Names Starting with M

gender
usage
Malati f Indian, Hindi
Means "jasmine" in Sanskrit.
Malaysia f English (Modern)
From the name of the country in Southeast Asia, the home of the Malay people. Their ethnic name is of uncertain origin, though it is possibly from the name of a river, itself derived from Malay melaju or Javanese mlayu meaning "to run, to go fast".
Malcolm m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint Columba". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had defeated his father Duncan. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (1606) is loosely based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
Malcom m English
Variant of Malcolm.
Maldwyn m Welsh
From Maldwyn, another name for the old Welsh county of Montgomeryshire. It is so called from Trefaldwyn, the Welsh name for the county town of Montgomery, misinterpreting it as if meaning "town of Maldwyn". In fact it means "town of Baldwin" (in Welsh both m and b mutate to f).
Maleficent f Popular Culture
From an English word meaning "harmful, evil", derived from Latin maleficens. This is the name of the villain in the animated Disney film Sleeping Beauty (1959).
Maleko m Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of Mark.
Malena f Swedish, Spanish
Swedish and Spanish short form of Magdalena.
Malene f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of Magdalena.
Målfrid f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Málmfríðr, derived from an uncertain first element (possibly malmr meaning "ore") combined with fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved". This was the name of a 12th-century princess of Kyiv who married King Sigurd I of Norway.
Malger m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements mahal meaning "meeting, assembly, court" and ger meaning "spear".
Małgorzata f Polish
Polish form of Margaret.
Małgosia f Polish
Diminutive of Małgorzata.
Mali f Thai
Means "jasmine" in Thai.
Malia f Hawaiian, English (Modern)
Hawaiian form of Maria. This name experienced a spike in popularity in 2009, due to the eldest daughter (born 1998) of the new American president Barack Obama.
Mālie f Hawaiian
Means "calm" in Hawaiian.
Malik 1 m Arabic
Means "king" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الملك (al-Malik) is one of the 99 names of Allah. This can also be another way of transcribing the name مالك (see Maalik).
Malik 2 m Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "wave, sea" in Greenlandic.
Malika f Arabic
Means "queen" in Arabic, the feminine form of Malik 1.
Malin f Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian short form of Magdalene.
Malina 1 f Scottish
Feminine form of Malcolm.
Malina 2 f Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish
Means "raspberry" in several Slavic languages.
Malinalli f Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "tall grass" in Nahuatl.
Malinda f English
Variant of Melinda.
Malini f Indian, Hindi
Means "fragrant" in Sanskrit.
Malka f Hebrew
Means "queen" in Hebrew.
Malkhaz m Georgian
Possibly means "beautiful, elegant, youthful" in Georgian.
Malkhazi m Georgian
Form of Malkhaz with the nominative suffix, used when the name is written stand-alone.
Mallaidh f Irish (Rare)
Irish form of Molly.
Malle f Estonian, Medieval English
Estonian diminutive of Maria or Maarja, now used independently. This was also a medieval English diminutive of Mary.
Mallory f English (Modern)
From an English surname that meant "unfortunate" in Norman French. It first became common in the 1980s due to the American sitcom Family Ties (1982-1989), which featured a character by this name.
Mallt f Welsh
Welsh form of Matilda.
Málmfríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Målfrid.
Malo m Breton
Means "bright pledge", derived from Old Breton mach "pledge, hostage" and lou "bright, brilliant". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint, supposedly a companion of Saint Brendan on his trans-Atlantic journey. He later went to Brittany, where he founded the monastic settlement of Saint-Malo.
Malone m & f English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Malou f Danish
Short form of Marie-Louise.
Malte m Danish, Swedish, German
Danish short form of the Old German name Helmold. This name was used by the Austrian author Rainer Maria Rilke for the title character in his novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (1910).
Malthe m Danish
Variant of Malte.
Malvina f Literature, English, Italian, French
Created by the Scottish poet James MacPherson in the 18th century for a character in his Ossian poems. He probably intended it to mean "smooth brow", from Scottish Gaelic mala "brow" and mìn "smooth, fine" (lenited to mhìn and pronounced with a v sound).
Malvolio m Literature
Means "ill will" in Italian. This name was invented by Shakespeare for pompous character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602).
Malwina f Polish
Polish form of Malvina.
Mamadou m Western African
Form of Muhammad used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
Mamadu m Western African
Form of Muhammad used in western Africa (Guinea-Bissau).
Mami f Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" or (ma) meaning "flax" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
Mamie f English
Diminutive of Mary or Margaret.
Məmməd m Azerbaijani
Contracted form of Məhəmməd.
Mammad m Azerbaijani
Alternate transcription of Azerbaijani Məmməd.
Mamman m Western African, Hausa
Contracted form of Muhammadu.
Mamoun m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic مأمون (see Mamun).
Mamuka m Georgian
Means "little father" in Georgian.
Mamun m Arabic, Bengali
Means "trustworthy" in Arabic.
Manaem m Biblical Greek
Form of Menahem used in the Greek Old Testament.
Managold m Germanic
Old German name derived from the elements manag "many" and walt "power, authority".
Manahem m Biblical Latin
Form of Menahem used in the Latin Old Testament.
Manaia f & m Maori
From the name of a stylized design common in Maori carvings. It represents a mythological creature with the head of a bird and the body of a human.
Manami f Japanese
From Japanese (mana) meaning "love, affection" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "sea, ocean". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Manana f Georgian
Means both "heather" and "manna, divine food" in Georgian.
Manannán m Irish Mythology
Probably from the name of the Isle of Man, itself possibly from the Celtic root *moniyo- meaning "mountain". In Irish mythology Manannán mac Lir was a god of the sea and one of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
Manas m Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi
Means "mind, intellect, spirit" in Sanskrit.
Manasseh m Biblical
Means "causing to forget" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the oldest son of Joseph and Asenath and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. It was also borne by a 7th-century BC king of Judah, condemned in the Bible for allowing the worship of other gods.
Manasses m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Manasseh used in the Greek and Latin Bible. It is also the form used in some English versions of the New Testament.
Manawydan m Welsh Mythology
Welsh cognate of Manannán. According to the Mabinogi he was a son of Llŷr, and the brother of Brân and Branwen. He participated in his brother's invasion of Ireland, and was one of only seven warriors to return. Afterwards he became a companion of Pryderi and married his widowed mother Rhiannon.
Manca f Slovene
Slovene diminutive of Marija.
Manda f Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of Magdalena.
Mandawuy m Indigenous Australian, Yolngu
Means "from clay" in Yolngu.
Mandeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Mandi f English
Diminutive of Amanda.
Mandica f Croatian
Diminutive of Manda.
Mandla m Southern African, Zulu, Ndebele
Means "strength, power" in Zulu and Ndebele.
Mandlenkosi m Southern African, Zulu, Ndebele
From Zulu and Ndebele amandla "strength, power" and inkosi "king, chief".
Mandy f English
Diminutive of Amanda.
Mane f Armenian
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Armenian մանանա (manana) meaning "manna".
Manel 1 m Catalan
Catalan form of Manuel.
Manel 2 m Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Manuel.
Manfred m German, Dutch, Polish, Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements man "man" and fridu "peace". It was borne by a 13th-century king of Sicily. Another notable bearer was Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the World War I pilot known as the Red Baron. This is also the name of the main character in Lord Byron's drama Manfred (1817).
Manfredi m Italian
Southern Italian form of Manfred.
Manfredo m Italian
Italian form of Manfred.
Manfried m German (Rare)
German variant of Manfred.
Mangatjay m Indigenous Australian, Yolngu
Meaning unknown, of Yolngu origin.
Mani 1 m Hinduism, Tamil, Indian, Malayalam, Telugu, Kannada
Means "jewel" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata this name is borne by a serpent and an attendant of Skanda.
Mani 2 m Persian
Meaning unknown, presumably of Persian origin. Mani was a 3rd-century prophet who founded the religion of Manichaeism (which is now extinct).
Manijeh f Persian
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Parthian origin. This is the name of a princess in Bijan and Manijeh, a story that forms part of the 10th-century Persian epic the Shahnameh.
Maninder m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" combined with the name of the Hindu god Indra.
Manish m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Malayalam, Punjabi, Tamil, Nepali
From Sanskrit मनीषा (manisha) meaning "thought, wisdom".
Manisha f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Feminine form of Manish.
Manius m Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was possibly derived from Latin manus "good".
Manizha f Tajik
Tajik form of Manijeh.
Manjeet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and जिति (jiti) meaning "victory, conquering".
Manju f Indian, Hindi, Malayalam, Telugu
Means "lovely, beautiful" in Sanskrit.
Manjula f Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Malayalam
Means "pleasing, beautiful" in Sanskrit.
Manjusha f Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "small box, small chest" in Sanskrit.
Manley m English
From an English surname, originally a place name, meaning "common clearing" in Old English.
Manlio m Italian
Italian form of Manlius.
Manlius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin mane "morning". Marcus Manlius Capitolinus was a Roman consul who saved Rome from the Gauls in the 4th century BC.
Mannes m Dutch
Dutch diminutive of Herman.
Mannix m Irish
Anglicized form of Mainchín.
Manno m Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element man meaning "person, man" (Proto-Germanic *mannô).
Manny m English
Short form of Emmanuel.
Manoel m Galician, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Galician form and Portuguese variant of Manuel.
Manoja m Hinduism
Means "born of the mind", from Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and (ja) meaning "born". This is another name of the Hindu god Kama.
Manola f Spanish
Spanish feminine diminutive of Manuel.
Manolo m Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Manuel.
Manon f French, Dutch
French diminutive of Marie.
Manouel m Late Greek
Medieval Greek form of Manuel.
Manpreet f & m Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and प्रीति (priti) meaning "pleasure, joy, love".
Måns m Swedish
Swedish variant of Magnus.
Mansel m English (Rare)
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who came from the French city of Le Mans.
Mansoor m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic منصور (see Mansur).
Mansour m Persian
Persian form of Mansur.
Mansur m Arabic, Turkish, Indonesian, Uzbek
Means "victorious" in Arabic. Abu Jafar al-Mansur was an 8th-century Abbasid caliph and the founder of the city of Baghdad.
Mantas m Lithuanian
From Lithuanian mantus meaning "intelligent, clever" or manta meaning "property, wealth". Herkus Mantas was a 13th-century Prussian hero who fought against the Teutonic Knights.
Mantvydas m Lithuanian
From Lithuanian mantus "intelligent" or manta "property, wealth" combined with the root vyd- "to see".
Manu 1 m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Kannada
Means "thinking, wise" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is a title of Svayambhuva, the progenitor of the human race, as well as several of his descendants.
Manu 2 m & f French, Spanish, German, Finnish
Short form of Manuel or Emmanuel (and also of Manuela in Germany).
Manu 3 m Finnish
Variant of Mauno.
Manuel m Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Emmanuel. In the spelling Μανουήλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
Manuele m Italian
Italian variant of Manuel.
Manuelita f Spanish
Diminutive of Manuela.
Manus m Irish
Irish form of Magnus.
Manvel m Armenian
Armenian form of Emmanuel.
Manya f Russian
Russian diminutive of Maria.
Manyara f Southern African, Shona
Means "you have been humbled" in Shona.
Mao f Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" or (mai) meaning "dance" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Maoilios m Scottish Gaelic
Means "servant of Jesus" in Scottish Gaelic.
Maol Chaluim m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Malcolm.
Ma'ome m Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "ice" in Cheyenne.
Maor m Hebrew
Means "a light" in Hebrew.
Maple f English
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English mapul. This is the name of a girl in Robert Frost's poem Maple (1923) who wonders about the origin of her unusual name.
Maponos m Celtic Mythology
Means "great son", from the Celtic root *makwos meaning "son" (Gaulish and Brythonic mapos) combined with the divine or augmentative suffix -on. This was the name of a god of youth worshipped in Gaul and Britain. He was commonly equated with the Greco-Roman god Apollo.
Maqsood m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu مقصود (see Maqsud).
Maqsud m Arabic, Urdu
Means "intention, aim" in Arabic.
Maquinna m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
From Nuu-chah-nulth Mukwina, possibly meaning "possessor of pebbles". This was the name of a late 18th-century chief of the Mowachaht people.
Mar f Spanish, Catalan
Means "sea" in Spanish and Catalan. It is from a devotional title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Mar "Our Lady of the Sea", the patron saint of the Spanish province of Almería.
Māra f Latvian, Baltic Mythology
This was the name of a Latvian mother goddess. Her name is possibly derived from Maria, identifying her with the Virgin Mary. In modern times this name is used as a variant of Marija.
Mara 1 f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is a name that Naomi calls herself after the death of her husband and sons (see Ruth 1:20).
Mara 2 f Hungarian, Croatian, Serbian
Hungarian variant of Mária, and a Croatian and Serbian variant of Marija.
Maraĵa f Esperanto
Means "made of the sea" in Esperanto, a derivative of maro "sea", ultimately from Latin mare.
Maral f Mongolian, Azerbaijani, Armenian
Means "deer" in Mongolian, Azerbaijani and Armenian, referring to the Caspian Red Deer.
Maralyn f English
Variant of Marilyn.
Maram f & m Arabic
Means "wish, desire" in Arabic.
Marama f & m Maori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "moon" in Maori. This is the name of a moon god (or goddess) in Maori mythology.
Marat m Tatar
Tatar form of Murad.
Marc m French, Catalan, Welsh
French, Catalan and Welsh form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marcas m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marceau m French
Old French variant of Marcel. A famous bearer of the surname was the French general François Séverin Marceau (1769-1796).
Marcel m French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of Marcellus used in several languages. Notable bearers include the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922) and the French artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968).
Marceli m Polish
Polish form of Marcellus.
Marcelin m French
French form of Marcellinus.
Marcelina f Polish, Spanish, Portuguese
Polish, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Marcellinus.
Marceline f French
French feminine form of Marcellinus.
Marcelinho m Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Marcelo.
Marcelino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcellinus.
Marcell m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Marcellus.
Marcelle f French
French feminine form of Marcellus.
Marcellette f French (Rare)
French feminine diminutive of Marcellus.
Marcellin m French
French form of Marcellinus.
Marcelline f French
French feminine form of Marcellinus.
Marcellino m Italian
Italian form of Marcellinus.
Marcellinus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from Marcellus. Saint Marcellinus was a pope of the early 4th century who was supposedly martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
Marcello m Italian
Italian form of Marcellus.
Marcellus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of Marcus. This was the name of two popes.
Marcelo m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcellus.
Marci f English
Diminutive of Marcia.
Márcia f Portuguese
Portuguese form of Marcia.
Marcia f English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Marcius. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
Marcial m Spanish
Spanish form of Martialis (see Martial).
Marciana f Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Feminine form of Marcianus. This was the name of a young woman martyred in North Africa during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
Marciano m Portuguese, Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Portuguese, Spanish and Italian form of Marcianus.
Marcianus m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was a derivative of the praenomen Marcus. This was the name of a 5th-century Eastern Roman emperor. It was also borne by a 2nd-century saint: a bishop of Tortona, Italy.
Marcie f English
Diminutive of Marcia.
Marcin m Polish
Polish form of Martin.
Márcio m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Marcius.
Marcio m Spanish
Spanish form of Marcius.
Mārcis m Latvian
Originally a short form of Mārtiņš, now used independently.
Marcius m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was a derivative of the praenomen Marcus. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, king of Rome.
Marcjanna f Polish
Polish form of Marciana.
Marco m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of Marcus (see Mark). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
Marcos m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marcus m Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from the name of the Roman god Mars. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
Marcy f English
Diminutive of Marcia.
Mardochaios m Biblical Greek
Biblical Greek form of Mordecai.
Mardocheus m Biblical Latin
Biblical Latin form of Mordecai.
Marduk m Semitic Mythology
Probably from Sumerian amar-Utuk meaning "calf of Utu", derived from amar "calf" combined with the name of the sun god Utu. This was the name of the chief Babylonian god, presiding over heaven, light, sky, battle, and fertility. After killing the dragon Tiamat, who was an old enemy of the gods, he created the world and sky from the pieces of her body.
Mare f Estonian, Slovene, Macedonian, Croatian
Diminutive of Maria and other names beginning with Mar.
Mared f Welsh
Welsh form of Margaret.
Mareike f Frisian, German
Frisian and German diminutive of Maria.
Marek m Polish, Czech, Slovak, Estonian
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Mark.
Mareks m Latvian
Latvian form of Marek.
Maren f Danish, Norwegian
Danish diminutive of Marina or Maria.
Maret f Estonian
Estonian form of Margaret.
Marfa f Russian
Traditional Russian form of Martha.
Marga f German, Dutch
Diminutive of Margarete or Margaretha.
Margaid f Manx
Manx form of Margaret.
Margalit f Hebrew
Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites).
Marganita f Hebrew
From the name of a type of flowering plant common in Israel, called the scarlet pimpernel in English.
Margareeta f Finnish (Rare), Estonian (Rare)
Finnish and Estonian variant form of Margaret.
Margaret f English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
Margaréta f Slovak, Hungarian
Slovak and Hungarian form of Margaret.
Margareta f German, Swedish, Romanian, Slovene, Finnish, Croatian
Form of Margaret in several languages.
Margarete f German
German form of Margaret.
Margaretha f Dutch, Swedish, German
Dutch form of Margaret, as well as a Swedish and German variant form.
Margarethe f German
German form of Margaret.
Margaretta f English
Latinate form of Margaret.
Margarid f Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Մարգարիտ (see Margarit).
Margarida f Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan
Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of Margaret. Also in these languages, this is the common word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margarit f Armenian
Armenian form of Margaret, also meaning "pearl" in Armenian.
Margarita f Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Greek, Albanian, Late Roman
Latinate form of Margaret. This is also the Spanish word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margaux f French
Variant of Margot influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
Marge f English, Estonian
Diminutive of Margaret (English) or Margareeta (Estonian).
Marged f Welsh
Welsh form of Margaret.
Margery f English
Medieval English form of Margaret.
Margetud m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Meredith.
Margh m Cornish
Cornish form of Mark.
Margherita f Italian
Italian form of Margaret. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margie f English
Diminutive of Margaret.
Margit f Hungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of Margaret.
Margita f Slovak, Czech
Slovak form and Czech variant of Margaret.
Margitta f German
German variant form of Margaret.
Margo f English
Variant of Margot.
Margot f French
French short form of Margaret.
Margreet f Limburgish, Dutch
Limburgish form of Margaret and a Dutch variant of Margriet.
Margrét f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Margaret.
Margret f German, English
Contracted form of Margarete or Margaret.
Margrete f Norwegian
Norwegian form of Margaret.
Margrethe f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Margaret. This is the name of the current queen of Denmark (1940-).
Margriet f Dutch
Dutch form of Margaret. This is also the Dutch word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
Margrit f German
German variant form of Margaret.
Marguerite f French
French form of Margaret. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
Margus m Estonian
Estonian form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marharyta f Ukrainian, Belarusian
Ukrainian and Belarusian form of Margaret.
Mari 1 f Estonian, Finnish, Welsh, Breton, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Georgian, Armenian
Estonian, Finnish, Welsh and Breton form of Maria, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of Mária. It is also a Scandinavian, Georgian and Armenian form of the French name Marie.
Mari 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ri) meaning "reason, logic" or (ri) meaning "village". Many other combinations of kanji characters can form this name.
Mari 3 f Basque Mythology
Possibly from Basque emari meaning "donation" or amari meaning "mother". This was the name of a goddess of nature and fertility in Basque mythology.
Mária f Hungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of Maria.
María f & m Spanish, Galician, Icelandic
Spanish, Galician and Icelandic form of Maria.... [more]
Maria f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Armenian, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see Mary). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
María Ángeles f Spanish
Combination of María and Ángeles.
María Auxiliadora f Spanish
Means "Mary the helper" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María Belén f Spanish
Combination of María and Belén.
Mariabella f English (Rare)
Combination of Maria and Bella.
María Carmen f Spanish
Combination of María and Carmen. This was the most popular name for girls in Spain from the 1940s to the 1970s.
Maria Chiara f Italian
Combination of Maria and Chiara.
María Cristina f Spanish
Combination of María and Cristina.
María Cruz f Spanish
Combination of María and Cruz.
María de Jesús f Spanish
Means "Mary (the mother) of Jesus" in Spanish, a compound of María and Jesús.
María De La Cruz f Spanish
Means "Mary of the cross" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María de las Mercedes f Spanish
Means "Mary of mercies" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María del Carmen f Spanish
Means "Mary of Mount Carmel" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary (see Carmen).
María del Mar f Spanish
Means "Mary of the sea" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
Maria del Mar f Catalan
Means "Mary of the sea" in Catalan, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María de los Ángeles f Spanish
Means "Mary of the angels" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María de los Dolores f Spanish
Means "Mary of sorrows" in Spanish, a devotional title of the Virgin Mary.
María Dolores f Spanish
Combination of María and Dolores.
María Fernanda f Spanish
Combination of María and Fernanda.
Maria Francesca f Italian
Combination of Maria and Francesca.
Maria Grazia f Italian
Combination of Maria and Grazia.
Mariah f English
Variant of Maria. It is usually pronounced in a way that reflects an older English pronunciation of Maria. The name was popularized in the early 1990s by the American singer Mariah Carey (1970-).
María Isabel f Spanish
Combination of María and Isabel.
María Jesús f Spanish
Combination of María and Jesús.
Maria João f Portuguese
Combination of Maria and João.
María José f Spanish
Combination of María and José, the names of the parents of Jesus.
Maria José f Portuguese
Combination of Maria and José, the names of the parents of Jesus.
María Josefa f Spanish
Combination of María and Josefa.
Maria Josep f Catalan
Combination of Maria and Josep, the names of the parents of Jesus.
María Lourdes f Spanish
Combination of María and Lourdes.
María Luisa f Spanish
Combination of María and Luisa.
Mariam f Biblical Greek, Georgian, Armenian, Malay, Arabic
Form of Maria used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as the Georgian, Armenian and Malay form. It is also an alternate transcription of Arabic مريم (see Maryam).
Mariama f Western African
Form of Maryam common in western Africa.
María Manuela f Spanish
Combination of María and Manuela.
María Mercedes f Spanish
Combination of María and Mercedes.
Mariami f Georgian
Form of Mariam with the Georgian nominative suffix, used when the name is written stand-alone.
Mariamne f History
From Μαριάμη (Mariame), the form of Maria used by the historian Josephus when referring to the wife of King Herod.
Marián m Slovak, Czech, Hungarian (Rare)
Slovak, Czech and Hungarian form of Marianus.
Marian 1 f English
Variant of Marion 1. This name was borne in English legend by Maid Marian, Robin Hood's love. It is sometimes considered a combination of Mary and Ann.
Marian 2 m Polish, Czech, Romanian
Polish, Czech and Romanian form of Marianus. It is sometimes used as a masculine form of Maria.
Mariana f Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Roman feminine form of Marianus. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of Maria and Ana. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of Mariamne.
Marianela f Spanish
Combination of María and Estela.
Mariangela f Italian
Combination of Maria and Angela.
María Nieves f Spanish
Combination of María and Nieves.
Marianita f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Mariana.