Names Categorized "top 10 in Poland"

This is a list of names in which the categories include top 10 in Poland.
gender
usage
Adam m English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
Agnieszka f Polish
Polish form of Agnes.
Aleksander m Polish, Slovene, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish
Form of Alexander in several languages.
Alicja f Polish
Polish form of Alice.
Amelia f English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Variant of Amalia, though it is sometimes confused with Emilia, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.... [more]
Andrzej m Polish
Polish form of Andrew.
Anna f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see Hannah) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
Antoni m Polish, Catalan
Polish and Catalan form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Beata f Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
Dorota f Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Dorothea.
Ewa f Polish
Polish form of Eve.
Franciszek m Polish
Polish form of Franciscus (see Francis).
Grzegorz m Polish
Polish form of Gregory.
Hanna 1 f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Form of Channah (see Hannah) in several languages.
Henryk m Polish
Polish form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Iwona f Polish
Polish feminine form of Yvon.
Jacek m Polish
Modern form of Jacenty.
Jakub m Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Jacob (or James). In Polish and Slovak this refers to both the Old Testament patriarch and the New Testament apostles, while in Czech this is used only for the apostles (with Jákob for the patriarch).
Jan 1 m Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan, Sorbian
Form of Johannes used in various languages. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painters Jan Vermeer and Jan Steen.
Joanna f English, Polish, Biblical
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ἰωάννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see John). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
Julia f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name Julius. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).... [more]
Kacper m Polish
Polish form of Jasper.
Katarzyna f Polish
Polish form of Katherine.
Klaudia f Polish, Slovak, Hungarian, Albanian, German
Polish, Slovak, Hungarian and Albanian feminine form of Claudius, as well as a German variant form.
Krzysztof m Polish
Polish form of Christopher.
Lena f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as Helena, Magdalena or Yelena.
Maciej m Polish
Polish form of Matthias.
Maja 1 f Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish
Form of Maia 1 in various languages.
Małgorzata f Polish
Polish form of Margaret.
Marcin m Polish
Polish form of Martin.
Marek m Polish, Czech, Slovak, Estonian
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Mark.
Maria f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see Mary). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
Martyna f Polish
Polish feminine form of Martinus (see Martin).
Mikołaj m Polish
Polish form of Nicholas.
Oliwia f Polish
Polish form of Olivia.
Patrycja f Polish
Polish feminine form of Patricius (see Patrick).
Piotr m Polish, Belarusian
Polish and Belarusian form of Peter.
Robert m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).... [more]
Stanisław m Polish
Polish form of Stanislav. Two kings of Poland have borne this name.
Szymon m Polish
Polish form of Simon 1.
Tomasz m Polish
Polish form of Thomas.
Weronika f Polish, Sorbian
Polish and Sorbian form of Veronica.
Wiktoria f Polish
Polish form of Victoria.
Wojciech m Polish
Derived from the Slavic elements voji "warrior, soldier" and tekha "solace, comfort, joy". Saint Wojciech (also known by the Czech form of his name Vojtěch or his adopted name Adalbert) was a Bohemian missionary to Hungary, Poland and Prussia, where he was martyred in the 10th century.
Zofia f Polish
Polish form of Sophia.
Zuzanna f Polish, Latvian (Rare)
Polish and Latvian form of Susanna.