pronounced: e-MAH-nuw-el (German)

Form of EMMANUEL

ÉMERIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of EMMERICH

EMERSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ər-sən

From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

EMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: EM-ə (English), E-mah (German)

Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

EMMALINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen

Variant of EMMELINE

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

EMMETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-it

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.

ENNIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

From the name of a town in Ireland.

ENOCH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: חֲנוֹך (Ancient Hebrew), Ενωχ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-nək (English)

From the Hebrew name חֲנוֹך (Chanokh) meaning "dedicated". In Genesis in the Old Testament this is the name of both the son of Cain and the father of Methuselah, and the supposed author of the apocryphal Books of Enoch.

ENOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֱנוֹשׁ (Ancient Hebrew), Ενως (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-nahs (English)

Form of ENOSH used in many versions of the Old Testament.

EPAPHRAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Επαφρας (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EP-ə-fras (English)

Derived from Greek επαφρος (epaphros) meaning "foamy". In the New Testament this is the name of one of Paul's co-workers.

EPAPHRODITOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Επαφροδιτος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-paf-rə-DIE-təs (English)

Means "lovely, charming", derived from Greek επι (epi) "on" combined with the name of the Greek love goddess APHRODITE.

EPHRAIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶפְרָיִם (Hebrew), Εφραιμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-free-im (English), EE-frəm (English), E-free-im (English), E-frəm (English)

From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) which meant "fruitful". In the Old Testament, Ephraim is a son of Joseph and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

EPONINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: EP-ə-neen (English)

Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.

ERAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עֵירָן (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "watchful, vigilant" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a grandson of Ephraim.

ERASMUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ερασμος (Ancient Greek)

Derived from Greek ερασμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.

ERASTUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Εραστος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: i-RAS-təs (English)

Latinized form of the Greek name Εραστος (Erastos) meaning "beloved". This was the name of an assistant of Paul mentioned in Acts and two epistles in the New Testament.

ERCOLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ER-ko-le

Italian form of HERCULES

EROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ερως (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ER-aws (English)

Means "love" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was a young god, the son of Aphrodite, who was armed with arrows that caused the victim to fall in love.

ESMÉ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: es-MAY (Dutch)

Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.

ESTHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר (Hebrew), Εσθηρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ES-tər (English, Dutch), es-TER (French)

Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia who saved the Jews of the realm from extermination. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of president Grover Cleveland.

ÉTIENNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ay-TYEN (French), ay-TSYEN (Quebec French)

French form of STEPHEN

ETTORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ET-to-re

Italian form of HECTOR

EUAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of EOGHAN

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant Russian transcription of YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVANDER (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)

Variant of Evandrus, Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros) which meant "good man", derived from Greek ευ "good" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847).

EVANGELOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ευαγγελος (Greek)

Means "good messenger", derived from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελος (angelos) "messenger".

EVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EEV (English), EV (French)

From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. She gave the forbidden fruit to Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EVELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Elaborated form of EVA

EVERARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements eber "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.

EVERETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EV-ə-rit, EV-rit

From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.

EVREN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Turkish

Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish.

EWAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of EOGHAN

EZEKIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl (English), i-ZEE-kyəl (English)

From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God strengthens". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.

EZIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: E-tsyo

Italian form of AETIUS

EZRA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EZ-rə (English)

Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.

FABIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, History

Pronounced: FAH-bee-ahn (German, Dutch), FAH-byahn (Polish), FAY-bee-ən (English)

From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.

FABIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Roman family name which was derived from Latin faba "bean". Quintus Fabius Maximus was the Roman general who used delaying tactics to halt the invasion of Hannibal in the 3rd century BC.

FABRICE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: fa-BREES

French form of the Roman family name Fabricius, which was derived from Latin faber "craftsman". Gaius Fabricius Luscinus was a 3rd-century BC Roman general and statesman.

FABRIZIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of Fabricius (see FABRICE).

FANTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). The name was given to her by a passerby who found the young orphan on the street. Hugo may have intended it to be a derivative of the French word enfant "child".

FARIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Bosnian

Other Scripts: فارس (Arabic)

Means "knight" in Arabic.

FARON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

From a French surname which was derived from the Germanic given name Faro.

FARRAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

From an English surname which was derived from Old French ferrant meaning "iron grey".

FAYE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAY

Variant of FAY

FEIVEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Yiddish

Other Scripts: פַײבֶֿעל, פַײוֶעל (Yiddish)

Diminutive of FEIBUSH

FELIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: FE-liks (German), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)

From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FENTON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FEN-tən

From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "marsh town" in Old English.

FEROZE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Pakistani, Urdu

Other Scripts: فیروز (Urdu)

Variant transcription of FEROZ

FERRAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Catalan

Catalan form of FERDINAND

FINOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Anglicized form of FIONNUALA

FINTAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: FIN-tan (Irish)

Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.

FIONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: fee-O-nə

Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).

FIORELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: fyo-REL-lah

From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.

FIRENZE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Various

From the name of an Italian city, commonly called Florence in English.

FIROZ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Iranian

Other Scripts: فیروز (Persian)

Variant transcription of FIRUZ

FIRUZ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Iranian, Tajik

Other Scripts: فیروز (Persian), Фирӯз (Tajik)

Means "successful" in Persian. A famous bearer was the Indian ruler Firuz Shah Tughlaq who constructed many buildings in Dehli in the 14th century.

FLAVIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Roman family name which meant "golden" or "yellow-haired" from Latin flavus "yellow, golden". Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine.

FLEUR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)

Pronounced: FLUUR (French, Dutch), FLUR (English)

Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).

FLORIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, French

Pronounced: FLO-ree-ahn (German), FLAWR-yahn (Polish)

From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.

FLORIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian

Romanian form of FLORINUS

FRANCIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: FRANT-səs (English)

English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman". This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595). In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls.

FRISO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Frisian

Refers to a member of the ethnic group, the Frisians, a Germanic tribe of northwest Europe. Friesland in the Netherlands is named for them.

GAMALIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: גַּמְלִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: gə-MAY-lee-əl (English)

Means "benefit of God" in Hebrew. In Acts in the New Testament he is a teacher of Saint Paul.

GEORGIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: jor-JYAH-nə, jor-JAY-nə

Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use since the 18th century.

GERRIT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, Frisian

Pronounced: KHER-rit (Dutch)

Dutch and Frisian form of GERARD

GERSHOM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: גֵּרְשֹׁם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: GUR-shahm (English)

Probably means "exile" in Hebrew, though the Bible explains that it derives from גֵּר שָׁם (ger sham) meaning "a stranger there". This is the name of a son of Moses in the Old Testament.

GIAMBATTISTA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahm-baht-TEE-stah

Combination of GIANNI and BATTISTA, given in honour of Saint John the Baptist.

GIANFRANCO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahn-FRAHN-ko

Combination of GIANNI and FRANCO (2)

GIANLUCA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahn-LOO-kah

Combination of GIANNI and LUCA (1)

GIANLUIGI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahn-loo-EE-gee

Combination of GIANNI and LUIGI

GIANMARCO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahn-MAHR-ko

Combination of GIANNI and MARCO

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GORDON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: GAWR-dən

From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.

GOTTFRIED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: GAWT-freet

German form of GODFREY. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Gottfried von Strassburg and the German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), one of the inventors of calculus.

GREGORY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GREG-ə-ree

English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It was not used in England, however, until after the Norman conquest. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

GRIFFIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRIF-in

Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).

HECTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance

Other Scripts: ‘Εκτωρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: HEK-tər (English)

Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It was historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

HEIDI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English

Pronounced: HIE-dee (German, English), HAY-dee (Finnish)

German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch)

Latinate form of HELEN

HENDRIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, German, Estonian

Pronounced: HEN-drik (Dutch, German)

Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY

HENRIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian

Other Scripts: Հենրիկ (Armenian)

Pronounced: HEN-rik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German)

Form of HENRY

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HILARIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Roman name which was derived from Latin hilaris meaning "cheerful". Alternatively, it could be derived from the Greek name ‘Ιλαρος (Hilaros) also meaning "cheerful" (the Greek word ‘ιλαρος was the source of the Latin word hilaris). Saint Hilarius was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Poitiers. This was also the name of a 5th-century pope.

HOLLIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHL-is

From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.

HUGH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HYOO

From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.

IAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: EE-ən (English)

Modern Scottish form of JOHN

IBRAHIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إبراهيم (Arabic)

Arabic form of ABRAHAM

ILAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אִילָן (Hebrew)

Means "tree" in Hebrew.

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch)

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German

Pronounced: ee-sah-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BEL (French), ee-zah-BEL (German)

Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISAIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ie-ZAY-ə (English), ie-ZIE-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Yesha'yahu) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". Isaiah is a major prophet of the Old Testament, supposedly the author of the Book of Isaiah. He was from Jerusalem and probably lived in the 8th century BC. As an English Christian name, Isaiah was first used after the Protestant Reformation.

ISIDORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Georgian, Jewish

Other Scripts: ისიდორე (Georgian)

Pronounced: IZ-i-dawr (English), ee-zee-DOR (French)

From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.

Though it has never been popular in the English-speaking world among Christians, it has historically been a common name for Jews, who have used it as an Americanized form of names such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah.

ISOLDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-du (German)

The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice" and hild "battle".

In Arthurian legend she was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. She became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

IVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian, English

Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian, Ukrainian), IE-vən (English)

Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.

JACHIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יָכִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAY-kin (English)

Means "he establishes" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Simeon in the Old Testament.

JACQUES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ZHAHK

French form of JACOB (or JAMES).

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JEAN-BAPTISTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Combination of JEAN (1) and BAPTISTE, referring to Saint John the Baptist.

JEREMIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: יִרְמְיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jer-ə-MIE-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) which meant "YAHWEH has uplifted". This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and (supposedly) the Book of Lamentations. He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC. In England, though the vernacular form Jeremy had been occasionally used since the 13th century, the form Jeremiah was not common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JEREMIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Means "God uplifts" in Hebrew. Jeremiel is named as an archangel in the apocryphal books of Esdras and Enoch in the Old Testament.

JEROME

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: jə-ROM

From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.

JOASH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹאָשׁ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JO-ash (English)

From the Hebrew name יוֹאָשׁ (Yo'ash) which possibly meant either "fire of YAHWEH" or "YAHWEH has given". In the Old Testament this name was borne by several characters including the father of Gideon, a king of Judah, and a son of King Ahab of Israel.

JOB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Dutch

Other Scripts: אִיּוֹב (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOB (English), YAWP (Dutch)

From the Hebrew name אִיּוֹב ('Iyyov) which means "persecuted, hated". In the Book of Job in the Old Testament he is a patient man who is tested by God.

JOEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOL (English), JO-əl (English)

From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.

JOHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN (English)

English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second is the apostle John, who is also traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

JOLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Various

Pronounced: JO-lee (English), zho-LEE (French)

Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.

JOSEFINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish

Pronounced: ho-se-FEE-nah (Spanish), zhoo-zə-FEE-nə (Portuguese), yoo-se-FEE-nah (Swedish)

Spanish, Portuguese and Swedish feminine form of JOSEPH

JOSEFINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: yo-ze-FEE-nə

German form of JOSÉPHINE

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

JUDE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JOOD (English)

Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

JULIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, German

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YUWL-yahn (Polish), YOO-lee-ahn (German)

From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JULIET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOO-lee-et, JOOL-yət

Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

JUNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOON

From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

JUSTUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: YUWS-tuws (German), JUS-təs (English)

Latin name which meant "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.

KAROL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Polish, Slovak, Slovene

Pronounced: KAH-rawl (Polish)

Polish, Slovak and Slovene form of KARL

KARSTEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German

Pronounced: KAHR-sten

Low German form of CHRISTIAN

KATHERINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German

Pronounced: kath-ə-REE-nə (English), kə-THREE-nə (English), kah-te-REE-nah (German)

Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).

KELLY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: KEL-ee

Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).

KIERAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Anglicized form of CIARÁN

KLAUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish

Pronounced: KLOWS (German)

German short form of NICHOLAS

KRIKOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Armenian

Other Scripts: Գրիգոր (Armenian)

Variant transcription of GRIGOR

KYRIAKOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Κυριακος (Greek)

Greek form of CYRIACUS

LACHLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)

Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: לָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "of God" in Hebrew. This was the name of the father of Eliasaph in the Old Testament.

LAURENCE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ənts

From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

LAURENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: lo-RAWN

French form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).

LEIF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: LAYF

From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendent, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.

LEILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Iranian, English, Georgian

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)

Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LEONID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Леонид (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: lye-ah-NEET (Russian), lee-ah-NEET (Russian)

Russian and Macedonian form of LEONIDAS

LEONIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Late Latin name which was derived from LEO.

LEONTI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Леонтий (Russian)

Variant transcription of LEONTIY

LEONTIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λεοντιος (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of LEONTIOS

LEONZIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of LEONTIOS

LEOPOLD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish

Pronounced: LE-o-pawlt (German), LAY-o-pawlt (Dutch), LEE-ə-pold (English), le-AW-pawlt (Polish)

Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).

LESZEK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: LE-shek

Diminutive of LECH

LEV (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Лев (Russian)

Pronounced: LYEF

Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).

LEV (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לֵב (Hebrew)

Means "heart" in Hebrew.

LIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)

Irish short form of WILLIAM

LIESEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: LEE-zel

German diminutive of ELISABETH

LINCOLN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LING-kən

From a surname which was originally from the name of a city in England, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.

LINDITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Albanian

Means "the day is born" in Albanian.

LINUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Other Scripts: Λινος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LIE-nəs (English), LEE-nuws (German)

From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times it was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.

LIOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר (Hebrew)

Means "light for me" in Hebrew.

LIRON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִירוֹן (Hebrew)

Means "song for me" or "joy for me" in Hebrew.

LOÏC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Breton

Breton form of LOUIS

LORCÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: LOR-kan

Means "little fierce one", derived from Irish Gaelic lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.

LOREN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ən

Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).

LORENS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1)

LORENZO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: lo-REN-tso (Italian), lo-REN-tho (Spanish), lo-REN-so (Latin American Spanish)

Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)). Lorenzo de' Medici, known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.

LUCA (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Romanian, German

Pronounced: LOO-kah (Italian)

Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.

LUCAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), luy-KAH (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese)

Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LUCIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian, English

Pronounced: LOO-shən (English)

Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUCIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHAH-nah (Italian), loo-THYAH-nah (Spanish), loo-SYAH-nah (Latin American Spanish)

Feminine form of LUCIANUS

LUCIEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of LUCIANUS

LUCINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.

LUCINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Armenian

Other Scripts: Լուսինե (Armenian)

Variant transcription of LUSINE

LUKA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Лука (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian), ლუკა (Georgian), Лѹка (Church Slavic)

Form of LUKE

LUX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: LUKS (English)

Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German)

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Astronomy

Pronounced: LIE-rə (English), LEE-rə (English)

The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

MACARIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: mah-KAH-ryo

Spanish form of the Latin name Macarius, derived from the Greek name Μακαριος (Makarios), which was in turn derived from Greek μακαρ (makar) meaning "blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints.

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

French form of MAGDALENE

MADOC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Possibly derived from Welsh mad "fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix.

MAE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAGDALENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish, English

Other Scripts: Магдалена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Pronounced: mahk-dah-LE-nah (German), mahg-dah-LE-nah (Polish), mag-da-LAY-na (English)

Latinate form of MAGDALENE

MAKSIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Belarusian, Macedonian, Ukrainian

Other Scripts: Максим (Russian, Macedonian, Ukrainian), Максім (Belarusian)

Pronounced: mahk-SEEM (Russian)

Russian, Belarusian and Macedonian form of MAXIMUS, as well as a variant transliteration of Ukrainian MAKSYM.

MALACHI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)

From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MANNIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Anglicized form of MAINCHÍN

MARGUERITE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mar-gə-REET, mar-GREET

French form of MARGARET. This is also a French word meaning "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).

MARIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: mah-RYAH-nah (Spanish)

Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.

MARIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-REE (French), mah-REE (German)

French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

MARINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek, Russian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)

Pronounced: mah-REE-nah (Italian, Spanish, German, Russian)

Feminine form of MARINUS

MARION (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: MER-ee-ən (English), MAR-ee-ən (English)

Medieval French diminutive of MARIE

MARTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Georgian

Other Scripts: Марта (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მართა (Georgian)

Pronounced: MAHR-tah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, Czech)

Cognate of MARTHA

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MASSIMILIANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: mahs-see-mee-LYAH-no

Italian form of MAXIMILIAN

MATRONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Late Roman

Other Scripts: Матрона (Russian)

Means "lady" in Late Latin. This was the name of three early saints.

MATVEI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Матвей (Russian)

Pronounced: maht-VYAY

Variant transcription of MATVEY

MAYIM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: ?

Means "water" in Hebrew. This is the name of a Jewish folk dance.

MELCHIOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: MEL-khee-awr (Dutch), MEL-kyawr (English)

Derived from Semitic roots meaning "king city". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus.

MERARI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: מְרָרִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This was the name of the youngest son of Levi in the Old Testament.

MERRILL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-əl

From an English surname which was derived from the given name MURIEL.

MERRITT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-it

From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.

MESHACH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: מֵישַׁך (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: MEE-shak (English)

Possibly means "who is what Aku is?" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament this is the Babylonian name of Mishael, one of the three men cast into a blazing furnace but saved from harm by God.

METHODIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Μεθοδιος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: mə-THO-dee-əs (English)

Latinized form of the Greek name Μεθοδιος (Methodios), derived from Greek μεθοδος (methodos) meaning "pursuit" or "method", ultimately from μετα (meta) "with" and ‘οδος (hodos) "road". Saint Methodius was a Greek missionary to the Slavs who developed the Cyrillic alphabet (with his brother Cyril) in order to translate the Bible into Slavic.

MICAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: מִיכָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIE-kə (English)

Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He predicted the destruction of Jerusalem. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.

MICAIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: מִיכָיְהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: mie-KAY-ə (English)

Means "who is like YAHWEH?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament belonging to both males and females.

MILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz

From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element mil meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MIRON (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish

Other Scripts: Мирон (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: MEE-rawn (Polish)

Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian and Polish form of MYRON

MONTAGUE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: MAHN-tə-gyoo

From a surname meaning "pointed mountain" in French.

MONTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHN-tee

Diminutive of MONTGOMERY

MORCANT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Celtic

Old Welsh form of MORGAN (1)

MORGAN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, French

Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English)

From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

NADAV

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: נָדָב (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of NADAB

NAPHTALI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: נַפְתָלִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: NAF-tə-lie (English)

Means "wrestling" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a son of Jacob by Rachel's servant Bilhah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

NATHANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: nə-THAN-ee-əl (English), nə-THAN-yəl (English)

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NEMO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: NEE-mo (English)

Means "nobody" in Latin. This was the name used by author Jules Verne for the captain of the Nautilus in his novel '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea' (1870).

NEPHELE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Νεφελη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NEF-el-ee (English)

Means "cloudy" in Greek. In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.

NEREUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Νηρευς (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NEER-oos (English), NEER-ee-əs (English)

Derived from Greek νηρος (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.

NESTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Russian

Other Scripts: Νεστωρ (Ancient Greek), Нестор (Russian)

Pronounced: NES-tor (English)

Means "homecoming" in Greek. In Homer's 'Iliad' this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.

NICODEMUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Νικοδημος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: nik-ə-DEE-məs (English)

From the Greek name Νικοδημος (Nikodemos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and δημος (demos) "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.

NICOLAO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Spanish form of NICHOLAS

NIKANDROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Νικανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Means "victory of a man" from the Greek elements νικη (nike) "victory" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". This was the name of a 2nd-century BC Greek poet and grammarian.

NIKEPHOROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Νικηφορος (Ancient Greek)

Means "carrying victory" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and φορεω (phoreo) "to carry, to bear". Besides being a masculine personal name, it was also a title borne by the goddess Athena.

NIKITA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Macedonian, Ukrainian, Belarusian

Other Scripts: Никита (Russian, Macedonian), Нікіта (Ukrainian, Belarusian)

Pronounced: nee-KEE-tah (Russian)

Russian and Macedonian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.

NIKOLAI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Николай (Russian, Bulgarian)

Pronounced: nee-kah-LIE (Russian)

Variant transcription of NIKOLAY

NOACH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: נוֹחַ (Hebrew)

Pronounced: NO-ahkh (Dutch)

Hebrew and Dutch form of NOAH (1)

NOAH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹחַ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: NO-ə (English)

Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

NOAM

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: נוֹעַם (Hebrew)

Means "pleasantness" in Hebrew. A famous bearer is Noam Chomsky (1928-), an American linguist and philosopher.

NOLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: NO-lan

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendent of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.

OCTAVIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-əs (English)

Roman family name meaning "eighth" from Latin octavus. This was the original family name of the emperor Augustus (born Gaius Octavius).

ODETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: o-DET

French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

OLIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak

Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AHL-ə-vər (English), AW-lee-ver (German)

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OLIVIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Dutch

Pronounced: o-lee-VYAY (French), O-lee-veer (Dutch)

French and Dutch form of OLIVER

ORLANDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: or-LAHN-do

Italian form of ROLAND. A city in Florida bears this name, as does a character in Shakespeare's play 'As You like It' (1599).

OSHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֹשֶׁר (Hebrew)

Means "happiness" in Hebrew.

PAIGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PAYJ

From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".

PAMPHILOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Παμφιλος (Ancient Greek)

Means "friend of all" from Greek παν (pan) "all" and φιλος (philos) "friend".

PANDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pan-DAWR-ə (English)

Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PASTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Late Roman

From a Late Latin name meaning "shepherd". This was the name of at least three saints.

PAX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PÉPIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: PEP-in (English)

Frankish name of unknown meaning. It possibly means "awe-inspiring" from Frankish bib- "to tremble". This was the name of three majordomos of Austrasia including Pépin III the Short, who became the first Carolingian king of the Franks. He was the father of Charlemagne.

PEREGRINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PER-ə-grin, PER-ə-green

From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.

PERSEPHONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)

Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical

Pronounced: PEE-tər (English), PE-ter (German, Slovak), PAY-tər (Dutch)

Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century.

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PHILIPPA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British), German

Pronounced: FIL-i-pə (English), fi-LIP-ə (English)

Latinate feminine form of PHILIP

PHILLIP

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FIL-ip

Variant of PHILIP, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.

PHINEAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: FIN-ee-əs (English)

Variant of PHINEHAS used in some versions of the Bible.

PHOEBE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)

Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PIRAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Cornish

Possibly derived from CIARÁN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish monk who founded a monastery in Cornwall. He is the patron saint of Cornwall.

PIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: PIE-əs (English)

Late Latin name meaning "pious, dutiful". This was the name of twelve popes.

RAFAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Рафаел (Macedonian)

Pronounced: rah-fah-EL (Spanish), RAH-fah-el (German)

Form of RAPHAEL

RAFFAELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Italian feminine form of RAPHAEL

RAFFAELLO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of RAPHAEL

RAINIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

French form of RAYNER

RAPHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (French), RAF-ee-el (English), RAY-fee-əl (English)

From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Old Testament in the Book of Tobit, where it is told how he aided Tobias. This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (usually known simply as Raphael).

REMIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Means "mercy of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.

RENATA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman

Pronounced: re-NAH-tah (Italian, Spanish, German, Polish)

Feminine form of RENATUS

RENATUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Late Latin name meaning "born again".

REX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: REKS

From Latin rex "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

RIGEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Derived from Arabic الرجل (al-Rijl) meaning "foot". This is the name of the star that forms the left foot of the constellation Orion.

RIORDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Anglicized form of RÓRDÁN

RISTO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Ристо (Macedonian)

Finnish and Macedonian short form of CHRISTOPHER

RIVKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: רִיבְקָה (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of REBECCA

ROCCO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ROK-ko (Italian)

Germanic name derived from the element hrok meaning "rest". This was the name of a 14th-century French saint who nursed victims of the plague but eventually contracted the disease himself. He is the patron saint of the sick.

RODERICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish, Welsh

Pronounced: RAHD-ə-rik (English), RAHD-rik (English)

Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).

ROMEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of the Late Latin name Romaeus meaning "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

RÓNÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: RON-awn

Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

RORY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Pronounced: RAWR-ee

Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ

ROSALIND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-lind

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and linde "soft, tender". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).

ROSALINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAWZ-ə-lien, ROZ-ə-leen

Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

ROSCOE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAHS-ko

From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.

ROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: ROZ

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROSEMARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree

Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

RUPERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German, Dutch, English, Polish

Pronounced: RUY-pərt (Dutch), ROO-pərt (English), RUW-pert (Polish)

Low German form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.

RUTH (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)

From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament, a Moabite woman who was the ancestor of King David. As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SABINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Сабина (Russian)

Pronounced: sah-BEE-nah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.

SAMSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAM-sən (English)

From the Hebrew name שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Shimshon) which probably meant "sun". Samson was an Old Testament hero granted exceptional strength by God. His mistress Delilah betrayed him and cut his hair, stripping him of his power. Thus he was captured by the Philistines, blinded, and brought to their temple. However, in a final act of strength, he pulled down the pillars of the temple upon himself and his captors.

This name was known among the Normans due to the Welsh bishop Saint Samson, who founded monasteries in Brittany and Normandy in the 6th century. In his case, the name may have been a translation of his true Celtic name. As an English name, Samson was common during the Middle Ages, having been introduced by the Normans.

SASHA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Саша (Russian)

Russian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA

SCHOLASTICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

From a Late Latin name which was derived from scholasticus meaning "rhetorician, orator". This was the name of a 6th-century saint, the sister of Saint Benedict.

SCOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: SKAHT

From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimately origin uncertain.

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish)

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SEBASTIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Italian feminine form of Sebastianus (see SEBASTIAN).

SERAFINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish

Pronounced: se-rah-FEE-nah (Polish)

Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA

SERAFINO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of Seraphinus (see SERAPHINA).

SÉRAPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: say-ra-FEEN

French form of SERAPHINA

SERGIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Roman family name, possibly meaning "servant" in Latin but most likely of unknown Etruscan origin. Saint Sergius was a 4th-century Roman officer who was martyred in Syria. He is the patron saint of Christian desert nomads. Another saint by this name (in the Russian form Sergey) was a 14th-century Russian spiritual leader. The name was also borne by four popes.

SHADRACH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שַׁדְרַך (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SHAD-rak (English), SHAY-drak (English)

Means "command of Aku" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament, Shadrach is the Babylonian name of Hananiah, one of the three men cast into a fiery furnace but saved by God.

SHIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of SIMON

SHIMSHON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Hebrew)

Hebrew form of SAMSON

SIMEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian

Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Симеон (Bulgarian, Serbian)

Pronounced: SIM-ee-ən (English)

From the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament this is the name of a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. It was also borne by a powerful 10th-century ruler of Bulgaria.

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SIRIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Pronounced: SIR-ee-əs (English), SEER-ee-əs (English)

The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σειριος (seirios) "burning".

SOLON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σολων (Ancient Greek)

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an Athenian statesman who reformed the laws and government of the city.

SONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian

Pronounced: SON-yə (English), SAWN-yə (English), SO-nyah (Italian)

Variant of SONYA

SØREN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian

Pronounced: SUU-ren

Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.

STAVROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Σταυρος (Greek)

Means "cross" in Greek, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.

STELIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Romanian

Romanian form of STYLIANOS

TABITHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ταβιθα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: TAB-i-thə (English)

Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.

TALIESIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: tal-ee-ES-in

Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". In Welsh mythology Taliesin was a wizard and bard who acquired the gift of prophecy.

TATIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Romanian, Polish, Greek, Georgian, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Татьяна (Russian), Татяна (Bulgarian), Τατιανα (Greek), ტატიანა (Georgian)

Pronounced: tah-TYAH-nah (Russian, Polish, Spanish, Italian), ta-tee-AN-ə (English), ta-TYAN-ə (English)

Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.

TEAGAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendent of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.

TERENZIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of Terentius (see TERENCE).

TERESA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: te-RE-sah (Spanish, Polish), te-RE-zah (Italian, German), tə-REE-sə (English), tə-REE-zə (English)

Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THERON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θηρων (Ancient Greek)

Means "hunter" in Greek.

THIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)

Variant of TIAGO

THIBAULT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: tee-BO

French form of THEOBALD

TIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of JAMES, derived from SANTIAGO.

TIZIANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: tee-TSYAH-no

Italian form of the Roman cognomen Titianus, which was derived from the Roman praenomen TITUS. A famous bearer was the Venetian Renaissance painter Tiziano Vecellio, known in English as Titian.

TOBIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: טוֹבִיָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: to-BIE-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name טוֹבִיָּה (Toviyyah) which meant "YAHWEH is good". This was the name of an Ammonite in the Book of Nehemiah in the Old Testament.

TOBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TO-bin

From an English surname which was itself derived from the given name TOBIAS.

TOMER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: תּוֹמֶר (Hebrew)

Means "palm tree" in Hebrew.

TORE (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Short form of SALVATORE

TORSTEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Danish, German

Pronounced: TAWR-sten (German)

From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".

TOVIA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Hebrew form of TOBIAH, also used as a feminine form.

TRAJAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Трајан (Macedonian)

Pronounced: TRAY-jən (English)

From the Roman cognomen Traianus, which is of unknown meaning. The Roman emperor Trajan (full name Marcus Ulpius Traianus) is considered among the most capable men to have led the empire. His military accomplishments include victories over Dacia and Parthia.

TRISTAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, French, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), trees-TAWN (French)

Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". In Celtic legend Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. Instead, Tristan and Isolde end up falling in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

TULLIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Italian form of the Roman family name Tullius, which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer was Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman orator and author.

TUOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Means "strength vigour" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tuor was the mortal man who came to the hidden city of Gondolin to warn of its imminent doom. When Gondolin was attacked and destroyed he escaped with his wife Idril and son Eärendil, and sailed into the west.

TURIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Means "victory mood" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Turin was a cursed hero, the slayer of the dragon Glaurung. He was also called Turambar, Mormegil, and other names. This is also the Anglicized name of the city of Torino in Italy.

TYCHO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Τυχων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: TIE-ko (English)

From the Greek name Τυχων (Tychon) meaning "hitting the mark". This was the name of a Greek saint. It was also borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).

URSULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman

Pronounced: UR-sə-lə (English), UR-syə-lə (English)

Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.

VALENCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: bah-LEN-thyah (Spanish), bah-LEN-syah (Latin American Spanish)

From a Late Latin name which was derived from valentia "power". Cities in Spain and Venezuela bear this name.

VALENTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VAL-ən-tien

From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.

VALERIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History, Russian, Ukrainian, Georgian, Romanian

Other Scripts: Валериан (Russian), Валеріан (Ukrainian), ვალერიან (Georgian)

Pronounced: və-LIR-ee-ən (English)

From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name VALERIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.

VERONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (English)

Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VESPASIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: ve-SPAY-zhən (English)

From the Roman cognomen Vespasianus, derived either from Latin vesper meaning "west" or "evening" or vespa meaning "wasp". This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.

VICTOIRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: veek-TWAWR

French form of VICTORIA (1)

VICTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), veek-TOR (French)

Roman name meaning "victor" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who wrote 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VIGGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".

VILMOS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: VEEL-mosh

Hungarian form of WILLIAM

VIOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vee-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYO-lah (Italian)

Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIVIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman

Pronounced: vee-vee-AH-nah (Italian)

Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.

WARWICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: WAWR-ik, WAHR-ik

From an English surname which was derived from the name of a town meaning "dam farm" (from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wic "dairy farm").

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: REN

From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

YALE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

From a Welsh surname which was itself derived from a place name meaning "fertile upland" (from Welsh ial).

ZEBULUN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: זְבוּלֻן (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ZEB-yoo-lən (English)

Possibly derived from Ugartic zbl meaning "prince". Zebulun is the tenth son of Jacob in the Old Testament and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Genesis 30:20 implies two different roots for the name: זָבַל (zaval) "to honour" or "to dwell", and זֵבֵד (zeved) "gift, dowry". These are probably only folk etymologies.

ZEKİ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Turkish

Means "intelligent" in Turkish (ultimately of Arabic origin).

ZEPHANIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: צְפַנְיָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ze-fə-NIE-ə (English)

From the Hebrew name צְפַנְיָה (Tzefanyah) meaning "YAHWEH has hidden". This is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Zephaniah.

ZERACHIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Possibly means "command of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.

ZIMRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: זִמְרִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ZIM-rie (English)

Means either "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament who rules for only seven days.

ZOTICUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ζωτικος (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of the Greek name Ζωτικος (Zotikos), derived from ζωτικος (zotikos) meaning "full of life". This was the name of several early saints.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.