Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is English.
There are 2,458 names matching your criteria. This is page 3.

DELLA   f   English
Diminutive of ADELA or ADELAIDE. A famous bearer is American actress and singer Della Reese (1931-).
DELMA   f   Irish, English
Short form of FIDELMA.
DELORA   f   English
Altered form of DOLORES.
DELORES   f   English
Variant of DOLORES.
DELORIS   f   English
Variant of DOLORES.
DELPHIA   f   English
Possibly from the name of the Greek city of Delphi, the site of an oracle of Apollo, which is possibly related to Greek δελφυς (delphys) "womb"... [more]
DELTA   f   English
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.
DEMELZA   f   English (British)
From a Cornish place name meaning "fort of Maeldaf". It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the British television series 'Poldark', which was set in Cornwall.
DEMETRIA   f   Ancient Greek, English
Feminine form of DEMETRIUS.
DENA   f   English
Possibly a short form of names ending with dena. It has also been used as a variant of DEANNA.
DENICE   f   English
Variant of DENISE.
DENIECE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of DENISE.
DENISE   f   French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of DENIS.
DEONNE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of DIONNE.
DESIRAE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of DESIREE.
DESIREE   f   English
English form of DÉSIRÉE. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the movie 'Désirée' (1954).
DESTINEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of DESTINY.
DESTINY   f   English
Means simply "destiny, fate" from the English word, ultimately from Latin destinare "to determine", a derivative of stare "to stand". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the last half of the 20th century.
DETTA   f   English (Rare)
Short form of names that end in detta.
DEVAN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of DEVIN.
DEVIN   m & f   English, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DEVON   m & f   English
Variant of DEVIN. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.
DEVYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of DEVIN.
DEZIREE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of DÉSIRÉE.
DI   f   English
Short form of DIANA.
DIAMOND   f   English (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis... [more]
DIANE   f   French, English
French form of DIANA, also regularly used in the English-speaking world.
DIANN   f   English
Variant of DIANE.
DIANNA   f   English
Variant of DIANA.
DIANNE   f   French, English
Variant of DIANE.
DIANTHA   f   Dutch, English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
DINA (1)   f   English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of DINAH, and also the form used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DINAH   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament... [more]
DIONE (2)   f   English
Feminine form of DION.
DIONNE   f   English
Feminine form of DION.
DIVINA   f   English (Rare)
From an elaboration of the English word divine meaning "divine, godlike".
DIXIE   f   English
From the term that refers to the southern United States, used by Daniel D. Emmett in his song Dixie in 1859. The term may be derived from French dix "ten", which was printed on ten-dollar bills issued from a New Orleans bank.
DOCIA   f   English
Possibly a diminutive of THEODOSIA.
DODIE   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOLLIE   f   English
Variant of DOLLY.
DOLLY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them... [more]
DOLORES   f   Spanish, English
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows"... [more]
DOMINICA   f   English (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of DOMINIC.
DONA   f   English
Variant of DONNA.
DONELLE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DON.
DONNA   f   English
From Italian donna meaning "lady". It is also used as a feminine form of DONALD.
DOREAN   f   English
Variant of DOREEN.
DOREEN   f   English
Combination of DORA and the name suffix een. The name was (first?) used by novelist Edna Lyall in her novel 'Doreen' (1894).
DORETTA   f   English
Diminutive of DORA.
DORIA   f   English (Rare)
Possibly a feminine form of DORIAN or an elaboration of DORA.
DORINDA   f   English
Combination of DORA and the name suffix inda. It was apparently coined by the English writers John Dryden and William D'Avenant for their play 'The Enchanted Island' (1667)... [more]
DORINE   f   English
Variant of DOREEN.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman"... [more]
DORITA   f   English (Rare), Spanish
Diminutive of DORA.
DOROTHEA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god"... [more]
DOROTHY   f   English
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz' (1900).
DORRIS   f   English
Variant of DORIS.
DORTHA   f   English
Variant of DOROTHY.
DORTHY   f   English
Variant of DOROTHY.
DORY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY or DORIS.
DOT   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOTTIE   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOTTY   f   English
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DOVE   f   English
From the English word for the variety of bird.
DREA   f   English
Short form of ANDREA (2).
DREDA   f   English (Archaic)
Short form of ETHELDREDA.
DRINA   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of ADRIANA.
DUANA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DUANE.
DULCIBELLA   f   English (Archaic)
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
DULCIE   f   English
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
DUSTY   m & f   English
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
DYAN   f   English
Variant of DIANE.
EARLEEN   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of EARL.
EARLENE   f   English
Feminine form of EARL.
EARLINE   f   English
Feminine form of EARL.
EARNESTINE   f   English
Variant of ERNESTINE.
EARTHA   f   English
Combination of the English word earth with the feminine name suffix a. It has been used in honour of African-American philanthropist Eartha M. M. White (1876-1974)... [more]
EASTER   f   English
From the English name of the Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus. It was ultimately named for the Germanic spring goddess Eostre... [more]
EBBA (2)   f   English
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of king Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland... [more]
EBONY   f   English
From the English word ebony for the black wood which comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDEN   f & m   Hebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden is the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, live before they are expelled.
EDIE   f   English
Diminutive of EDITH.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war"... [more]
EDNA (1)   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EDWEENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWINA   f   English
Feminine form of EDWIN.
EDWYNA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDYTHA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of EDYTHE.
EDYTHE   f   English
Variant of EDITH.
EFFIE (1)   f   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
EGLANTINE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.
EILEEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of EIBHLÍN. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of HELEN... [more]
EIREANN   f   English (Rare), Irish (Rare)
From Éireann, the genitive case of Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
ELAINA   f   English
Variant of ELAINE.
ELAINE   f   English, Arthurian Romance
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation 'Le Morte d'Arthur' Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad... [more]
ELEA   f   English
Short form of ELEANOR. This was also the name of an ancient Italian town (modern Velia) which is well known for being the home of the philosopher Parmenides and his student Zeno of Elea, who was famous for his paradoxes.
ELEANOR   f   English
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England... [more]
ELEANORA   f   English
Latinate form of ELEANOR.
ELEANORE   f   English
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELENORA   f   English
Form of ELEANOR.
ELFLEDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelflæd which means "noble beauty" from the elements æðel "noble" and flæd "beauty"... [more]
ELFREDA   f   English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryð "strength"... [more]
ELFRIDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDA   f   English
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELICIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ELINOR   f   English
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELISABETH   f   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELISSA (2)   f   English
Variant of ELISA.
ELIZA   f   English, Polish
Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).
ELIZABETH   f   English, Biblical
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance"... [more]
ELLA (1)   f   English
Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element alja meaning "other"... [more]
ELLA (2)   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El... [more]
ELLE   f   English (Modern)
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
ELLEN (1)   f   English
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.
ELLIE   f   English
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.
ELLY   f   English, Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH or an English variant of ELLIE.
ELNORA   f   English
Contracted form of ELEANORA.
ELOISE   f   English
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide"... [more]
ELOUISE   f   English
Variant of ELOISE.
ELSA   f   English, German, Swedish, Finnish, Italian
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSABETH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ELIZABETH.
ELSIE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
ELVINA   f   English
Variant of ALVINA.
ELYSE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. It was popularized in the early 1980s by a character from the television comedy 'Family Ties'.
EM   f   English
Short form of EMILY or EMMA.
EMALEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EMILY.
EMELIA   f   English
Variant of AMELIA.
EMELY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of EMILY.
EMERALD   f   English (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
EMERSON   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMERY   m & f   English
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages... [more]
EMILEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of EMILY.
EMILIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILY   f   English
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name... [more]
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute... [more]
EMMALINE   f   English
Variant of EMMELINE.
EMMALYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of EMMELINE, or else a combination of EMMA and the fashionable name suffix lyn.
EMMELINE   f   English (Archaic)
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work"... [more]
EMMIE   f   English
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
EMMY   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
ENOLA   f   English
Meaning unknown. This name first appeared in the late 19th century.
EPIPHANY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) which commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
EPPIE   f   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA or HEPHZIBAH.
ERICA   f   English, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERICKA   f   English
Variant of ERICA.
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERIN   f   English, Irish
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
ERMA   f   English
Variant of IRMA. It began to be used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century, along with Irma.
ERMINTRUDE   f   English (Archaic)
English form of ERMENDRUD. It was occasionally used until the 19th century.
ERNESTINE   f   French, German, English
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERYKAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERICA.
ERYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERIN.
ESME   m & f   English
Variant of ESMÉ.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
ESMÉE   f   English, Dutch
Feminine form of ESMÉ.
ESMERALDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo... [more]
ESSENCE   f   English (Modern)
From the English word essence which means either "odour, scent" or else "fundamental quality". Ultimately it derives from Latin esse "to be".
ESSIE   f   English
Diminutive of ESTELLE or ESTHER.
ESTA   f   English
Diminutive of ESTHER.
ESTELLA   f   English
Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTELLE   f   English, French
From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR... [more]
ETHEL   f   English
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived... [more]
ETHELINDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelind, derived from the elements æðel "noble" and lindi "snake"... [more]
ETHELYN   f   English
Diminutive of ETHEL.
ETTA   f   English
Short form of HENRIETTA and other names that end with etta. A famous bearer was the American singer Etta James (1938-), who took her stage name from her real given name Jamesetta.
ETTIE   f   English
Diminutive of HENRIETTA and other names ending with etta or ette.
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man... [more]
EULA   f   English
Short form of EULALIA.
EULALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk"... [more]
EUNICE   f   Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευνικη (Eunike) which meant "good victory" from ευ (eu) "good" and νικη (nike) "victory"... [more]
EUPHEMIA   f   Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare"... [more]
EUSTACIA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of EUSTACE.
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament... [more]
EVALINE   f   English
Variant of EVELYN.
EVALYN   f   English
Variant of EVELYN.
EVANGELINA   f   Spanish, English
Latinate form of EVANGELINE.
EVANGELINE   f   English
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message"... [more]
EVE   f   English, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live"... [more]
EVELEEN   f   English (Rare)
Either a diminutive of EVE or a variant of EVELYN.
EVELINA   f   English, Italian, Swedish
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel 'Evelina' (1778)... [more]
EVELINE   f   English, French, Dutch
Variant of EVELINA.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EVETTE   f   English
Variant of YVETTE.
EVIE   f   English
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
EVONNE   f   English
Variant of YVONNE.
EVVIE   f   English
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
FAE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FAITH   f   English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
FAITHE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of FAITH.
FALLON   f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.
FANCY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word fancy which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαινω (phaino) "to show, to appear".
FANNIE   f   English
Variant of FANNY.
FANNY   f   English, French, Spanish
Diminutive of FRANCES. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FAWN   f   English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FAY   f   English
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century... [more]
FAYE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FELICIA   f   English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of FELIX. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century... [more]
FEMIE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
FERN   f   English
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
FERNE   f   English
Variant of FERN.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FIONA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FLANNERY   f & m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour"... [more]
FLEUR   f   French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLICK   f   English
Diminutive of FELICITY.
FLO   f   English
Short form of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLOELLA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of FLO.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France... [more]
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages... [more]
FLORETTA   f   English, German (Rare)
Latinate diminutive of FLORA.
FLORRIE   f   English
Diminutive of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLOSSIE   f   English
Diminutive of FLORENCE.
FLOWER   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FORTUNE   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
FRAN   m & f   Spanish, English, Croatian, Slovene
Short form of FRANCIS, FRANCES or related names.
FRANCENE   f   English (Rare)
English variant of FRANCINE.
FRANCES   f   English
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century... [more]
FRANCINE   f   French, English
Feminine diminutive of FRANÇOIS.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used... [more]
FRANKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
FRANNIE   f   English
Diminutive of FRANCES.
FRANNY   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANCIS or FRANCES.
FREDA   f   English
Short form of names ending in freda or fred, such as WINIFRED or ALFREDA.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREDERICA   f   Portuguese, English
Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK.
FREIDA   f   English
Variant of FRIEDA.
FREYA   f   Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard... [more]
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRONA   f   English
Diminutive of SOPHRONIA.
GABBY   m & f   English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GAE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of GAY.
GAIL   f   English
Short form of ABIGAIL.
GAILA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of GAIL.
GALE (1)   f   English
Variant of GAIL.
GARDENIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GARNET (1)   f   English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname which referred either to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or who sold pomegranates (Old French pome grenate).
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GAY   f   English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
GAYE (1)   f   English
Variant of GAY.
GAYLA   f   English
Elaborated form of GAIL.
GAYLE   f & m   English
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GAYNOR   f   English (British)
Medieval form of GUINEVERE.
GEENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of GINA.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENA (1)   f   English
Variant of GINA.
GENESIS   f   English (Modern)
Means "birth" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
GENETTE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JEANETTE.
GENEVA   f   English
Possibly a shortened form of GENEVIEVE. It could also be inspired by the name of the city in Switzerland. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
GENEVIEVE   f   English
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GENIE   f   English
Diminutive of EUGENIA.
GEORGEANNA   f   English
Variant of GEORGIANA.
GEORGENE   f   English
Variant of GEORGINE.
GEORGIA   f   English, Greek
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II... [more]
GEORGIANA   f   English
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use since the 18th century.
GEORGIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of GEORGIA or GEORGE.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GERALDINE   f   English
Feminine form of GERALD.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERTIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDE   f   English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength"... [more]
GILL   f   English
Short form of GILLIAN.
GILLIAN   f   English
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
GINA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina... [more]
GINGER   f   English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GINNIE   f   English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GINNY   f   English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GISELLE   f   French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court... [more]
GISSELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of GISELLE.
GITHA   f   English (Archaic)
Variant of GYTHA.
GLADYS   f   Welsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA... [more]
GLENDA   f   Welsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GLENNA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of GLENN.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898)... [more]
GLORIANA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
GLORY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
GOLDIE (1)   f   English
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
GRACE   f   English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans... [more]
GRACELYN   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of GRACE using the popular name suffix lyn.
GRACIE   f   English
Diminutive of GRACE.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GRETA   f   Swedish, German, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHEN   f   German, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETTA   f   English
Variant of GRETA.
GREY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of GRAY.


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