Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is English.
There are 2,460 names matching your criteria. This is page 6.

LONDON   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LONDYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of LONDON.
LORA   f   English, Italian
Variant of LAURA. It is also used as an Italian diminutive of ELEONORA or LOREDANA.
LORAINE   f   English
Variant of LORRAINE.
LORAINNE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LORRAINE.
LORAYNE   f   English
Variant of LORRAINE.
LOREEN   f   English
Elaboration of LORA.
LORELLE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LAUREL.
LOREN   m & f   English
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LORENA (2)   f   English
Latinized form of LAUREN. This name was first brought to public attention in America by the song 'Lorena' (1856), written by Joseph Webster, who was said to have created the name as an anagram of LENORE (from the character in Poe's poem 'The Raven').
LORENE   f   English
Elaboration of LORA.
LORETTA   f   English, Italian
Either an elaboration of LORA or a variant of LAURETTA. It is also sometimes used as a variant of LORETO.
LORI   f   English
Diminutive of LAURA or LORRAINE.
LORIE   f   English
Variant of LORI.
LORINDA   f   English
Elaboration of LORA.
LORNA   f   English
Created by the author R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869), set in southern England, which describes the dangerous love between John Ridd and Lorna Doone... [more]
LORRAINE   f   English
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum)... [more]
LORRI   f   English
Variant of LORI.
LORRIE   f   English
Variant of LORI.
LOTTIE   f   English, Swedish
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE or LISELOTTE.
LOTUS   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτος (lotos)... [more]
LOU   f & m   English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
LOUELLA   f   English
Combination of LOU and the popular name suffix ella.
LOUISA   f   English, German, Dutch
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS.
LOUISE   f   French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVE (2)   f   English
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
LUANA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the movie 'Bird of Paradise' (1932), in which it was borne by the main character, a Polynesian girl. The movie was based on a 1912 play of the same name set in Hawaii.
LUANN   f   English
Either a combination of LOU and ANN or a variant of LUANA... [more]
LUANNA   f   English (Rare)
Either a combination of LOU and ANNA or a variant of LUANA.
LUANNE   f   English
Variant of LUANN.
LUCETTA   f   English
Diminutive of LUCIA. Shakespeare used this name for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind... [more]
LUCILE   f   French, English
Variant of LUCILLE.
LUCILLE   f   French, English
French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).
LUCINDA   f   English, Portuguese, Literature
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
LUCY   f   English
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LUELLA   f   English
Variant of LOUELLA.
LULA   f   English
Diminutive of LOUISE and names that begin with Lu.
LUVENIA   f   English
Possibly a form of LAVINIA. It has been used in America since the 19th century.
LUVINIA   f   English
Variant of LUVENIA.
LYDA   f   English (Rare)
Perhaps a variant of LYDIA.
LYDIA   f   English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul... [more]
LYLA   f   English
Variant of LEILA.
LYN   f   English
Variant of LYNN.
LYNDA   f   English
Variant of LINDA.
LYNDI   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LINDY.
LYNDSAY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYNDSEA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYNDSEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYNETTE   f   English
Form of LUNED first used by Alfred Lord Tennyson in his poem 'Gareth and Lynette' (1872). In modern times it is also regarded as a diminutive of LYNN.
LYNN   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Welsh llyn "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls... [more]
LYNNA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of LYNN.
LYNNE   f   English
Variant of LYNN.
LYNNETTE   f   English
Variant of LYNETTE.
LYNSAY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYNSEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYRIC   f   English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
LYSETTE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LISETTE.
LYSSA   f   English
Short form of ALYSSA.
MABEL   f   English
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century... [more]
MABELLA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of MABEL.
MABELLE   f   English
Variant of MABEL. It also coincides with the French phrase ma belle meaning "my beautiful".
MABLE   f   English
Variant of MABEL.
MACEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MACY.
MACI   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MACY.
MACIE   f   English
Variant of MACY.
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel... [more]
MACY   f   English
From an English surname which was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius... [more]
MADALYN   f   English
Variant of MADELINE.
MADDIE   f   English
Diminutive of MADELINE or MADISON.
MADDISON   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MADISON.
MADDY   f   English
Diminutive of MADELINE or MADISON.
MADELAINE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MADELINE.
MADELEINE   f   French, English, Swedish
French form of MAGDALENE.
MADELINA   f   English (Rare)
Latinate form of MADELINE.
MADELINE   f   English, French
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
MADELYN   f   English
Variant of MADELINE.
MADGE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MADILYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MADELINE.
MADISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City... [more]
MADISYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MADISON.
MADLYN   f   English
Variant of MADELINE.
MADOLINE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MADELINE.
MADONNA   f   English
From a title of the Virgin Mary meaning "my lady" in Italian. A famous bearer of the name is American singer Madonna Ciccone (1958-), known simply as Madonna.
MADYSON   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MADISON.
MAE   f   English
Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
MAEGAN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MEGAN.
MAEGHAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MEGAN.
MAGDALEN   f   English
Variant of MAGDALENE.
MAGDALENE   f   German, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From a title which meant "of Magdala". Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament, was named thus because she was from Magdala - a village on the Sea of Galilee whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew... [more]
MAGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAGNOLIA   f   English
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
MAHALA   f   English
Variant of MAHALAH or MAHALATH. It has occasionally been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.
MAHALIA   f   English
Variant of MAHALA.
MAKAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MAKENNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MCKENNA.
MALANDRA   f   English (Rare)
Invented name, a prefixed form of ANDRA.
MALEAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MALIA.
MALINDA   f   English
Variant of MELINDA.
MALLORY   f   English (Modern)
From an English surname which meant "unfortunate" in Norman French. It first became common in the 1980s due to the television comedy 'Family Ties', which featured a character by this name.
MALVINA   f   Scottish, English, Literature
Created by the poet James MacPherson in the 18th century for a character in his Ossian poems. He probably intended it to mean "smooth brow" in Gaelic.
MAMIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARY or MARGARET.
MANDI   f   English
Diminutive of AMANDA.
MANDY   f   English
Diminutive of AMANDA.
MARALYN   f   English
Variant of MARILYN.
MARCELYN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MARCELINE.
MARCI   f   English
Diminutive of MARCIA.
MARCIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCIUS. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
MARCIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARCIA.
MARCY   f   English
Diminutive of MARCIA.
MAREE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MARIE.
MARGARET   f   English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari)... [more]
MARGARETTA   f   English
Latinate form of MARGARET.
MARGE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGERY   f   English
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARGIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGO   f   English
Variant of MARGOT.
MARIABELLA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of MARIA and BELLA.
MARIAH   f   English
Variant of MARIA. It is usually pronounced in a way that reflects an older English pronunciation of Maria. The name was popularized in the early 1990s by the American singer Mariah Carey (1970-).
MARIAN (1)   f   English
Variant of MARION (1). This name was borne in English legend by Maid Marian, Robin Hood's love... [more]
MARIANNA   f   Italian, English, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Greek
Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms... [more]
MARIANNE   f   French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1)... [more]
MARIE   f   French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution... [more]
MARIEL   f   English
Diminutive of MARY influenced by MURIEL. In the case of actress Mariel Hemingway (1961-), the name is from the Cuban town of Mariel.
MARIGOLD   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MARILOU   f   French, English, Dutch
Combination of MARIA and LOUISE.
MARILYN   f   English
Combination of MARY and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MARILYNN   f   English
Variant of MARILYN.
MARINDA   f   English
Either a diminutive of MARY or a variant of MIRANDA.
MARION (1)   f   French, English
Medieval French diminutive of MARIE.
MARIS   f   English (Rare)
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
MARISA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARISSA   f   English
Variant of MARISA.
MARJE   f   English
Diminutive of MARJORIE.
MARJORIE   f   English
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MARJORY   f   English
Variant of MARJORIE.
MARLA   f   English
Shortened form of MARLENE.
MARLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MARLEY.
MARLEEN   f   Dutch, English
Dutch form and English variant of MARLENE.
MARLENA   f   English, Polish
Latinate form of MARLENE.
MARLENE   f   German, English
Blend of MARIA and MAGDALENE. It refers, therefore, to Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament... [more]
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARLY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MARLEY.
MARLYN   f   English
Variant of MARILYN.
MARNIE (1)   f   English
Variant of MARNA. This name was brought to public attention by Alfred Hitchcock's movie 'Marnie' (1964).
MARSHA   f   English
Variant of MARCIA.
MARTHA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) "master"... [more]
MARTIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of MARTIN, MARTINA or MARTHA.
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MARVA   f   English
Feminine form of MARVIN.
MARY   f   English, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament... [more]
MARYANN   f   English
Combination of MARY and ANN.
MARYANNE   f   English
Combination of MARY and ANNE (1).
MARYBETH   f   English
Combination of MARY and BETH.
MARYLOU   f   English
Combination of MARY and LOU.
MARYLU   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MARYLOU.
MARYLYN   f   English
Variant of MARILYN.
MATILDA   f   English, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle"... [more]
MATTIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of MATILDA or MATTHEW.
MAUD   f   English, Dutch
Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).
MAUDE   f   English
Variant of MAUD.
MAUDIE   f   English
Diminutive of MAUD.
MAURA (2)   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.
MAUREEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRÍN.
MAURENE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MAUREEN.
MAURINE   f   English, Irish
Variant of MAUREEN.
MAVIS   f   English
From the name of the type of bird, also called the song thrush, ultimately derived from Old French. It was first used as a given name by the British author Marie Corelli, who used it for a character in her novel 'The Sorrows of Satan' (1895).
MAXENE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MAXINE.
MAXINE   f   English
Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.
MAY   f   English
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MAYA (2)   f   English
Variant of MAIA (1). This name can also be given in reference to the Maya peoples, a Native American culture who built a great civilization in southern Mexico and Latin America.
MAYBELLE   f   English
Variant of MABEL.
MAYBELLINE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of MABEL.
MAYME   f   English
Possibly a variant of MAMIE.
MCKAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MCKENNA   f   English (Modern)
From the Gaelic surname Mac Cionaodha, which means "son of CIONAODH".
MEADE   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
MEADOW   f   English (Modern)
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MEAGAN   f   English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEAGHAN   f   English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEG   f   English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MEGAN   f   Welsh, English
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEGHAN   f   English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEL   m & f   English
Short form of MELVIN, MELANIE, MELISSA, and other names beginning with Mel.
MELANIE   f   English, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark"... [more]
MELANTHA   f   English (Rare)
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the suffix antha (from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower")... [more]
MELANY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MELANIE.
MELBA   f   English
From the surname of the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931). This was a stage name that she got from the name of the city Melbourne, where she was born.
MELESINA   f   English (Rare)
Perhaps a form of MILLICENT. It was borne by the Irish writer and socialite Melesina Trench (1768-1827).
MELICENT   f   English (Archaic)
Older form of MILLICENT.
MELINA   f   English, French, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey"... [more]
MELINDA   f   English
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda... [more]
MELISSA   f   English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516)... [more]
MELLONY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MELANIE.
MELODY   f   English
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".
MELVA   f   English
Perhaps a feminine form of MELVIN.
MELYSSA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MELISSA.
MERCIA   f   English (Rare)
Latinate form of MERCY. This was also the name of an old Anglo-Saxon kingdom, though it has a different origin.
MERCY   f   English
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
MEREDITH   m & f   Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales... [more]
MERIDETH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MEREDITH.
MERIDITH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MEREDITH.
MERIEL   f   English (Archaic)
Variant of MURIEL.
MERILYN   f   English
Variant of MARILYN.
MERLA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MERLE.
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERLETTA   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of MERLE.
MERLYN   m & f   English
Variant of MERLIN, sometimes used as a feminine form. It has perhaps been influenced by the Welsh word merlyn meaning "pony".
MERRILYN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MARILYN.
MERRY (1)   f   English
From the English word merry, ultimately from Old English myrge. This name appears in Charles Dickens' novel 'Martin Chuzzlewit' (1844), where it is a diminutive of MERCY.
MERYL   f   English
Variant of MURIEL, influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICHAELA   f   German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHAYLA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MICHELE (2)   f   English
Variant of MICHELLE.
MICHELLE   f   French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.
MICHELYNE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of MICHELLE.
MICKEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse... [more]
MIDGE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MADGE.
MIKAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MIKHAILA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MICHAELA, possibly influenced by the spelling of Mikhail.
MIKKI   f   English
Strictly feminine variant of MICKEY.
MILDRED   f   English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength"... [more]
MILEY   f   English (Modern)
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled... [more]
MILLICENT   f   English
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong"... [more]
MILLIE   f   English
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MIMI   f   English, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
MINA (1)   f   English, Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MINDY   f   English
Diminutive of MELINDA.
MINERVA   f   Roman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena... [more]
MINNIE   f   English
Diminutive of WILHELMINA.
MINTA   f   English (Rare)
Short form of ARAMINTA.
MINTY   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of ARAMINTA.
MIRABELLE   f   French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIRACLE   f   English (Modern)
From the English word miracle for an extraordinary event, ultimately deriving from Latin miraculum "wonder, marvel".
MIRANDA   f   English, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island... [more]
MIRIAM   f   Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron... [more]
MISSIE   f   English
Diminutive of MELISSA.
MISSY   f   English
Diminutive of MELISSA.
MISTI   f   English
Variant of MISTY.
MISTY   f   English
From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song 'Misty' (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.
MO   f & m   English
Short form of MAUREEN, MAURICE, MORRIS, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MODESTY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
MOIRA   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates... [more]
MOLLIE   f   English
Variant of MOLLY.
MOLLY   f   English
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MONA (1)   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MONDAY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This was formerly given to girls born on Monday.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity... [more]
MONIQUE   f   French, English, Dutch
French form of MONICA.
MONNA   f   English
Variant of MONA (1).
MONTANA   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".
MORA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MAURA (2).
MOREEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÓIRÍN. It is sometimes used as a variant of MAUREEN.
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORGANA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORIAH   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English (Modern)
Possibly means "seen by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple... [more]
MURIEL   f   English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany... [more]
MURPHY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MYA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MIA.
MYRA   f   English
Created by the 17th-century poet Fulke Greville. He possibly based it on Latin myrra meaning "myrrh" (a fragrant resin obtained from a tree). Otherwise, he may have simply rearranged the letters from the name MARY... [more]
MYRANDA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MIRANDA.
MYRTIE   f   English
Diminutive of MYRTLE.
MYRTLE   f   English
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μυρτος (myrtos)... [more]
NADIA (1)   f   French, English, Italian, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name... [more]
NADINE   f   French, German, English
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NAN   f   English
Originally a diminutive of ANN. It may have originated with the affectionate phrase mine Ann, which was later reinterpreted as my Nan... [more]
NANCY   f   English
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN... [more]
NANETTE   f   English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NANNIE   f   English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NANNY   f   English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NAOMI (1)   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness"... [more]
NARELLE   f   English (Australian)
Meaning unknown. It was borne by the wife of Umbarra, who was a 19th-century leader of the Yuin, an Aboriginal people.
NAT   m & f   English
Short form of NATHAN, NATHANIEL, NATALIE, or other names beginning with Nat.
NATALEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of NATALIE.
NATALIE   f   French, English, German
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia... [more]
NATASHA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NATILLE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of NATALIE.
NELDA   f   English
Possibly an elaboration of NELL using the popular name suffix da.
NELL   f   English
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN... [more]
NELLE   f   English
Variant of NELL.
NELLIE   f   English
Diminutive of NELL.
NELLY   f   English
Diminutive of NELL.
NENA   f   English
Variant of NINA (1).
NESS (2)   f   English
Short form of VANESSA.
NESSA (1)   f   English
Short form of VANESSA and other names ending in nessa.
NETTA (1)   f   English
Short form of names ending in netta.
NETTIE   f   English
Diminutive of names ending in nette, such as ANNETTE or JEANETTE.
NEVA   f   English
Short form of GENEVA.
NEVADA   f   English
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
NEVAEH   f   English (Modern)
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000.
NIA (3)   f   English
Short form of ANTONIA and other names ending in nia.
NICHOLA   f   English (British)
Feminine form of NICHOLAS.


   < Previous Page      Next Page >   


QUICK FILTER
  Gender: 
  Usage: